Observation-Seriously unsafe driving habit - Dogfuzz

Both on A and B roads and indeed observed within urban districts, the nasty habit of driving away from the left of the road, right up to the centre if not over the white line facing oncoming traffic. Reason?--to avoid pot holes. Result?- at worst a scraped car, second worse a swerve into the pot hole for the oncoming vehicle.

What's the solution? In an emergency of course I suppose it is good manners to give way entirely by coming to a halt to allow Mr/Mrs Selfish to continue on their royal way --but that risks the oncoming driver being rammed form behind.

Ideas?

Observation-Seriously unsafe driving habit - RT

Ideas?

Don't buy cars with bling wheels - more likely to be damaged by potholes - /65 is the sweet spot for tyre profile IMO

Observation-Seriously unsafe driving habit - SLO76
The desire to gather positive reports from the motoring press has driven manufacturers to firm up suspension and beef up rubber to the great detriment of ride quality meaning even ordinary family cars which once smothered pot holes without breaking teeth are now bone rattling people into swerving around our roads to avoid jolts.

A focus on on the limit handling prowess is fair enough in a super car or barnstorming hot hatch but it's largely undesirable on a family car if it ruins the ride comfort yet the press will hammer any new model that can't tear round a track with hot hatch verve.

Take a drive in a 90's family car like a Cavalier, Carlton, Granada or any big Citroen or Renault to see what comfort we're missing today. I suspect this has more to do with the hysteria over our crumbling roads than the actual state of the roads themselves.
Observation-Seriously unsafe driving habit - John F

Back in the 60s a rough ride was blamed on the road by the English and on the car by the French. Now it seems the English can blame both.

There is clearly a gap in the market for those fat squishy seats and soft suspension on Gallic cars of yore.

Observation-Seriously unsafe driving habit - gordonbennet

Another couple of reasons, though i agree with stupid wheels and concrete springs being a big reason.

So many people are driving cars too big and wide for their competence, you only have to go near a car park to see this in all its glory, helped no end by buying cars with the turning circle of Titanic.

Tailgating, they have to sit on the crown of the road for two reasons, 1. in a vain attempt to intimidate or force the driver in front (who can't go anywhere cos he's following) faster, they try to burn teh driver in front with glare from their eyes. 2. because they are jammed right up the vehicle in front they have no field of vision at all and are too thick to realise why, hence crown of road to see round.

It can be quite amusing if you have one of these idiots behind to travel quite normally for some time, then when you approach a kerbed centre refuge to just skim your offside wheels past it, that sometimes wakes them up.

I followed in fascination a young chap with a young lady passenger one day on the way to work, absolutely torrential rain and this clown is jammed right up the back of this lorry in the maelstrom of storm force spray its kicking up, i sat back about 200 yards and i could barely make the car out at all in that deluge, a future statistic there, hope the young lady finds someone with a brain and moves on before the inevitable, you just know young clown will always drive like this.

JohnF. ''There is clearly a gap in the market for those fat squishy seats and soft suspension on Gallic cars of yore.'',

its been filled by 4x4's that can ride pot holes and don't fall apart or break springs.

Edited by gordonbennet on 17/02/2017 at 12:11

Observation-Seriously unsafe driving habit - Andrew-T

So many people are driving cars too big and wide for their competence, you only have to go near a car park to see this in all its glory, helped no end by buying cars with the turning circle of Titanic.

I suppose the obesity of today's typical car isn't simply due to so many people wanting to own a poor-man's Range Rover. The urge to be able to travel at 80+ mph persuaded makers to widen the track and widen the tread, to enable an increasingly heavy vehicle to stick to the road. Much of the increased weight has been forced by crash safety requirements of many kinds, structural and internal.

Every variant of the Pug 205 (to take a typical 1980s design, and one which I have owned about a dozen of) came in at under a ton. I should think even a Smart may be over that ?

Observation-Seriously unsafe driving habit - madf

The latest Land Rover Defender si 2.2 meters from wing mirror to wing mirror. So too big for most supermarket parking spaces..

"The fifth-gen Discovery is simply one of the world's most capable cars" says Autocar!

Edited by madf on 17/02/2017 at 12:21

Observation-Seriously unsafe driving habit - SLO76
"JohnF. ''There is clearly a gap in the market for those fat squishy seats and soft suspension on Gallic cars of yore.'',

its been filled by 4x4's that can ride pot holes and don't fall apart or break springs."

Thus the reason why I have a Honda CRV but even big SUV's are succumbing to it with most BMW/Audi examples riding like they've bricks instead of rubber and spring beneath them.

The big Honda is a little firmer than I'd like with the aim to eliminate lean through the bends. I'm quite happy leaning a little if it makes for a less brittle ride, some of the most enjoyable drives I've had were in old French tin from the 80's and 90's that would almost scrape their door mirrors on the road on a tight bend.

Edited by SLO76 on 17/02/2017 at 13:21

Observation-Seriously unsafe driving habit - RobJP

It does seem ridiculous, how 4*4s have gone so 'sporty' with suspension and tyre choice.

The 'new' Range Rover, for example (2012 on) comes with a minimum of 20" wheels, and can go up to 22" wheels, which have 40 profile tyres on.

Thankfully, our Shogun has 245/70 R16 fitted. Which leads to a bit of a wallowy ride at times, but the A/T tyres flex and grip on hilly fields or in mud, snow, ice, even when pulling a good-sized Ifor Wms trailer.

Observation-Seriously unsafe driving habit - RichT54

Large alloys and low profile tyres don't help, but some roads seem to regularly develop large potholes that even modestly sized wheels have trouble coping with.

One example in Southampton was resurfaced not too long ago but in the last year large kerbside potholes have been re-appearing again. Is it that the contractors are doing the job on the cheap, or is it just not possible to create a road surface that can withstand the amount and weight of traffic present today?

Observation-Seriously unsafe driving habit - gordonbennet

One example in Southampton was resurfaced not too long ago but in the last year large kerbside potholes have been re-appearing again. Is it that the contractors are doing the job on the cheap, or is it just not possible to create a road surface that can withstand the amount and weight of traffic present today?

let me guess its on a section which is heavily used by the heaviest lorries, main approach to the docks? sorry main exit route, the majority returning lorries will be entering empty save the car transporters going down to gate 4.

its three axle trailers mainly, the vast majority of which don't have a steering axle, they literally rip the road apart on corners, only 8 tons per axle on the typical trailer but you stand beside a tight corner heavily used by such lorries and listen to the sounds those tyres make as they try to pull the surface off.

edit, if you turn a loaded artic like this tight in a premieses without locking the automated manual gearbox from hell in low gear, very often the box will try to change up but the drag from those 4 tyres (front and rear trailer axles) trying to come off the rims is so much that it can stall the engine and drag the lorry back several feet by tyre force alone, imagine what that force is doing to the road every minute of every day.

So'ton now one the three major import routes of containerised or lorry transported foreign made tat, all that vast tonnage constantly wearing the same funnelled bits of road out.

Edited by gordonbennet on 17/02/2017 at 12:51

Observation-Seriously unsafe driving habit - corax

One car I never had the opportunity to sit in was the Jaguar XJ6, always raved about in terms of ride. I'm talking about the old models - mk1 to 3.

Granada, Rover P5B, Triumph saloons, various Citroens even the smaller BX. All superb ride quality.

As much as you hated your SD1 GB, they were very comfortable and spacious. It could have been a great car if built properly. Still miss the dark leather seats on my V8. The electric sun roof even worked on mine.

Are you jealous?

:-)

Observation-Seriously unsafe driving habit - gordonbennet

Good memory Corax, yes nice ride and nice drive, but my 2300 SD1 holds equal first place with 2200 Landcrab as the worse vehicles i was daft enough to buy.

If i have any car regrets its because i didn't simply stick with Japanese from my very first RWD Bluebird estate, which i got rid of basically because it bored me, yes because it never needed anything other than servicing...if i had known then etc.

Probably the nicest riding car with good handling i owned was Rover P6 3500, but i did rebuild the DeDion tube when the bellows split letting the oil out, most people didn't, that car could take speed cushions at 30 mph and you really didn't know you'd gone over one, possibly merc W124's are on a par ride wise especially if you leave them on standard 195/65 x 15's.

Observation-Seriously unsafe driving habit - RT

SD1 was anything but spacious in the front - I'm only 6'0" but my head was against the roof lining and feet reached the bulkhead beyond the pedals - I wouldn't have one at any price - had a Vauxhall Senator instead.

Observation-Seriously unsafe driving habit - bathtub tom

Both on A and B roads and indeed observed within urban districts, the nasty habit of driving away from the left of the road. Reason?--to avoid pot holes.

What's the solution?

I report every pot hole (and unlit street furniture) I see. They get repaired remarkably quickly. I use this website: www.fixmystreet.com/ others are available.

 

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