The spy in the cab - expat

Connected electronics in your car send data back to the makers enabling them to sell it to advertisers and your car insurance company. Mind you I expect that your phone can already do similar stuff.

www.autoblog.com/2017/02/24/tv-vizio-privacy-car-d.../

George Orwell stuff. Most likely you won't be able to switch it off without invalidating your warranty. Another reason to stick with older cars as long as we can.

The spy in the cab - RobJP

So, basically the article is full of speculation, and then you speculate on the speculation - making it even more wildly speculative, by imagining that these possible future electronics might be doing all those things, and then imagining that you won't be able to disable them without invalidating your warranty.

I'll worry about it when it happens. I've no intention of 'borrowing trouble' from the future, I might as well worry about whether skynet (or Trump) is going to annihilate us all tomorrow if I go down that route.

The spy in the cab - Badspanner

Its called "Big Data" and its happening, one of (if not the biggest) commodities being traded around. You have a device that collects a massive amount of data. Everyting from locations travelled, time, speed and even down to which way round you park your car on drive (inbuilt compass?). Most of data collected seems pointless, but to some companies, ie insurance, would love to know if your car is pointing North or South on the street outside every night or pointing East or West on your drive that you claim it does. They would pay quite a high price for such data if it ment not paying out on a claim. Other companies may be intrested that your car often travels into a city centre, stays overnight and travels back next day, i'm sure people like Travel Lodge would like that data, and maybe even send you subtle hints to cheap rooms, lets say by the advert banner at the top of this page? The main question is, is it such a bad thing?

The spy in the cab - FP

"...to some companies, ie insurance, would love to know if your car is pointing North or South on the street outside every night or pointing East or West on your drive that you claim it does. They would pay quite a high price for such data if it ment not paying out on a claim."

I find it fairly hard to take this seriously.

The spy in the cab - RobJP

I find it fairly hard to take this seriously.

Ditto. It smacks of tinfoil hats.

The spy in the cab - Badspanner

Extreme example, yes. But such data is collectable, and sellable. Admiral Insurance has just been stopped using Facebook data to load drivers premiums. Such data as young peoples use of "OMG!!" and not been specific as to meeting times ect, indicating that the user is overly confident and unorganised and therfore more of a risk.

www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/nov/02/admiral...s

The spy in the cab - RobJP

Extreme example, yes. But such data is collectable, and sellable. Admiral Insurance has just been stopped using Facebook data to load drivers premiums. Such data as young peoples use of "OMG!!" and not been specific as to meeting times ect, indicating that the user is overly confident and unorganised and therfore more of a risk.

www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/nov/02/admiral...s

Again, it was entirely voluntary, and the Grauniad article even says so ...

Admiral says that firstcarquote offers a way for young drivers to identify themselves as safe rather than having to wait years while they build up a track record and a no claims bonus.

Dan Mines, who led the firstcarquote project at Admiral, denied that it was invasive of personal data.

“It is incredibly transparent. If you don’t want to use it in a quote then you don’t have to,” he said. “We are doing our best to build a product that allows young people to identify themselves as safe drivers.”

Mines said Admiral could eventually develop the scheme further, meaning it could include other social media sites and increase the price of insurance for some drivers.

The spy in the cab - John Boy

"Spy In The Cab" was a term coined by lorry drivers to refer to tachographs, but I can think of at least one who doesn't view them in that way. Obviously, I'm not going into this, but, in one of my jury service sessions, we were able to use tachograph evidence to find a lorry driver not guilty of a serious charge. He looked terrified in court, but I won't forget the look of relief on his face when the verdict was read out. A lorry driver friend tells me that this kind of court case and outcome is not an isolated incident.

At the same time, I'm ambivalent about some suggestions in the article. For instance, I know someone who is very vocal about politics on Facebook. A lot of his anger is directed at Donald Trump, so it wouldn't surprise me if he was denied entry to the States in the future.

The spy in the cab - Bilboman

The spy in the cab is frankly the least of our worries (that is, the worries of the cynical, sceptical and paranoid readers' group of which I will happily claim membership!)
The extent of CCTV and ANPR coverage in the UK, plus widespread use of dashcams without a second's thought of privacy and Data Protection issues never fail to amaze me. And yet only a minority in Britain seems to want ID cards or even require drivers to carry a driving licence or any of the usual documents on their person or in the car.
Just as one example which I do not believe is insanely paranoid - a dashcam-equipped car driving past a school at closing time will photograph and retain images of dozens, maybe hundreds, of children's faces without their parents' knowledge, less still permission, and these images can be used for whatever purposes the driver chooses.

Edited by Bilboman on 28/02/2017 at 21:02

The spy in the cab - Mike H


Just as one example which I do not believe is insanely paranoid - a dashcam-equipped car driving past a school at closing time will photograph and retain images of dozens, maybe hundreds, of children's faces without their parents' knowledge, less still permission, and these images can be used for whatever purposes the driver chooses.

I think that's insanely paranoid, I think we have to accept that most of the population are normal. Having a dashcam itself could be construed as paranoid.

The spy in the cab - RobJP


Just as one example which I do not believe is insanely paranoid - a dashcam-equipped car driving past a school at closing time will photograph and retain images of dozens, maybe hundreds, of children's faces without their parents' knowledge, less still permission, and these images can be used for whatever purposes the driver chooses.

I think that's insanely paranoid, I think we have to accept that most of the population are normal. Having a dashcam itself could be construed as paranoid.

Agreed, it does seem a little bit excessively paranoid. The people are on the street, in a public area. A person could just as easily take pictures surreptitiously with a smartphone, or a decent long lens on a good DSLR from a few hundred yards away.

The spy in the cab - Bilboman

I can see the advantages of dashcams but there surely needs to be a proper regulatory framework before they become standard fitment, e.g. maximum time of filming allowed and automatic deletion of old footage where there has not actually been a crash. The "Connected Cam" option of the Citroën C3 may start off as a nice USP gadget, but it could easily become something a bit more sinister; at the very least, with the option to click a dashboard button to take a still photograph whilst on the move it is an accident waiting to happen!
In many European countries, there is no automatic right to film or photograph (or retain copies of recorded material of) people in public places and to do so without permission can be a breach of Data Protection and other privacy laws. (In Britain the "default" position is that any public filming or photography is legitimate.)

The spy in the cab - bazza

Some good points in your posts Bilboman. Although as quite a keen photographer, it is my legal right to take a photograph of pretty much anything I like if I am not on private property, even a policeman, barring certain anti terrorist imitiatives. ON private ground, I need in theory to ask the permission of the owner, hence why cameras and the like are banned from school concerts these days, if I recall. Sensible enough as there are a lot of wierdos about, even though it can seem a little draconian, as indeed, most of us folk out there are normal! I am more concerned with the encouragement of the authorities to snitch on each other by handing in dash cam footage of wrong-doing. That is a very slippery slope which we are falling down which smacks of East Germany and the great experiment. There's a very good film, which I think is called "The minds of others" which is worth watching to see what the surveillance state can be like. With the present comedians in charge, it's scary stuff!

 

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