Is this a record ? - hillman

Last Monday, I was driving along an unlit country road and I was followed by a car with discharge type headlights, bright DRLs and foglights. Is this a record ?

I quickly adjusted the rear view mirror so that the glare was not so bad. If it was an oncoming car the glare could have given me a problem.

Perhaps the BRs could tell me whether some cars have separate switches for front and rear foglights ?

We don’t get fog nowadays as we used to. I remember riding my motorcycle combination slowly through the centre of Salford during a smog. I had a spotlight mounted on the chassis specially aimed at the nearside kerb about 10 feet ahead. I took off the windscreen so that I could see the kerb. I was accustomed to collecting a convoy of cars and buses.

Is this a record ? - corax

I think all the cars I've had have had separate switches for front and rear foglights.

The worst fog I experienced was on the North York Moors on holiday, driving back to the B&B at night. I literally couldn't see much more than a few feet. I only just avoided a couple of dead sheep in the road.

Foglights make some difference due to their angle but it's still difficult to drive. I've also had a couple of instances where a sea of stationary red lights have appeared through the gloom and brakes used sharpish, nervously looking in the rear mirror to check whether the cars approaching are actually going to stop in time.

It's been discussed before but some modern headlights are just too bright to be safe to oncoming drivers. It almost smacks of one upmanship amongst car manufacturers, the winner currently being Audi.

Is this a record ? - mss1tw

I always wonder what they think when an identical car comes towards them at night

Is this a record ? - Andrew-T

I think all the cars I've had have had separate switches for front and rear foglights.

The sportier versions of the Pug 205 came with twin driving lamps set low in the front valance and switched with the main beam. They were called 'driving lamps' but worked fairly well as foglamps.

Is this a record ? - Smileyman

is it normal for the DLR's to remain on if the healights are on?

As for front fog lights, I've noticed a problem with my new car, the warning light for front fog lights is next to the switch, not on the dashboard with other warning lights... so they can be on and as the switch is low down on the right I'd not have an easy to spot reminder that these lights are on ...

(I may not be popular with this comment!!) I find the best way to deal with lights in the rear view mirror is to drive faster .... with the expectation of a greater gap developing between the two vehicles, of course useless if the other party has high bean on ....

I do like my super bright LED headlings, like the Xenon headlights on previous car, proper and quality illumination of the road ahead (especially picking out the road signs and roadside reflectors) is a useful aid to safer driving

Edited by Smileyman on 07/11/2017 at 21:01

Is this a record ? - Andrew-T

I do like my super bright LED headlings, like the Xenon headlights on previous car, proper and quality illumination of the road ahead (especially picking out the road signs and roadside reflectors) is a useful aid to safer driving.

To you, yes. But to facing drivers, no - as has been suggested above. However cleverly the beam cutoff has been managed, uneven road surfaces and humps negate all the good work. There is little defence against overpowering headlamps except getting a car with stronger ones, so things just get steadily worse for everyone.

Is this a record ? - Manatee

The DRLs go off on the Outlander when the headlamps are on, and I can see no reason why they shouldn't on all cars.

I agree that HIDs are an arms race, if everybody had them we would be no better off. Jaguar Land Rover cars seem to be the worst for nodding, and for stupid DRLs on the Land Rovers that look like Christmas decorations.

Cars are almost too good now, unthinking drivers exist is a bubble in which they feel impregnable and driver aids such as autonomous emergency braking will only make that worse.

In monsoon-like rain recently with widespread standing water I was still being overtaken by traffic moving at 80+, the drivers presumably blissfully unaware of their tyres' tenuous grip levels and full confident of AEB, ABS, ASC etc to protect them.

Is this a record ? - hillman

"(I may not be popular with this comment!!) I find the best way to deal with lights in the rear view mirror is to drive faster .... with the expectation of a greater gap developing between the two vehicles, of course useless if the other party has high bean on ...."

Most cars now have rear view mirrors that have two positions, one for normal driving and one when a tailgating car following has headlights that are just too bright. Where there are no streetlights, and a car is tailgating as described, the two position mirror is a good safety feature. For those who do not know (not the BRs) just move the mirror handle until the mirror dips the light; some you move it forward and some you move move it back.

Is there anything we can do about headlights that are just too bright ? With the numerous regulations governing road use there must be something, possibly in the MOT, about headlights. There is a stretch of road that I travel on where there is a right turn on a slight hill, left turn for oncoming cars. Ordinary headlights are OK but I'm often dazzled by superbright headlights.

Is this a record ? - Andrew-T

Most cars now have rear view mirrors that have two positions, one for normal driving and one when a tailgating car following has headlights that are just too bright. Where there are no streetlights, and a car is tailgating as described, the two position mirror is a good safety feature.

'Most cars' have had dipping mirrors for 30 years at least. They are indeed useful, but headlights still get you via the outside mirrors. All you can do with those is to point them somewhere else, not really a safety feature.

Is this a record ? - hillman

"(I may not be popular with this comment!!) I find the best way to deal with lights in the rear view mirror is to drive faster .... with the expectation of a greater gap developing between the two vehicles, of course useless if the other party has high bean on ...."

Most cars now have rear view mirrors that have two positions, one for normal driving and one when a tailgating car following has headlights that are just too bright. Where there are no streetlights, and a car is tailgating as described, the two position mirror is a good safety feature. For those who do not know (not the BRs) just move the mirror handle until the mirror dips the light; some you move it forward and some you move move it back.

Is there anything we can do about headlights that are just too bright ? With the numerous regulations governing road use there must be something, possibly in the MOT, about headlights. There is a stretch of road that I travel on where there is a right turn on a slight hill, left turn for oncoming cars. Ordinary headlights are OK but I'm often dazzled by superbright headlights.

Is this a record ? - SkodaIan

DRLs either switch off or dim when the headlights are switched on. As far as I know the only way to get both fully on at once on a standard car is to hold the (main beam) headlights on with the flasher switch on the indicator stalk.

It's possible that the car behind you was doing exactly that, along with switching the front foglights on to "make a point" to tell you that you'd done something wrong (in their view), such as driving slower than they want to go, or not owning an Audi.

Is this a record ? - argybargy

You're right about there not being anywhere near as much fog nowadays.

I seem to recall that when I was a child in the 60s, winter mornings usually featured either fog or snow, sometimes even both. One of my favourite noises when I was young was the foghorn on the Mersey, a sinister noise which was like the desolate, despairing hooting of some great, trapped monster.

Lights on cars are definitely getting brighter. Just down the road from here is an unlit section of highway, overspread by trees, restricted to 50mph and about a mile and a half long. When I drive on that road at night I use full beam when there's nothing ahead of me, then dip when I meet traffic coming the other way. Usually the oncoming traffic dips too, but dipped lights nowadays seem to be so bright that it makes less difference than it used to.

I think someone needs to do a survey about this, and publish the results immediately.

Is this a record ? - Manatee

You're right about there not being anywhere near as much fog nowadays.

I remember one occasion as maybe a 12 year old (so in the mid 60s) coming over the moors near Haworth in fog so thick that I was hanging out of the passenger window telling my father how far we were from side of the road. Nothing at all to be made out in front of the car.

Is this a record ? - John F

It would have been smog, not fog, from the nearby industrial towns belching smoke from the mill chimneys and coal fires of row upon row of terraces and 'back-to-backs'. The moorland rocks are still black, as are many of the old buildings. I too remember driving in such scary peasoupers which youngsters have no experience of and thankfully never will.

For dazzle protection, in this age of in-car gadgetry I am surprised so few models are fitted with a rear window blind that rises at a touch of a button in my old Audi.

 

Ask Honest John

Value my car