Volkswagen Tiguan - Volkswagen scandal: pro or a con for buying? - Pondlife

I'll probably be changing my Honda CRV this year, as it's ten years old now and getting a bit tatty. It's a 2.0 petrol auto, and while it's no ball of fire, it's been a good reliable car.

I'm looking at the Volkwagen Tiguan, and I'm wondering what the views are of the effect the emissions scandal will have on prices. Are dealers keener to discount (a good thing), or will the main effect be on the second-hand resale prices in a few years time (a bad thing).

If it matters, whatever I get will be a petrol auto.

Volkswagen Tiguan - Volkswagen scandal: pro or a con for buying? - RobJP

I suspect it will make no or minimal difference.

However, I am mystified as to why you'd buy a VW compared to the equivalent SEAT or Skoda. The VW is more expensive, comes with 1 years roadside assistance, the others get it for the full 3 years of the warranty. In addition, (most) VW dealers are notorious for their shoddy customer service, whereas it seems that Skoda dealers in particular tend to garner a fair bit of praise.

Volkswagen Tiguan - Volkswagen scandal: pro or a con for buying? - Pondlife

The Tiguan is mainly my wife's current first choice, and she'll be the person who drives it most. But I must admit I'd not considered SEAT or Skoda, and I'll have a look a their small SUVs.

Volkswagen Tiguan - Volkswagen scandal: pro or a con for buying? - SLO76
By that I assume you're thinking of the diesel? Also since your CRV is an automatic are you planning on buying another auto?

What sort of money are you thinking of spending and what is your normal weekly usuage and rough annual mileage?

The Tiguan sells well and the emissions scandal has had no noticeable effect on used prices as far as I've seen so don't expect dealers to be throwing money at you to deal.

Edited by SLO76 on 09/04/2017 at 14:39

Volkswagen Tiguan - Volkswagen scandal: pro or a con for buying? - Pondlife
By that I assume you're thinking of the diesel?

No, I'll get Petrol. the Honda does about 12k miles per year, which is probably not quite enough to justify diesel. I also drive in and around London, and there's talk about a diesel tax or ban. It's only talking about older diesels at the moment, but who knows what might happen in the future?

Also since your CRV is an automatic are you planning on buying another auto?

Yes, it's got to be auto. I'm OK with either auto or manual, but my wife will be driving most of the miles and she far prefers an auto. I've never tried a DSG, but I've not heard much good said of them, so I'll probably steer clear of that option.

What sort of money are you thinking of spending and what is your normal weekly usuage and rough annual mileage?

For new, maybe 30k. But I might look at nearly new to bring that down a bit. I'm also a director of a VAT registered company, so I might consider leasing and reducing my salary to compensate as that could be more tax efficient.

The Tiguan sells well and the emissions scandal has had no noticeable effect on used prices as far as I've seen so don't expect dealers to be throwing money at you to deal.

I wasn't expecting dealers to be bending over to pick the soap up, but I was wondering if they might be trying extra hard to meet their targets and hence have more room for discounts.

Volkswagen Tiguan - Volkswagen scandal: pro or a con for buying? - SLO76
Leasing would make sense for you, I do the same with our CRV. I spent time shopping around online for the best deals then called Honda dealers within reasonable range to see if any would match it and one did meaning I'm dealing with a trusted firm and have a point of contact other than a call centre or office goodness knows where. It was over £60 a month less than Honda wanted initially but the leasing rates on petrol SUV's aren't usually as keen as the diesels which are still more popular among business users. We found the 2.0 petrol was no cheaper than the vastly more economical and torquier 1.6 DTEC but our usage would've steered us that way anyway.

VW's DSG box is nice in operation. It suits the Tiguan well and has no detrimental effect on economy or overall performance but it does hesitate on rapid standing starts. I've never felt this was a problem for me in any I've driven and I've not had a shot of the latest model so it may be better.

They don't however have a great reputation for longevity with countless cases of expensive failures documented so dealers do tend to hit them harder than manuals when you come to trade in with higher margins expected to offset the risk of gearbox problems particularly with older examples. The manual boxes are largely robust and pleasant to use.

If you're buying it yourself and intend on longterm ownership I'd go manual but if you're buying or leasing for say 3-4yrs then there's no reason to avoid the DSG.

The current model has several petrol options, all are good and even the base 123bhp 1.4 TSi will outsprint your old CRV. I'd up the ante a little and go for the 148bhp version of the same. It has a bit more poke but similar economy. I've heard only good things about the latest TSi engines to date but I doubt it'll last to doomsday like the normally asperated 2.0 VTEC in your old CRV.
Volkswagen Tiguan - Volkswagen scandal: pro or a con for buying? - Stanb Sevento

Just a comment Pondlife on the VW / Seat / Skoda thing. I run a Saran SEL 64 Plate and when looking round to buy everyone said get the Alhambra, its better value with better spec. Well thats only partly true looking at list price, but in reality its more complex and doing a spec for spec comparison is something that took an hour at a desk with the brochures. The Alhambra was slightly dearer for the car I wanted but came with electric doors and tailgate that I positivly did not want - too noisy, too slow and frustrating. Add to this the VW dealer being much more willing to dig deep with the discount than Seat and it was a no brainer, new factoty order VW for the price of a pre-reg Seat.

Im not saying it will always be like that but its worth looking into.

VW showrooms are thin on petrol models at the moment probably because of the new engines in the pipeline, the new 1.5 TSi Evo miller cycle engine due in May in the Mk 7.5 Golf and will work its way into the Tiguan and Passat. VW will get it first then a few months or a year later into Seat then Skoda is the usual pattern.

Volkswagen Tiguan - Volkswagen scandal: pro or a con for buying? - Pondlife
VW showrooms are thin on petrol models at the moment probably because of the new engines in the pipeline, the new 1.5 TSi Evo miller cycle engine due in May in the Mk 7.5 Golf and will work its way into the Tiguan and Passat. VW will get it first then a few months or a year later into Seat then Skoda is the usual pattern.

That's very useful info, thanks. I wasn't aware that there was a new petrol engine, but I had noticed a lack of petrol models around, and this explains why. I guess VW don't want to be left with an excess of cars with the old engine that they'd need to deeply discount.

I'm not sure I like the sound of a 1.5 engine in an auto though. I've never driven a turbocharged car, but I drive a 1.5 auto occasionally in Malaysia (a Proton Wira) and it's just horrible: feels about as powerful as a scooter. Everyone drives auto there, as the jams in KL are pretty bad, but IMO a 1.5 engine is happier in a manual.

Volkswagen Tiguan - Volkswagen scandal: pro or a con for buying? - badbusdriver
VW showrooms are thin on petrol models at the moment probably because of the new engines in the pipeline, the new 1.5 TSi Evo miller cycle engine due in May in the Mk 7.5 Golf and will work its way into the Tiguan and Passat. VW will get it first then a few months or a year later into Seat then Skoda is the usual pattern.

That's very useful info, thanks. I wasn't aware that there was a new petrol engine, but I had noticed a lack of petrol models around, and this explains why. I guess VW don't want to be left with an excess of cars with the old engine that they'd need to deeply discount.

I'm not sure I like the sound of a 1.5 engine in an auto though. I've never driven a turbocharged car, but I drive a 1.5 auto occasionally in Malaysia (a Proton Wira) and it's just horrible: feels about as powerful as a scooter. Everyone drives auto there, as the jams in KL are pretty bad, but IMO a 1.5 engine is happier in a manual.

You remind me of my mate, after buying a fiat bravo a few years ago, when i asked him what engine it had, he said it was just a 1.4 petrol. Turned out it was the top of the range turbo with about 150bhp!.

Im assuming you dont like the sound of a 1.5 petrol with automatic because it is 'only a 1.5'?. It is actually 1.5 turbo, which is not the same at all, and assuming it will be available in the same power outputs as the golf (which i have just been reading about), it will have either 130bhp or 150bhp. Both versions will have considerably more torque (pulling power) at considerably lower rpm than your CRV. But, and i dont think this has been made clear, you dont get the option of a 'proper' auto, it is either dsg or manual, and as SLO says, the dsg gearbox does not have a great reputation.

You might want to have a look at the mazda CX3 or CX5. Both seem to have been well recieved by the motoring press and are very nice looking cars. Plus, mazda's in general are much more reliable than VW's.

Volkswagen Tiguan - Volkswagen scandal: pro or a con for buying? - SLO76
There's also a new CRV imminent which will feature an all new 190bhp 1.5 turbo that will make your old 2.0 feel like it's powered by coal. This engine is already in the new UK built Civic and has been well received. Knowing Honda and the fact that they're late to the downsizing forced induction party it's likely they'll be thoroughly tested and will prove as robust as any other Honda engine.

Big weakness of the current model is the limited options you have if you want an auto. It's either the flaccid but reliable 2.0 petrol (lacks torque in such a big car) or the costly 1.6 twin turbo diesel and 4wd. The excellent single turbo 1.6 diesel is strong enough to cope with it and it would have been popular with an auto option, I'd certainly have opted for it. So I'm not sure what engines and specs will be available with the auto on the new car but it is due this year. Certainly worth waiting on if your own is still running fine but also means there will be deals on the current model to shift stock. Every Honda dealer has rows of the things because they're their best selling car in the U.K. next to the Jazzwww.autoexpress.co.uk/honda/cr-v/97872/new-honda-c...w





 

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