Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - oldroverboy.

After getting my white lines repainted earlier in the year and that having stopped 99% of the inconsiderate parking in our little street, one particular offender has started again, the other day, double parking his lwb mercedes van next to his car, which is in front of his house, but then obstructs me from getting in and out of my drive.

I saw a "Parking Warden" the other day on the main road nearby, who, after explaining, told me he would drive past in his camera car, no need to stop, and it would be monitored /uploaded and a ticket issued by post.

I have no wish to confront the said person as he gets very verbally aggresssive quickly.

We'll see..

Edited by oldroverboy. on 08/09/2017 at 09:01

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - SLO76
Correct way of dealing with it. Life is way too short for getting into a verbal spat with a selfish idiot of a neighbour. Sit back and let the system dent his wallet.

Edited by SLO76 on 08/09/2017 at 09:14

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - Andrew-T

It's a shame when these situations can't be resolved face to face, so that everything has to be done impersonally. Buck passing of a sort, but sometimes the only way that may work, at least for a while. I hope you don't get a brick through your window, ORB.

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - Wackyracer

I wonder what the mentality of these people is at times. I've had similar situations with a neighbour who parks across my drive when he could park just 10 feet further back (still outside my house) but, it would allow me to leave when I wanted without having to ask for his permission.

I think it's the 'me me' attitude everyone seems to have thesedays. What ever happened to consideration for others?

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - argybargy

I don't have a driveway at present but the Close is so quiet that parking on the road is rarely an issue.

However, in our last house we lived in a short cul de sac and we had the only driveway in the street, all the others being obliged to park on the road. Because of the position of our house at the head of the cul de sac, and because we had no frontage onto the road itself, we had to rely on our next door neighbour to leave enough space for us to get in, which she invariably did, bless her.

However, several other neighbours were less considerate, and I spent a good amount of time knocking on doors, politely asking folks to move their cars for the umpteenth time so I could get in, and because I am pretty good at asking nicely nobody ever refused.

However, there were occasions when the offender had themselves been having trouble getting into the street to park, and clearly felt like asking me why I considered myself to be a special case just because we had a driveway. Fortunately they never did ask, and eventually we left all that behind.

However, in the house before that we had Hell because of lorries delivering to a local shop and parking outside our house. Another story.

Good luck with your particular problem, ORB. It baffles me why some people seem to take the route of being stupidly ignorant when being considerate makes life so much easier for all concerned.

Edited by argybargy on 08/09/2017 at 10:51

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - RichT54

I live in a Close and have a small front lawn with a row of small paving slabs at the edge next to the curb. Visitors to my next door neighbour frequently park with a couple of wheels on the paving slabs (one of which is now cracked) or even on the lawn. One woman even parked her Juke so that it was almost all on my lawn. When I asked her why, she said she didn't know where else she was supposed to park!

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - oldroverboy.

I hope you don't get a brick through your window, ORB.

Sadly, like many have gone down the road of cctv with live uploading, fence on the front to keep footballs out of swmbo's treasured flower garden, (it was "open plan") 6' gate at side of house, bolted to stop said footballs being recovered when booted over between back gardens. ( I always give them back when they ask) now ordered gates to fit at front of driveway to stop ball booted into car.. they are not neighbours from hell, the mother of the boys keeps them well in hand most of the time.

One side of the T of the close is dropped kerbs to allow access to the 3 garages and the electricity substation on that side and it is always used by people to leave their cars.

I really can't wait for parking to be banned on any pavement.

Sorry for my victor meldrew moment.

Part of the frustration is them knowing that when swmbo is on call she has 30 minutes to get in to the hospital, and we really don't want to go round knocking on doors at 3.ooam.

Edited by oldroverboy. on 08/09/2017 at 11:42

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - RT

The draconian method is to ban all on-road (and on-pavement!) parking - if you haven't got a space on your own property or an allocated space in communal parking then you can't have a vehicle - not going to get many politicians backing that though!

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - oldroverboy.

The draconian method is to ban all on-road (and on-pavement!) parking - if you haven't got a space on your own property or an allocated space in communal parking then you can't have a vehicle - not going to get many politicians backing that though!

Just banning parking on pavements would do, Oh and enforcing it.....

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - RT

The draconian method is to ban all on-road (and on-pavement!) parking - if you haven't got a space on your own property or an allocated space in communal parking then you can't have a vehicle - not going to get many politicians backing that though!

Just banning parking on pavements would do, Oh and enforcing it.....

That won't stop the drop-kerb parkers though.

Some towns do have roads with official signage requiring cars to park half on, half off the pavement.

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - oldroverboy.

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That won't stop the drop-kerb parkers though.

Just up here, about a mile or so is the new "development" of houses on the old severalls Hospital site and opposite on the site of Cants the rose growers, where they will be building many 1000's of houses with purpose built narrow streets so that in theory there will be no on road parking, and I am sure multiple cars in many of the houses, and those with garages will have the garages filled up with the "junk" that can no longer go in a modern house, as the house itself is built down to a size and price.

On some of the streets off the Northern relief road, the bin lorries cannot get through, or if they do, damage cars.

It's gonna be fun..

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - RT

There was a time when every new-build domestic residence was required under planning regulations to have an off-road parking space, if it had 4 or more bedrooms then 2 spaces were required - a garage counting as a space.

Over time, that regulation became inadequate as the number of cars per household rose but instead of increasing it, it was reduced to increase the number of homes per hectare - damn those politicians!

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - Andrew-T

<< Just banning parking on pavements would do, Oh and enforcing it..... >>

I think in theory the 'ban' already exists. The fundamental problem is that our established road system was never designed to have any vehicles left on it for any length of time - and of course there used to be many more pedestrians - and planners haven't tried much to allow for changed conditions. These days, when almost every person old enough to hold a driving licence 'needs' a car (hence making public road transport less viable) and assumes that wherever they take their 10 cubic metres of metal box, they may just dump it as close as possible to their destination. Anyone nearby wishing to enter or leave their property is just unlucky and will have to grovel to have the obstacle removed.

The impression I got since moving here 11 years ago (just off the A56) is that the problem developed when new housing was built opposite, and the builders had little choice but to use the pavement, which is 6 to 8 feet wide. The job took several months to finish, and after that it seemed that others thought it was open house. The parking itself does not cause serious congestion, but it certainly makes joining traffic more hazardous - just can't see down the busy road.

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - Doc

The draconian method is to ban all on-road (and on-pavement!) parking - if you haven't got a space on your own property or an allocated space in communal parking then you can't have a vehicle ............

An excellent idea and one that is in force in Japan, I believe.

It is amazing that people think there is unlimited space and that expect to be able to leave their property on the public road. If I bought a horse, I would make sure I had somewhere to keep it!

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - Dogfuzz

As late as the 1980's--this sort of behaviour was regularly seen in the centre of London and other high urban locations where selfishness ruled.

SO-Since traffic volumes show no sign of declining, it shouldn't be too long before every residential street has double yellow lines or parking machines.

Twenty years?

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - focussed

France has recently increased the fines for parking cars on pavements from €35 to €135.

Prior to increasing the fine, the offence was widely ignored by the police and flics.

Now it's a bigger earner, they are starting to enforce it. - Quelle surprise!

I'm happy to report though that the offence of parking on pavements does not apply to mopeds, scooters, motorcycles etc, as long as it does not block the pavement for pedestrians.

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - argybargy

The most obvious reason for not banning parking on pavements has already been mentioned above: the fact that, particularly in older towns which were built up before motorised vehicles were common, bin lorries, fire engines and delivery wagons would be unable to do their stuff if everyone kept their cars off the pavement, and we'd all be either buried under rubbish, burned to a crisp or worst of all, deprived of those smart new worktops.

In my home town, most of which was built on the late 1800s, early 1900s, the streets are simply not wide enough for cars to park on both sides of the roadway and still allow large vehicles through, so the council couldn't respond positively to any request to ban pavement parking even if they wanted to. In Warrington, where my brother in law used to live, there are areas of early 20th century terraced property with wide pavements and narrow roads, and virtually everyone parks entirely on the pavement.

The populace of the town continue to lodge bitter complaints on social media over having to steer their prams, wheelchairs and other pedestrian-operated vehicles around cars which are parked on pavements, but they're wasting their time until common sense eventually prevails and flying cars which can park on roofs become the norm.

Edited by argybargy on 08/09/2017 at 22:08

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - Energyman
If memory serves me right it was a minister who had a reputation of having '2 jags' who changed the parking space requirements for house planning.
Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - Andrew-T

The populace of the town continue to lodge bitter complaints on social media over having to steer their prams, wheelchairs and other pedestrian-operated vehicles around cars which are parked on pavements, but they're wasting their time until common sense eventually prevails and flying cars which can park on roofs become the norm.

Well they shouldn't be. Car owners have no right to obstruct pavements to the point where disabled people have to use the road to get past, for obvious safety reasons.

If we think back far enough, the ancient reason for a 'pavement' was that the 'road' (the part for wheeled traffic) was not paved, and often a mess. Foot passengers could then keep their delicate shoes clean and tidy.

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - SteveLee

I could boast my (recently ex) local council will turn up and tow a car an inch over your drive within 30 minutes - but what led to that is the desperation for the (fine) revenue as they're bankrupt; we enjoyed amongst the lowest rates/poll tax/council tax for decades and the council had healthy reserves while we were a working class/blue collar area - then in the late 90s Labour forced the council to house half the third world. Now every house and flat is brim full of taxpayer-dependant, non-productive but reproductive people and the actual taxpayers have fled to somewhere recognisably British. I'd rather have occassional parking issues than a destroyed social/economic fabric - be careful what you wish for.

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - csgmart

I could boast my (recently ex) local council will turn up and tow a car an inch over your drive within 30 minutes - but what led to that is the desperation for the (fine) revenue as they're bankrupt; we enjoyed amongst the lowest rates/poll tax/council tax for decades and the council had healthy reserves while we were a working class/blue collar area - then in the late 90s Labour forced the council to house half the third world. Now every house and flat is brim full of taxpayer-dependant, non-productive but reproductive people and the actual taxpayers have fled to somewhere recognisably British. I'd rather have occassional parking issues than a destroyed social/economic fabric - be careful what you wish for.

Well said.

Oh No... - More inconsiderate Parking - oldroverboy.

I'd rather have occassional parking issues than a destroyed social/economic fabric - be careful what you wish for.

Well said.

What i wish for is not printable here as the thought police would be after me.. on the subject of housing, I rent my little buy to let flat to a nice young lady who pays on time and is not a burden, despite being "begged" by the local council to accept a 1 child family last time i advertised. I said I would accept if I had written guarantee that they would be liable for all rent payments and all damage and any costs of eviction. i'll leave you to guess the reply. "The tenant receives the housing benefit and can assign it direct to the landlord but can cancel this arrangement at any time."

 

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