Any - Track Rod End Grease Choice - edlithgow

One of my track rod end ball joint rubbers has a fine crack and is weeping some grease. Doesn't seem to be excess play in it yet, though the rubber looks quite degraded in closup.

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I'm thinking of injecting some more grease and wrapping/supergluing/RTVing it to buy a bit of time. There is no grease nipple.

I've never heard rubber compatibility mentioned in this context, or for CV joint boots, where I'd think it might also be relevent.

Though not as critical as with brakes, I'd expect mineral-oil base greases to attack rubber.

Do they use oil-resistant rubber (viton etc) for these components, or are they just accepted to have a limited life partly due to oil attack?

Assuming it doesn't have to be rubber-compatible, I'd think a moly grease might be best for this application, though I can't remember seeing the grease specified, and these ones are supposed to be sealed-for-life.

I've seen molybdenum grease here (in Taiwan) but only unknown Chinese brands. The 3M stuff I have is pink and so probably doesn't have molybdenum in it. It was the closest I could find to recognisable (and the most expensive), though I suppose it could be fake.

Edited by edlithgow on 04/05/2017 at 11:54

Any - Track Rod End Grease Choice - RichardW

You can buy new rubbers fairly cheaply - I was going to say just fit a new joint as they are about a tenner, but the split pin makes me think this might be something older where replacement might not be so readily available? Any std grease will do.

Any - Track Rod End Grease Choice - Cyd

Castrol MS3 molybdenum disulphide loaded lithium grease would be ideal but is hard to get hold of now.

Go to your local bike shop and get a small tube of bearing grease. One reviewer even mentions using BikeHut Bike Grease from Halfords for this purpose.

Buy a new rubber

wipe off any dirty grease once the old rubber is off (do not wash off). Apply new grease and work in.

reassemble. Job jobbed.

Any - Track Rod End Grease Choice - bathtub tom
Buy a new rubber

Have you seen the number of different shapes and sizes of rubbers?

Probably cheaper and easier to buy a new balljoint.

Any - Track Rod End Grease Choice - focussed

Here it is - "The poor man's tie rod end or balljoint boot"

www.instructables.com/id/Poor-mans-tie-rod-end-or-.../

Any - Track Rod End Grease Choice - edlithgow

Thanks all.

Surprisingly little info on grease selection for this job available on the internyet. From quite a lot of poking around, all I could find was:-

www.300cforums.com/forums/tech-tips-diy-how/114874...l

"NOTE - When you service a serviceable ball joint with a Zerk fitting, make sure you add silicon grease only!"

I suppose this is an acknowledgement of the rubber compatability problem, which seems to be generally ignored. No indication of what type of silicon grease, but I couldn't get it here anyway.

(Can't think of any reason why a servicable joint would be different, except that people aren't supposed to put grease in non-servicable joints so the question doesn't arise}

On an air-cooled VW site I found:-

www.vw-resource.com/lubrication.html

"I use a moly-based grease for CV's, tie-rods and ball-joints, a lithium-based grease for the torsion-bar and steering knuckles."

VERY slim chance of finding anyone in the trade in Taiwan who would know or care about such distinctions, and recognisable greases don't seem to be available..

I did find one product, "Liki Hara" grease, which had some English on it, in fact it said "Made Product American" on the label.

Perhaps they mean they'd made the product seem American by writing bad English on the packaging, appealing to a more redneck-wannabe customer base?

This was one of the few I found which gave any clue as to what was in it, though a rather enigmatic one

"Moly none (3%). "

I'd guess their made-American corporate lawyers have a lot of fun cooking up product descriptions like that.

That's currently my best shot at a molybdenum grease, so maybe I'll just use the 3M lithium stuff.

Re the other (non-improvised) spare and repair suggestions, useful background but they'll probably have to wait until some contact with a tool using culture.

My GF is in Barcelona at the moment which would fit that description, but she'd probably find such enquiries a bit too challenging in Spanish.

Edited by edlithgow on 05/05/2017 at 03:19

Any - Track Rod End Grease Choice - galileo

Ed, there is white grease sold for lubricating airguns which is compatible with the rubber seals they have - any gunshops where you are based?

Any - Track Rod End Grease Choice - edlithgow

Ed, there is white grease sold for lubricating airguns which is compatible with the rubber seals they have - any gunshops where you are based?

They do airsoft so maybe.

However, I should make it clear that I don't know rubber incompatability is a problem, though I can't see why it wouldn't be unless they use more oil resistant rubber than is used for brakes.

I've never seen it discussed, AT ALL, ANYWHERE, for track rod boots or CV gaiters, which is a bit odd considering the endless discussion on the internyet about motor oil choice, which (IMO) is usually a no brainer / non issue.

If it is a problem, it still may not matter as much as the lubricant performance, which might be why it is generally ignored and people go for a molybdenum grease.

I suppose the optimum might be a silicone grease with molybdenum in it. I dunno if this exists but if it does its a fair bet I couldn'y get it here.

Any - Track Rod End Grease Choice - edlithgow

Incidentally, the quotes in my last but one post have all disappeared, so it now makes rather less sense.

They were in bold italic surrounded by "quotation marks". Maybe that's too complicated for the software.

I just did a "like this" and it disappeared before my very eyes.

Think you've got a bug.

"like this"

Any - Track Rod End Grease Choice - galileo

Surely CV joint gaiters are made of oil/grease resistant rubber, at least the OEM ones will be, cheap aftermarket ones maybe less resistant.

Any - Track Rod End Grease Choice - edlithgow

Surely CV joint gaiters are made of oil/grease resistant rubber, at least the OEM ones will be, cheap aftermarket ones maybe less resistant.

Dunno. They do fail, and I wonder if attack by oil is part of the reason for the failures. A CV gaiter is quite a large item, and I believe highly resistant rubber (e.g. viton) is relatively expensive.

If they are resistant, I'd wonder "how resistant"?

It seems to be generally accepted that you don't use oil-based greases on brake systems, though I'd bet quite a lot of money that they do here, and I have personal experience of British mechanics doing so on my 5 ton truck wheel cylinders.

These rubber components (apart from the hoses which wouldn't normally be greased) are much smaller so any additional costs of oil-resistance would be relatively low, yet it apparently isn't done.

I'd wonder why (or if) they use less oil resistant rubber on brake systems than elsewhere.

If I had to guess, I'd bet its all the same, but brake failures are considered less acceptable.

Edited by edlithgow on 06/05/2017 at 01:25

 

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