All makes - The future of Company Cars - Steveieb
with all the major manufacturers including Toyota, Lexus, BMW etc leading the way with petrol hybrid models it's interesting to learn that the company car users are reluctant to have their diesels taken off them.
Unless you are a city trader living in Maidenhead and travelling to the city wher a hybrid is ideal, the average rep may prefer the certainty of a diesel starting without charging , having a great range and only needs filling up once or twice a week , instead of three times with a large petrol.
Clarkson travelled to Edinburgh return on one tankful of diesel in an Audi A6
So economically the diesel is the only option and car fit for purpose for company car use IMHO.

Refill time 5 minutes , all electric up to two hours depending on power source.
All makes - The future of Company Cars - RT

Company fleet managers will buy cars based on total running costs over 3 years - company "user chosers" will select cars based on low BIK tax.

Hybrids are the future - here now.

Battery electrics still have range issues - they suit commuters but what do they thenb do for the occasional long journey.

All makes - The future of Company Cars - Terry W

I am somewhat surprised that the major car manufacturers do not provide a fuel capacity upgrade option - particularly as many have dispensed with a full size spare in favour of a can of goo.

The space taken by a typical 17" wheel is around 70 L which would comfortably double the range of the typical repmobile.

Therefore I don't think range anxiety is the reason for diesel preference - probably more to do with habit, flexible driving experience, lower car tax, etc.

All makes - The future of Company Cars - RT

I am somewhat surprised that the major car manufacturers do not provide a fuel capacity upgrade option - particularly as many have dispensed with a full size spare in favour of a can of goo.

The space taken by a typical 17" wheel is around 70 L which would comfortably double the range of the typical repmobile.

Therefore I don't think range anxiety is the reason for diesel preference - probably more to do with habit, flexible driving experience, lower car tax, etc.

Some makers do - Mercedes-Benz and Volkswagen to my knowledge.

I have a 100 litre tank in my VW Touareg, gives me a practical range of 750 miles on long hauls, less if it's urban use.

It's only battery electrics that have range anxiety - diesels, petrols, hybrids and plug-in hybrids can be readily refueled in a few minutes.

All makes - The future of Company Cars - Big John

I am somewhat surprised that the major car manufacturers do not provide a fuel capacity upgrade option -

On the latest Audi A4 a larger tank is an upgrade option

All makes - The future of Company Cars - Smileyman

Very much agree with this ... so many manufacturers put puny small fuel tanks on their cars, 40 - 45 litres, for the longer distance driver (or commuter) the range is very poor indeed.

Edited by Smileyman on 15/06/2017 at 00:27

All makes - The future of Company Cars - RobJP

Clarkson actually did his trip in an Audi A8, which had a 4.0 V8 diesel.

My 325d has a 57 litre tank, like all cars ifn the F3x range - whether 318d or 340i

All makes - The future of Company Cars - craig-pd130

Personally, I will miss my current Volvo V60 D4 when it goes back to the lease firm next month. But I'm excited to get its replacement, a 225xe plug-in hybrid.

I had one for a weekend evluation and it was a smashing drive: quicker than the Volvo in every respect up to 80mph, thanks to the electric assistance. Above 80mph it's not as brisk as the Volvo (electric assist cuts out at 79mph), but on today's roads, that's hardly an issue.

It only has an 8.5 gallon tank which will mean more frequent filling on longer journeys, but it will also save me £100 per month in BIK tax, so the occasional extra visit to a forecourt is a price worth paying.

All makes - The future of Company Cars - Ryanfuego

Hybrid cars the most effective and cost reducing nodawadays and the fact that future o the cars is seen as manufacturers are going to use more solar energy than the fuel, which may not exist in 30 years.

All makes - The future of Company Cars - Terry W

Not really sure range anxiety makes sense even for long distance trips. 400 miles is well within the range of most normally fuelled cars and will probably take between 6 - 8 hours driving depending on limits, conditions etc.

There may be a few of us with iron clad bladders happy to subsist on chocolate bars and crisps. But on long drives - eg: south of France to UK - I find a routine develops : 200m/3hrs coffee, facilities, 400m/6hrs coffee, facilities, petrol. Adds about 5 minutes to the stopped time.

Incidentally hybrids may not be the future. The only benefits could be in town where electric only below 30mph would displace city pollution to the suburbs, and fitting a smaller lighter ICE supplemented by a small battery for acceleration..

Fundamentally the energy required to make a car go is related to weight, size and aerodynamic efficiency. Hybrids typically add complexity, weight and cost. A Prius driven (say) 1000miles over assorted roads will use just as much fuel as its petrol only equivalent, and more than a diesel.

All makes - The future of Company Cars - RT

Not really sure range anxiety makes sense even for long distance trips. 400 miles is well within the range of most normally fuelled cars and will probably take between 6 - 8 hours driving depending on limits, conditions etc.

There may be a few of us with iron clad bladders happy to subsist on chocolate bars and crisps. But on long drives - eg: south of France to UK - I find a routine develops : 200m/3hrs coffee, facilities, 400m/6hrs coffee, facilities, petrol. Adds about 5 minutes to the stopped time.

Incidentally hybrids may not be the future. The only benefits could be in town where electric only below 30mph would displace city pollution to the suburbs, and fitting a smaller lighter ICE supplemented by a small battery for acceleration..

Fundamentally the energy required to make a car go is related to weight, size and aerodynamic efficiency. Hybrids typically add complexity, weight and cost. A Prius driven (say) 1000miles over assorted roads will use just as much fuel as its petrol only equivalent, and more than a diesel.

I have a 560 mile trip to Scotland in a few days - three "comfort" breaks plus a lunch stop - about 12 hours overall.

If I had £130,000 I could buy a Tesla S with the big battery but even that only has a range of 270 miles at motorway speeds - the location of the last Supercharger point on my route is in the Borders and would mean running out of juice around Aviemore and needing an overnight stay to do a 13A recharge.

So two days to do a one day journey - and at "only" 560 miles, no refueling necessary with my present diesel and I'd still have a third of a tank left for exploring the North Coast.

Last Sunday we had a day out with bird-watching friends - 380 miles but stopping in places with no electricity let alone charging points.

Battery electric has a long way to go before they make my long list, let alone the short list.

Edited by RT on 15/06/2017 at 13:09

All makes - The future of Company Cars - craig-pd130

If I had £130,000 I could buy a Tesla S with the big battery but even that only has a range of 270 miles at motorway speeds - the location of the last Supercharger point on my route is in the Borders and would mean running out of juice around Aviemore and needing an overnight stay to do a 13A recharge.

That's assuming you don't have to queue up at the charging point, too .... the last couple of times I've stopped at Warwick services on the M40, there's been a Tesla queueing for one of the three charging bays (which are often occupied by non-electric / non-hybrid cars!).

All makes - The future of Company Cars - galileo

That's assuming you don't have to queue up at the charging point, too .... the last couple of times I've stopped at Warwick services on the M40, there's been a Tesla queueing for one of the three charging bays (which are often occupied by non-electric / non-hybrid cars!).

Talking to a friend this week who had had a ride in a Tesla. According to him if you program a journey into the built in SatNav it pre-books charging points for you.

All makes - The future of Company Cars - RT

If I had £130,000 I could buy a Tesla S with the big battery but even that only has a range of 270 miles at motorway speeds - the location of the last Supercharger point on my route is in the Borders and would mean running out of juice around Aviemore and needing an overnight stay to do a 13A recharge.

That's assuming you don't have to queue up at the charging point, too .... the last couple of times I've stopped at Warwick services on the M40, there's been a Tesla queueing for one of the three charging bays (which are often occupied by non-electric / non-hybrid cars!).

That surprises me - whenever I've used motorway services I don't recall EVER seeing any cars in the recharging bays, EV or not.

All makes - The future of Company Cars - craig-pd130

That surprises me - whenever I've used motorway services I don't recall EVER seeing any cars in the recharging bays, EV or not.

Last time I was at Warwick, one of the bays was taken by a non plug-in Prius, which made me chuckle. Well, it's a sort of electric car :)

On the EV forums there's a long-running and heated argument about whether plug-in hybrid owners should give way to owners full electric vehicles at public charging points, as the former can always fill at the pump, they don't actually need to use the charge-points ....

All makes - The future of Company Cars - RT

That surprises me - whenever I've used motorway services I don't recall EVER seeing any cars in the recharging bays, EV or not.

Last time I was at Warwick, one of the bays was taken by a non plug-in Prius, which made me chuckle. Well, it's a sort of electric car :)

On the EV forums there's a long-running and heated argument about whether plug-in hybrid owners should give way to owners full electric vehicles at public charging points, as the former can always fill at the pump, they don't actually need to use the charge-points ....

First come, first served - or should PHEV owners also give way at petrol/diesel pumps because they "can always use electric" !!!

It annoys me, as a Blue Badge holder, that BB spaces have been converted to EV charging spaces and making some disabled people walk from the back of the parking area when it's busy.

It should have been spaces in av remote corner converted, not those near the facilities.

All makes - The future of Company Cars - craig-pd130

First come, first served - or should PHEV owners also give way at petrol/diesel pumps because they "can always use electric" !!!

It annoys me, as a Blue Badge holder, that BB spaces have been converted to EV charging spaces and making some disabled people walk from the back of the parking area when it's busy.

It should have been spaces in av remote corner converted, not those near the facilities.

Heh, that was PRECISELY one of the arguments used in the long-running argument :)

You are right about the displacement of BB spaces for EV charging, that should not be happening. I'm guessing it's cheaper and convenient to install the charging points close to the service buildings, which will be well-served with power lines.

All makes - The future of Company Cars - SkodaIan

It's not so much about being able to do a long journey in one go, more that the typical 200mile per day sales rep doesn't want to have to fill up every day.

Most petrol cars have a range of around 350 to 400 miles, which isn't quite enough for 2 days use.

Some of the standard hybrids do have a decent range. The IS300h has a 66 litre tank, which would give it a 500 mile plus range.

All makes - The future of Company Cars - Cluedo
My personal view, and I don't like it, is that the people still buying or choosing company cars as diesels will regret it very shortly. Phillip Hammond has already stated that anybody buying a diesel car should think twice about it which to me says he has given everyone fair warning and when he stings diesel drivers in the next budget he will get away with it on the grounds of protecting the environment. One sure way to raise extra money without too much trouble. He does not have that many opportunities to raise much more without bother with his current majority.
Plus the fact the so called motoring journalists keep recommending them.

Edited by Cluedo on 15/06/2017 at 20:36

All makes - The future of Company Cars - RT
My personal view, and I don't like it, is that the people still buying or choosing company cars as diesels will regret it very shortly. Phillip Hammond has already stated that anybody buying a diesel car should think twice about it which to me says he has given everyone fair warning and when he stings diesel drivers in the next budget he will get away with it on the grounds of protecting the environment. One sure way to raise extra money without too much trouble. He does not have that many opportunities to raise much more without bother with his current majority. Plus the fact the so called motoring journalists keep recommending them.

Politicians hints are as worthless as their promises - and sometimes even their legislation gets amended or repealed very quickly.

Without getting too political, this government is clinging on by the skin on their teeth - alienating half the electorate currently running diesels would be the last straw.

All makes - The future of Company Cars - wrangler_rover
My company car was renewed recently.
I had a choice of 6 x 2 litre diesel cars plus the Mitsubishi Outlander plug in hybrid.
I chose the Outlander because of the low benefits in kind, it saves me £100 per month in income tax.
The claimed 150 miles per gallon, you're having a laugh.
I get on average 36 miles per gallon, I have just had a charge point installed at home so will start charging it at home when I get the car back, I hit a deer recently and it is away being repaired.
The range of the car is really useful, a 45 litre tank with the low fuel warning coming on 300 miles after filling up. I have to fill it every day I go out in it, one day when I had travelled up to Scotland, I had to fill it twice.
As for the charge points at motorway service areas, they used to be free, they now charge £6 a time for charging, with a 32 mile range on a full charge, £6 charging fee will about buy a gallon of petrol which will take me a similar distance.
There are charge points in supermarket car parks but this means leaving the motorway, finding the charge point, plugging in and waiting 25 minutes for it to charge. If I am going somewhere, I want to get there.
I must look on the bright side, the tax deducted from my salary has dropped nicely and I am getting a lot more Morrisons reward points since having the Outlander.
All makes - The future of Company Cars - Terry W

Many are bemoaning the lot of sales reps who may have to spend 5 mins every day/other day fillling up. Not only is 5 mins a trivial amount of time, the number of reps who routinely do 1000-1500 miles a week are low.

Were this not the case there would be a huge number of approx 2 year old cars on the market with 100-150k on the clock. To illustrate - there are 4031 Ford Focuses on Autotrader from 2014 and 2015. There are just 38 with more than 80k. Insignia - 1551 vs 79.

I sympathise with those who have to pend 20 + hours a week driving and then trying to do the day job when thay stop - but it is not the range issue which drives up number of diesels.

All makes - The future of Company Cars - gordonbennet
Without getting too political, this government is clinging on by the skin on their teeth - alienating half the electorate currently running diesels would be the last straw.

I agree, with the worsening problems in our country and its fractured society i would hope politicians will reorganise their priorities.

The dementia tax farce proved just how quickly they will find reverse gear when needs be.

All makes - The future of Company Cars - RT
Without getting too political, this government is clinging on by the skin on their teeth - alienating half the electorate currently running diesels would be the last straw.

I agree, with the worsening problems in our country and its fractured society i would hope politicians will reorganise their priorities.

The dementia tax farce proved just how quickly they will find reverse gear when needs be.

They found neutral, not reverse - they're still planning to tax at 100% compared to the 40% of Inheritance Tax.

 

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