Insurance Black Listed - macski

In 2014 I was away from home when the car insurance ran out, I cancelled my renewal and took out new insurance through Aviva using the web.

Three weeks later I got a letter from Swinton demanding proof of no claims discount, I was busy at the time and went into their office a week later with my renewal as I did not have anything else.

I was informed that Swinton had cancelled my insurance that day, they would not reinstate it and I would be on a blacklisting.

Since then I have had to pay substantially more for my insurance (17% up this year).

Swinton head office say they do not place anyone on a black list, Aviva say I have never been insured with them, this year I complained to the ombudsman they are taking a long time (guess it is my fault for not complaining earlier.

Just wondered if anyone knows a short cut of getting myself of this short list

What laws are there regarding sharing of info between insurares, I understand sharing data about fraud and claims, but contract arrangments?

PS I got two more letter from Swinton demanding the NCB proof, they were posted before they cancelled but arrived late, never a phone call or a recorded letter

Edited by macski on 06/10/2017 at 19:14

Insurance Black Listed - argybargy

Who was your insurer when your cover ran out in 2014? If, as you appear to be saying, it was Swinton, why would they be demanding NCB proof for an existing customer?

I've never heard of any kind of blacklist. Obviously insurance companies will hike the cost of risky punters or even refuse to insure them, but that's not a "list", its just industry practice.

Are you sure the increase in your insurance costs is down to blacklisting? Have you had any accidents, claims or convictions in recent years? Are you driving a car which is in a higher insurance bracket than in previous years?

Insurance Black Listed - argybargy

Duplicate post.

Edited by argybargy on 06/10/2017 at 20:22

Insurance Black Listed - oldroverboy.

I assume that if you have proof for payment it would show that you had paid, therefore proving a policy was in place. You would have received an email, possibly with an attachment showing your insurance certificate. If your NCD showing on your renewal was less than 2 years old, then it would have been accepted.

17% as a raise in premiums could be normal depending on age/car/location.

Is there more to this, why the 3 year wait? what is the duration of the in between insurance times???

Insurance Black Listed - macski

I paid Swinton the full 12 month premium and did receive an electronic policy via a web login.

More Then did not cancel my policy as requested (did not find this out until Swinton Cancelled) so for year 14/15 continued with More Then although it was more expensive.

The following year I was rejected by a number of insurers. I wrote to both Aviva and Swinton several times over that year trying to resolve the issue. Over the last year various events came up including family not being well, work pressures and I neglected the situation,

I will get quotes via online companies like Go Compare but get rejected when I try to insure, this has never happened before

Insurance Black Listed - argybargy

If you've already involved the Financial Ombudsman then I reckon you'll have to leave it with them to look at the situation and make a decision, frustrating and expensive though that is.

Judging from what you say, it seems unlikely that the insurers concerned are going to help you sort out the situation without intervention from the regulator.

Insurance Black Listed - macski

Thanks, was hoping someone might have an solution, worth a try

Insurance Black Listed - bolt

I had problems with them years ago and will never use them again, imo they are incompetent

Im with Tesco now and never had a problem:)

Insurance Black Listed - Engineer Andy

I had problems with them years ago and will never use them again, imo they are incompetent

Im with Tesco now and never had a problem:)

The problem with insurance, as my Dad (who worked in general insurance for 35+ years and knows his stuff) said, you only really know how good an insurer is when you make a claim. Most people who say the like such-and-such insurer are likely to say so either becuase they are the cheapest or have had a better customer service at renewal time than their previous one.

I've never had a bad experience with my insurer, Esure (been with them for nigh on 15 years now), but again, that's because I've never had a significant claim in that time, only a windscreen replacement. I was with RAC (before they were taken over by that equity firm) beforehand, and had an excellent experience with them, including with one fault claim where everything went smoothly.

I only changed because they were significantly more expensive than most competitors, even after four subsequent years of no claims. General use of customer services at renewal time (especially if they get the quote or payment details wrong) is a reasonable guide to what may happen if you claim with them, but no guarantee.

Insurance Black Listed - argybargy

I'm back with Churchill after a few years with Saga, purely because of price.

I won't say that I haven't had a claim for a few years coz that's tempting the laws of Sod, but I've got good NCB and was very disappointed that Saga couldn't come up with a more competitive price this time round.

I always look at the Defaqto ratings, though I don't really know just how accurate they are in terms of the claims experience, which as you say, Andy, is the crucial bit and often missing when it comes to reviews.

Other than on price, making insurance comparisons without reviews of that claims experience is a bit like buying a car, leaving it in your garage and telling everyone how well it drives.

Insurance Black Listed - Engineer Andy

I'm back with Churchill after a few years with Saga, purely because of price.

I won't say that I haven't had a claim for a few years coz that's tempting the laws of Sod, but I've got good NCB and was very disappointed that Saga couldn't come up with a more competitive price this time round.

I always look at the Defaqto ratings, though I don't really know just how accurate they are in terms of the claims experience, which as you say, Andy, is the crucial bit and often missing when it comes to reviews.

Other than on price, making insurance comparisons without reviews of that claims experience is a bit like buying a car, leaving it in your garage and telling everyone how well it drives.

Exactly. I mean, how often do you see reviews of anything, whether it be cars, TVs, clothing or suchlike after a decent amount of time, so its long-term use can be evaluated? In my experience, 99% of reviews, especially by us consumers are doing so within a month or two of buying said product, especially if something's gone wrong. This patently skews the results.

A good example of this (a bit off topic but worth it, given it sort of applies to the insurance market, so bear with me) was that I bought, after a good deal of research, a Bosch bagless vacuum cleaner a couple of years or so ago. It got very good reviews from the 'professional' reviewers (e.g. Which? magazine & Co) and was very reasonably priced when compared to the expensive Sebos & Mieles and (seemingly) less reliable Dysons at the time.

Since I bought it, I had experience no end of problems - no actual breakdowns, but the large number of filters, possibly an inherrant design flaw or two (in my view) and IMO over-sensitive motor protection sensors mean that the unit is often going into the equivalent of a car's 'limp home mode' when the filters (easily) get clogged up with dust. You have to either spend a fortune of replacing the filters (or at least buy one complete set of spares when the others are cleaned, still not cheap) or clean/wash them and wait a day or two for them to dry out enough to use again. This needs to be done probably once every couple of months.

I re-read the reviews of this unit to see if anyone else had this issue, and lo and behold many people have, but most actual descriptive reviews have stayed the same (no edit function, except on Amazon and one or two other sites [including HJ]) even if the star rating has dropped from 4.5 / 5 to 2 / 5 tops. This is what I mean about reviews of cars and especially difficult to quantify products (if you don't use the full range of its services) like insurance. The star ratings are also an 'across the board' figure, when they should be broken down into sub-groups, such as:

  1. The original purchase experience (over the phone/website, stock and delivery, condition of the product when it arrives, etc);
  2. Product usage, both in the short and longer term (you should be able to edit this at any time). Obviously for certain products, like cars, this could be broken down further;
  3. Customer service experience if and when things go wrong or you need help. Again, this should be subject to editing over the longer term by customers.

I find it amazing that word of mouth review in many areas of life still dominates, despite the ease at which online reviews can be made and updated, if people set it up correctly. To me, some, perhaps including insurance and financial firms, want to set up unrepresentative reviews so that people are confused and just go by price - either cheapest, or, ironically, you get what you pay for and go expensive. To me, neither is entirely the truth in getting a good experience (that's not to say a middle ranking price is best as a 'compromise'!).

As HJ has said many times (and in my opinion too), the insurance industry is broken and needs a serious overhaul. To me, its set up for the benefit of the companies and not its customers as well. Very little transparency and a toothless ombudsman IMO (the same with utilities and other industies).

Insurance Black Listed - bolt

I had problems with them years ago and will never use them again, imo they are incompetent

Im with Tesco now and never had a problem:)

The problem with insurance, as my Dad (who worked in general insurance for 35+ years and knows his stuff) said, you only really know how good an insurer is when you make a claim. Most people who say the like such-and-such insurer are likely to say so either becuase they are the cheapest or have had a better customer service at renewal time than their previous one.

I've never had a bad experience with my insurer, Esure (been with them for nigh on 15 years now), but again, that's because I've never had a significant claim in that time, only a windscreen replacement. I was with RAC (before they were taken over by that equity firm) beforehand, and had an excellent experience with them, including with one fault claim where everything went smoothly.

I only changed because they were significantly more expensive than most competitors, even after four subsequent years of no claims. General use of customer services at renewal time (especially if they get the quote or payment details wrong) is a reasonable guide to what may happen if you claim with them, but no guarantee.

Several months after getting insurance through Swinton they sent letters and phoned to ask for NCD proof, which I gave them when I took out the insurance, ie, I dropped the info they asked for into a local office I have, or had used for years,

I did as they asked which they again took photocopies of.

a couple of months later they asked for it again and said they had not recieved payment for the insurance which was paid by debit card and I had proof...

they did not believe me and several weeks later was threatened with court action to recover the outstanding balance which was zero, I then had a court summons for the outstanding balance of cost of insurance plus costs, of which I sent the proof of payment and all paperwork from Swinton

I didnt hear anymore and cancelled my insurance with them and used Tesco instead

this was several years ago and as far as I know from relations they still cause problems for customers

Insurance Black Listed - argybargy

I used brokers, and specifically Swinton for the first couple of years after passing my test, purely and simply because I wanted to deal with a person.

Around 1991 we bought a Mini, the condition of which was entirely consistent with the cars we'd had before. Bought one evening, in the rain, no chance of seeing it properly till the next day, when it turned out to be a rustbucket.

Anyhow, I rang Swinton, got a quote and went into the local branch next day to insure the car (before we picked it up). The price quoted in the office was higher than the one I'd been given the day before, due to a couple of very minor changes to the info I'd given them first time round; can't remember exactly what they were. Not significant matters of disclosure, just "month when I passed my test", "time at current address", something like that.

I'm not generally a forceful or robust fighter of my corner when it comes to dealing with injustices inflicted upon me by officialdom, but on this occasion I had a stand up row with the office manager and eventually walked away and got my insurance somewhere else.

If they'd wanted the business they could have had it, but he insisted, seemingly as a matter of principle, that a pathetic amount of extra money was more important than having me as a customer.

 

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