I Have A Question - Volume 159 - Dynamic Dave

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In this thread you may ask any question for which you need help, advice, suggestions or whatever.

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However, as has been said a couple of times, there is a wealth of knowledge in here, much of which is not motoring related, but most of which is useful.

This is Volume 159. Previous Volumes will not be deleted,

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PLEASE NOTE:

When posting a NEW question, please "Reply to" the first message in this thread, i.e. this one. This keeps each question in it's own separate segment and stops each new question from getting mixed up in amongst existing questions. Also please remember to change the subject header.
Simple Mobile Phones - bintang
I should have made clear (Vol. 158) that my newest Nokia phone only holds its charge for two weeks, even when switched off. My massive old Nokia lasts two months but is too heavy for the pocket. (Incidentally, neither phone carries a model type or number.)
Simple Mobile Phones - Nsar
Have you looked behind the battery - that's where they tend to put the model numbers.
Simple Mobile Phones - buzbee
Simple Mobile Phones As recommended on here previously, Nokia 1101 (was 1100 before they improved the screen back-lighting). Easily lasts 14 days on standby.
Simple Mobile Phones - Dynamic Dave
I should have made clear (Vol. 158) that my newest Nokia phone only holds its charge for two weeks, even when switched off. My massive old Nokia lasts two months but is too heavy for the pocket.


Why not just buy a second battery and keep in your pocket / wallet? or put on charge more frequently?
(Incidentally, neither phone carries a model type or number.)


As Nsar suggests.
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - Marc
Evening everyone. Got a new washing machine delivered today and was surprised that the feed for the hot water supply was blanked off and the instructions only refer to plumbing in a cold supply, it was also only supplied with one hose. The machine basically heats up its own water.

My old machine (a 7 year old Indesit) had two supplies and its instructions said this was preferable to just a cold supply. My new machine is also an Indesit so why the rethink? I'm guessing it's something to do with energy efficiency ratings but can anyone confirm.

Thanks
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - daveyjp
The majority of new machines are now cold water fill only as most of the time there is no need for really hot water to wash clothes - our AEG replaced an old Hoover machine which was hot and cold fill. Detergents are now effective from 30 degrees, hot water supply can be 65+ degrees so you waste energy by heating water which is too hot for the wash cycle anyway.
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - Pugugly {P}
Remember to blank off the hot water supply pipe properly with a copper blanking plate- don't depend on the W/M hose connector - it could fail.
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - Marc
I've been thinking that today. Wouldn't want something under the sink falling over on the lever that's stopped the hot supply.

Can you buy a proper screw on blanking cup from B&Q or similar?
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - defender
I used the old hot hose end ,took the sealing washer out and put a one pence coin in behind it to blank it off and replaced the washer,works perfectly and only cost 1p
what was that about mean scotsmen?
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - Mapmaker
A 'penny washer' is the size of an old penny, so less than half a new penny....

New Washing Machine - hot water supply - henry k
Can you buy a proper screw on blanking cup from B&Q or similar?

>>
Yes. Best to vist the traditional plumbers merchant and just explain what your problem is.
" I want something "simple" to seal off where the now redundant hose for hot water was connected "

IIRC You probably want a Conex blank cap nut.
And maybe some PTFE tape.
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - rustbucket
Can you buy a proper screw on blanking cup from B&Q or similar?

>>
Yes. Best to vist the traditional plumbers merchant and just explain what your problem is.
" I want something "simple" to seal off where the now redundant hose for hot water was connected "

IIRC You probably want a Conex blank cap nut.

You will find the thread on the hose / tap is 3/4 BSP so a conex blank cap will not fit -different thread, there is a proper blanking off fitting available.


--
rustbucket (the original)
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - Stuartli
Our nearly four-year-old Miele washing machine is only cold fill - it heats up to the required temperature very quickly.

As already mentiohed, most modern washing machines are cold fill only.
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What\'s for you won\'t pass you by
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - Pugugly {P}
I got mine from my neighbour (whose an obssesive about things like that) B&Q and Jewsons etc.
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - L'escargot
The majority of new machines are now cold water fill only
as most of the time there is no need for really
hot water to wash clothes .......


Perhaps so. But hot fill shortens the washing cycle significantly and increases the life of the heater element.
--
L\'escargot.
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - Stuartli
>>But hot fill shortens the washing cycle significantly and increases the life of the heater element>>

I completely agree. However, the initial disappointment for the other half was tempered by just how quickly the Miele is up to full steam...:-)

It's all to do with saving water etc apparently - you know, that stuff that falls by the tank load in Scotland and Wales in particuar, but because it's not oil has never been piped around the UK to the areas where it's most wanted.

Mind you, I suppose if United Utilities or Thames Water were in charge of such a pipeline the leaks would nullify the benefits...:-)
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What\'s for you won\'t pass you by
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - Dulwich Estate
I think the change to cold fill only may also have something to do with just how long it takes for so called hot water to get to your machine via the long pipe runs from HW cylinder, combi boiler or whatever. Supposedly it's more efficient to heat the water locally.
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - Robbie
I bought a new washing machine about nine months ago that's a cold fill only. I couldn't believe how much cleaner it got the clothes.

I always seem to spill dinner on my front, and bolognese sauce has always been a devil to get out. The old machine never seemed to remove it properly without a liberal dose of that oxygen bleach stuff on the stain beforehand. The new machine doesn't use much water and removes all stains without adding anything but normal detergent tablets. I don't know why it should make any difference.
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - PhilW
"I bought a new washing machine about nine months ago "

One of those plastic bib things with a "food catcher" at the bottom would have been cheaper
--
Phil
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - deepwith
One thing you must remember to do on a regular basis is to put the machine through on a boil wash particularly if you use low temp washes - this is the only way to clear the gunk left by the detergent in the pipes and bottom of the machine - this causes as many breakdowns as the "hard water" furring. Good for flannels and teatowels too! Also, if you have a new machine it is worth using softening tablets (Lidl do cheap ones) but don't start using them on an older machine as , again, you might block up the pipework .
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - Dulwich Estate
OK so most of us read car magazines from time to time. Maybe it's now the time for an entrepreneur to start "Washing Machine Weekly". Think of the excitement of looking forward to next week's issue - with all those tips. It could be followed by a TV channel on Sky.

Then the manufacturers could start making them in different colours - extra for metallic of course.
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - Pugugly {P}
Yep Dave, with swappable skins, upgradable ECUs, special editions......................................... :-O






and laws were most numerous when the commonwealth was most corrupt. Tacitus, Annals
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - bell boy
washing machine kate bush the new album' aerial' i love it...........
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - Stuartli
>>put the machine through on a boil wash>>

The Miele has the facility to change the lower level of the machine's water capacity and replace it with virgin water...:-)

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What\'s for you won\'t pass you by
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - knowwun
Good Afternoon learned gentlemen.

I am planning a new kitchen. My question is, are modern dishwashers cold fill only, or do they have hot and cold fill.

thanks
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - Rebecca {P}
Cold fill only as far as I'm aware.
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - Dulwich Estate
I think I agree.

PS Watch out for the new colour supplement in the new MW Weekly - Delightful Dishwashers.
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - knowwun
Thank you all.

As I am looking at lots of appliances with respect to kitchen design and fitting I have taken out a subscription to MW weekly on your advice, however I prefer DAM (Domestic Appliances Monthly - the centre fold of Jordan draped over the pull out ironing board is very attractive) or WGW (white goods weekly - they are doing Miele of the Month)
New Washing Machine - hot water supply - rtj70
We replaced a real old (but expensive Bauknecht) dishwasher a few years back. It was cold fill only. It must have been 15 years old at the time. So I think all dishwashers are cold fill only.

To get some more life after getting it repaired the repair man suggested connecting to the hot water. Common problem on dishwashers is with the wires to the control at the top of the door. Opening/closing lead to fatigure and failure and these supply power to heating element etc. So connecting to hot water would mean it didn't have to heat water and increase life etc. Lasted a few years and died.

Current Siemens (i.e. Bosch) says do not connect to hot water. Cleans dishes really well on all programmes (quickest/economy normally used and about 30 minutes). And it's near silent. And take out top tray and you can put in oven trays etc. Very good Bosch/Siemens in my opinion so far.

P.S. Bought one between the Bauknecht and newer Siemens. It was an integrated one and wife wanted one with "brown" controls so cost losts for a cheap one. It lasted a year. Learn from me and buy a decent one. Got 5 years parts and labour on the Siemens for the same price as a Bosch via my local friendly independent seller. and only £50 more than the cheapo one that lasted 13 months...
Lifespan of big constructions - johnny
When major engineering structures are built e.g Suspension bridges, Channel Tunnel etc - what's sort of lifespan are they expected to have? Likewise things such as Victorian cast iron bridges - are they still within their original intended lifespan?
Lifespan of big constructions - Group B
For big civils projects the specified "design life" can be 100+ years, and for the Humber Bridge and Channel Tunnel it was 120 years. This means they should be fit for purpose for a minimum of 120 years, before some major refurbishment or rebuilding is required. They should hopefully last longer than that if a maintenance regime is followed.
I dont know whether the designers of Victorian bridges had an intended lifespan for their constructions?
The Iron Bridge at Ironbridge is still standing after 227 years, but now with limited traffic allowed on it.

However things don't always pan out as intended. The Forth Road Bridge built in the sixties had a design life of 120 years but the cables are currently snapping due to much increased traffic density; and according to this article it may need to be decomissioned in 2014, having lasted only 50 years.

www.thecourier.co.uk/output/2006/11/18/newsstory89...p
news.scotsman.com/scotland.cfm?id=481652005
Lifespan of big constructions - Dalglish
major engineering structures are built e.g Suspension bridges, Channel Tunnel etc - what's sort of lifespan
are they expected to have

>>

as rich 9-3 says, the design life can vary. in the days before computer assisted design became the norm, the calculations used to be done manually (assisted by the slide rule when that was in fashion). engineers used to build in safety/error margins in their calculations depending on the normal standards of the day. nowadays, with supposed advanced in computing power and mathmatical modelling etc., the calculations are supposed to be more accurate and safety/error margins have been reduced (not least to make the product as economic as possible).
in some cases, the assumptions made or the behaviour of concrete/steel or the environment have not been what was expected. examples are corrosion in uk's gas-cooled nuclear power station reactors, and concrete-steel "cancer" corrosion in many sixties/seventies projects.
Lifespan of big constructions - Robin Reliant
Many of the Victorian structures were over-engineered by the standards of today, when as Dalglish says safety margins can be predicted to a very accurate degree.

As they say, "Any fool can build a bridge that will stand up, but it takes an engineer to build a bridge that will only just stand up".
--
Lifespan of big constructions - Nsar
Or wobble.
Lifespan of big constructions - johnny
I'm sure I read somewhere that the Victorian terrace houses ( I live in one BTW ) were only intended to last 30 -40 years - they're certainly more robust than the modern ones.

Anyone know the expected lifespan of the Channel Tunnel ?
Lifespan of big constructions - Pugugly {P}
100 year according to some well buried Hansard report on the thing.
Lifespan of big constructions - rustbucket
>>As they say, "Any fool can build a bridge that will stand up, but it takes an engineer to build a bridge that will only just stand up".
I know which I would prefer.

--
rustbucket (the original)
Lifespan of big constructions - Glaikit Wee Scunner {P}
Wasn't it Colin Chapman's philosophy regarding GP cars that they should only be built well enough to just finish a race.
Otherwise they were over-engineered, ie too heavy and thus too slow. Think quite a few race drivers belatedly found out that was not a good idea.
--
I wasna fu but just had plenty.
Lifespan of big constructions - Robin Reliant
Chapman apparantly once berated a mechanic for fitting washers to the bolts during an engine assembly. He told the fellow that they were adding unnescessary weight to the car.

As someone who throws away the valve caps on cycle innertubes to save weight, I can sympathise. Though it makes naff all difference.
--
Lifespan of big constructions - Number_Cruncher
Bridges like the one in Ironbridge are still standing not because they were built heavily, but because they were built to be predominantly in compression when loaded. In general, fatigue cracks don't grow in compression, and concerns about lifetime are limited by corrosion, which for some materials means a very long life can be ensured.

Despite the pointed use of the description "supposed" when referring to advances in design and technology, what is perhaps being forgotten is that there were many catastrophic failures of structures like bridges and boilers which until the discipline of fracture mechanics was developed, forced the use of large margins of safety - and even these were sometimes unsuccessful.

If there are modern weaknesses in design, I think one of them is that engineers aren't exposed to sufficient materials teaching, and in many cases are barely taught about fracture mechanics. As an example, it came as news to me during a design review this week, that when cleaned with methanol, Titanium parts become weakened via the mechanism of stresscorrosion cracking - luckily, for the parts I am responsible for, I had specified a cleaning technique using propanone rather than methanol, but it was a matter of luck rather than skill on my part.

The other, perhaps obvious, weakness that springs to mind is how much engineering is being done by slavishly following standards and software user manuals. The wobbly bridge complied with the applicable standards, and was properly designed and analysed.

Engineering design software is now almost too easy to use, and I frequently see the results of analysis which are either incorrect in approach, unfit for purpose, or incorrectly interpreted because the analysis software is seen as an add on to a CAD package, and designers are trying to carry out analysis which is beyond their skills.

One other issue that may not be obvious to the layman is that once you have a large or complex structure, you also will have cracks and defects in that structure - even from brand new. The management of these cracks, and the decisions as to whether to monitor, repair, or replace is an expensive and sometimes difficult ongoing task for those responsible for engineered structures like aircraft, trains, ships, oil rigs, nuclear power plants, bridges, etc, etc. The tools for the management of these cracks simply did not exist until comparatively recently - consider, for example the Alexander Keiland disaster in the 70's.

One of the odd things that couldn't have been understood by previous generations of engineers is that due to the statistical distribuion of flaws and defects in even new materials, there is a reduction in the allowable fatigue stress for thick materials, so, as you beef up a part, you rapidly move into a regime of diminishing returns.

Number_Cruncher
Lifespan of big constructions - Pugugly {P}
Would it be fair to say that the two Menai crossings in Wales are over-engineered by their original builders ? I know that there have been changes in the road decks but the basic structures carry weights that were inconceivable to the original designers, Stevenson and Telford. Imagine it the rail crossing carries trains that must be substantially heavier than the originals and then you have the weight of the road deck and all the traffic it carries (yes I know they binned the original tubes after the fire in the 70s).
Lifespan of big constructions - Dalglish
.. the pointed use of the description "supposed" when referring to advances in design and technology ..


number cruncher -
just to clarify. i used the term advisedly. i have been party to negotiations for multi-million pound damage claims arising from such failures in design/manufature/construction/commisioning/operation. howeever, due to client confidentiality as well as legal agreements, i am unable to even hint which "big construction" projects were involved.
Lifespan of big constructions - Number_Cruncher
Well, the supposed advances are *absolutely* real - there's no comparison between the analysis and design techniques available today and those available in yesteryear.

However, there's lots more to engineering than just computer power, modelling and analysis. It's all virtually worthless without some skilled interpretation, and that involves common sense and experience. So, while the analysis techniques today are very accurate and sophisticated, this in itself doesn't guarantee a good design or implementation.

Despite my respect for mathematical analysis, I fight this nonsensical excessive blind dependence upon computer based analysis on an almost daily basis - I'm being pressured (by whom, I cannot say!) to produce analysis results for a system I'm working on which won't really add any value, or reduce any risk for the finished item* - this almost needless analysis work will have to be done at the cost of doing some useful , but less glamorous work which will really reduce the risk of failure. Because aerospace qualification is largely a standards driven, tick-box discipline, I am becoming unpopular in the project for not conforming, and concentrating my efforts where they can make some real improvement to the design.

Number_Cruncher

* some "fag-packet" calculations have already demonstrated that the design is OK, and has plenty of design margin available.

Lifespan of big constructions - malteser
"one pence coin"

ONE PENCE is an impossibility, two or more are not!

Roger. (Costa del Sol, España)
Lifespan of big constructions - Hugo {P}
The Tamar Bridge linking the Town of Saltash to the city of Plymouth along the A38 that was built in 1961 is actually inverior in capcity to a 400 year old stone built single lane bridge on the A390 some 20 miles away, also linking Devon and Cornwall. This 400 year old bridge is actually capable of carrying the biggest commercial vehicles on our roads today with NO strenthening at all, whereas the Tamar Bridge IIRC needed extra bracing to cope with the heavier trucks that have evolved since the 60s.

The design and costrution of the Tamar uses components in both compression and tension (the latter being mainly the steel cables etc IIAR). The 400 year old bridge I refer to is of a design based soley on compression.
Lifespan of big constructions - cheddar
To build on Dalglish's point, and also Hugo's, we are fortunate that 17th, 18th and 19th century bridge builders did not have CAM, if they had they would have built bridges capable of taking a couple of haycarts pulled by shire horses, as it is they massively over engineered the bridges to the extent that many can take 500 horse power 38 tonne articulated trucks.

Lifespan of big constructions - Hugo {P}
CAD to be correct Chedder. CAM is Computer Aided Manufacturing, a term mainly given to CNC machine tools and the like. CAD is Computer Aided Design that has weened draughtpeople off drawing boards to workstations that can not only instantly carry out spacial calcs to help the engineer decide what will fit in where but can also carry out instant stress calcs. It's this technology that Number Cruncher (quite understandably in my opinion) is so scathing about.

As NC says, they are good tools provided that our reliance on them is not total. For example when you learned to use a calculator at school did your teacher suggest that you should always see if the answer is sensible? We don't just take the answer at face value as being right. It has to look realistic.
Lifespan of big constructions - cheddar
CAD to be correct Chedder. CAM is Computer Aided Manufacturing, a
term mainly given to CNC machine tools and the like.


Yes thanks, I meant CAD, I am too used to typing either.

Lifespan of big constructions - Mapmaker
>>If there are modern weaknesses in design, I think one of them is that engineers aren't exposed to sufficient materials teaching, and in many cases are barely taught about fracture mechanics.

Good Lord. If they aren't taught about microscopic phenomena, what hope for them when they try to apply theories macroscopically. Did somebody say 'Comet'?
Lifespan of big constructions - Number_Cruncher
>>Did somebody say 'Comet'?

To give a more recent example, I was thinking about the inappropriate material choice for the support bearings of the motorway bridge over the Manchester ship canal. A grade of stainless steel was used which ordinarily is OK, but which suffers stress corrosion cracking when exposed to a chloride environment (did anybody think that we might be spreading a little salt in winter?). During an inspection one bearing was found with a crack almost all the way through - hence the long running roadworks, while all the bearings were sorted out.

Number_Cruncher

Wormeries?? - wotspur
Wormeries??

With 2 very young children,a lot of food is not always eaten and I've always fancied a way of recycling the foods.
Has anyone got any knowledge on obtaining and settting up a wormery, how effective are they, how much foods can be consumed and how many worms would be required and what care needs to be taken to look after the worms. Any information would be appreciated
Wormeries?? - barchettaman
www.originalorganics.co.uk/wormeries.htm

tinyurl.com/y9dlfd

on ebay.
Wormeries?? - Vin {P}
I moved my wormery indoors for the winter just yesterday. I've been running it for 18 months now, and I have a few comments to make:

1. You must, must, must buy the worms. Earthworms will not do the job.

2. Don't expect vast quantities of compost, but the stuff you get is so fertile you feel you could eat it.

3. If starting again, I wouldn't buy a wormery. They are grossly expensive for what they are. If making your own, three things you need are:

a. Secure sides and top. You'll be putting all kinds of rubbish into the thing, and you really don't want rats getting involved

b. Drainage. The worms will be very unhappy if they are wet. Good drainage is essential.

c. A big surface area. This is where the commercial ones fail. You can have at most about 2 inches of uneaten stuff in there before it starts to stink. The bigger the surface area, the more weekly load it can take. If I had the space, I'd use the liner out of a big chest freezer. The worms will breed to the point where they match the food supply. And, boy, do they breed if they are happy.

If you can move it indoors or keep it warmer in the winter, the worms will be happier - they slow down a great deal in the cold. What also helps all year round is a shredder (though I just put stuff through the blender)

As for your kids, they will love it. Mine can't wait to feed the worms if I ask them: 18 months is much more than their typical attention span, so I'm impressed.

I reckon that with enough surface area I could reduce my waste to glass, metal and plastic only. they would happily eat everything else.

V
Wormeries?? - Vin {P}
Didn't answer one of your questions. I bought half a kilo of worms - which is a pretty astounding volume when you're holding them. They will breed to fit your waste output

Worms from tinyurl.com/y2o76w

They will eat half their weight a day, so 1Kg will eat 500g of waste daily. Did I mention that they will breed like...er...worms? You'll end up with enough for the amount you dispose of daily.

V
Wormeries?? - Onetap
Worms from tinyurl.com/y2o76w


No worms there. Only wormeries, which seem to be a way of selling a plastic dustbin for £60.
I had a worm bin for a year or so, a plastic dustbin with a few of the red brandlings from under any paving stone/ rotting log/ compost heap. They multiplied fast. It seemed to work well, reducing lots of vegetable waste to compost in the year.

What type of worms are the ones you get with the wormeries? Can they be bought without the £60 plastic dustbin?
Wormeries?? - Onetap
Googled
Dendra or Tiger worms are required, from E-Bay (cheapest £5ish for 250 gms), fishing tackle shop or possibly the leaf waste on a forest floor. Add a £10 plastic dustbin, plastic drain tap, sorted.
Wormeries?? - Vin {P}
Ah, OK, type "composting worms" into the search box.

As I said, don't buy a kit. If you do use a dustbin, put a drain tap on it and a few inches of gravel in the bottom for drainage. And remember, it's surface area you want, so a square or rectangular container will maximise area.

V
Wormeries?? - Onetap
Ah, OK, type "composting worms" into the search box.


Thanks, Vin
I'd missed it, got it now The search engine brings up a tiny message about 23 products with 'worms' in the title, instead of pictures. E-Bay seems cheaper for Dendras I'll have to restart mine and get some.
You can get a gift voucher for worms! The ideal present!
Mobile Phone question - Robin
I have just bought a new mobile phone and have found that it comes preprogrammed with some numbers from the network provider. Things like, Customer Care, Flowers and others. I do not want these so I deleted them. However, they always come back after the phone has been switched off. How can I remove them permanently? Of course I will try not to switch the phone off but sometimes the battery does run out.
Mobile Phone question - Dynamic Dave
Might help if you mention what make / model of phone it is.
Mobile Phone question - Robin
It is a Nokia 6070 on the Tesco system.
Mobile Phone question - PoloGirl
Coul it be something to do with them being saved on the SIM and you only deleting them from the phone? You never know when you might need customer care or some flowers!

Nokia 5210 help - Mapmaker
A couple of years ago, I lost my Nokia 5210 (one of those rubber-coated waterproof Nokias) which was on Orange PAYG. I have just found it, and I know there are numbers on there that I would like back off it.

Some of the numbers are on the SIM, some on the phone.

Orange cancelled the SIM for me (but not the phone as I hadn't bought it from them and didn't know the IMEI no).

If I turn the phone on, will the numbers on the SIM be lost? Do I need to go to a tube station before I switch on?

Many thanks.
Nokia 5210 help - Pugugly {P}
Mapmaker,

I had a similar problem, I bought an el cheapo SIM reader from fleabay which read the data (off the phone) and uploaded it to a bit of software and then transferred it onto my new SIM. It was dead simple and no need ot power the SIM up to do it.
Nokia 5210 help - Dalglish
... SIM reader


or even try a home landline phone such as this one (if you or your friends have one)

www.shop.bt.com/invt/caw122
The stylish Relate 2100 is the first corded telephone in the UK with a SIM card reader & writer ...
Nokia 5210 help - Pugugly {P}
That's handy.
Nokia 5210 help - Dynamic Dave
Mapmaker,

Your provider cancelling the SIM won't have any bearing on whats stored on it, or the phone. The numbers will still be stored on the SIM and in the phone; as well as any txt messages. All you'll likely to get when you switch the phone on is a message stating something like 'SIM registration failed' because it is no longer registered to a network.
Nokia 5210 help - Mapmaker
Thanks. So DD, what do you think would happen if I put the SIM into my Orange SPV and then synched it with Outlook? Would the numbers on the SIM move across to Outlook... and then if I put my normal SIM back in, they'd instantly be on my current phone?



Nokia 5210 help - Robbie
You should be able to put the sim in your new phone and transfer the data to that. I changed my 'phone last year and transferred the numbers on my old sim card to my new one. My old 'phone was an ancient Ericsson and my new one a Sony Ericsson.
Nokia 5210 help - Dynamic Dave
As Robbie says.

I changed from a Nokia 6230 earlier this year to a Nokia N70. The N70 needed a new SIM card as the one out of my 6230 wasn't 3G enabled.

I put the old SIM in the N70 and transferred all the numbers off of it to the phone's address book, then put the new SIM in afterwards.

That aside, not sure about your new phone, but with the N70 it defaults to the phone's address book for the phone numbers when you do a search, rather than any of the numbers on the SIM card. In effect the SIM is only in the phone so that you can connect to the phone network through it. I have copied the majority of the numbers from the phone to the SIM however, purely as a backup, but none of the additional data (such as extra numbers for one person, addresses, email addresses, and the like) that are stored in the phone address book are transferred onto the SIM, it's only the number that will get stored.
Good hotel in Rome - Happy Blue!
Taking SWMBO away for tenth wedding anniversary and she has chosen Rome, We want a nice 4-star hotel within the 00186 post code district or between the Forum and Vatican. Any recommendations?
Good hotel in Rome - tyro
I take it that you have had a look on www.tripadvisor.com?
(I have found it very helpful indeed for hotel recommendations.)
Good hotel in Rome - Armitage Shanks {p}
Totally with tyro on this one! Reports are written by people who have stayed so you are not just reading the hotel brochure! Sometimes you find somebody who obviously had a bad stay but if they are 1 out of 15 reports you can guess that they were unlucky or in a bad mood = hard to please.
Good hotel in Rome - Group B
I took my girlfriend there in April, I booked a hotel through this website (good one imo), and it all went smoothly: en.venere.com/hotels_rome/

Sorry I cannot recommend a hotel; we stayed in a pleasant one which was good v.f.m., but located in the slightly dodgy Termini Station area.
Good hotel in Rome - Happy Blue!
I've looked on tripadvisor and its very good, so I think I have selected one and will use venere to book

Ta
Good hotel in Rome - rtj70
I've found hotels on Venere before and before booking thought.... I wonder how much if I book directly with the hotel. So I'd phone up and surprise surprise they are sometimes cheaper than booking via the web.

If you've found a hotel you like you could also check out prices via some of the airline website links to HotelConnect:

jet2.hotelconnect.co.uk/Booking/HotelSearch.aspx

You might find one on offer.
Old Ordnance Survey maps - L'escargot
On old Ordnance Survey maps what does a small circle with short outwardly radiating lines signify?
--
L\'escargot.
Old Ordnance Survey maps - spikeyhead {p}
I think its a lookout point
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I read often, only post occasionally
Old Ordnance Survey maps - L'escargot
I think its a lookout point


Who for, and what were they looking out for?
--
L\'escargot.
Old Ordnance Survey maps - PhilW
Tumulus (Often labled as such also)
Lookout point (viewpoint???) much bigger, in blue, rays in direction of view and only on newer maps
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Phil
Old Ordnance Survey maps - terryb
Yes, on old 1 inch maps it can be a tumulus. There should be the word "tumulus" or "tumuli" if more than one, in gothic type, close by too. Can also be other ancient earthworks, my old Brecon sheet for instance has one labelled as "mound" and some as "cairns" and another a "Y Cefn" - whatever that is in English!
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Terry
Old Ordnance Survey maps - mare
I *think* cefn = forest. A couple of BR's are Welsh speakers, maybe they can translate
Old Ordnance Survey maps - PhilW
cefn apparently means "ridge"
See OS website for origin of Welsh placenames
www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/freefun/didyouk...f
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Phil
Old Ordnance Survey maps - L'escargot
The reason I asked is that a friend has about a quarter of one in the corner of her garden. Her neighbour has another quarter and the remainder (on the other side of the hedge) has been removed. It's about 1.5 metres high and about 6 metres diameter. It's sited at the highest point in the village, (although that may be a coincidence) and is clearly man-made. It's marked on old maps solely by the circle with radiating lines ~ no script.

My 1920s (!) dictionary says that tumuli are usually sepulchral.
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L\'escargot.
Old Ordnance Survey maps - PhilW
I also always understood they were ancient graves (barrows) from Neolithic times - but my memory might be faulty - there are a lot on Moors in N Yorks where I grew up.
Maybe there's buried treasure under that thar mound!

Just found this by Googling!!

"Lexden Tumulus
Iron Age Burial Mound in Essex
Lexden Tumulus is late iron age, being dated to around 10 BC. It is thought to be the grave of Addedomarus, king of the native Trinovantes. The grave goods give an insight into the extent of Romanisation of the local aristocracy more than 50 years before the Claudian invasion. There were 17 wine jars, chain mail and a coin of Augustus struck in 17 BC which had been mounted as a portrait medallion. Other items included a statuette of Cupid and figurines of bull, boar and griffin. Trade with Roman Gaul was already influencing fashions among the rich. It is situated in the front gardens of 36 and 30, Fitzwalter Road, Lexden which is a suburb of Colchester."
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Phil
Old Ordnance Survey maps - Pugugly {P}
cefn apparently means "ridge"

I'll remember that the next time I go to Cefn Meiriadog - a magical place within a few miles of Rhyl's urbanized glories, a different world with a nice windy BMW (1200) friendly road..........
Retired tax liability / over paid tax ? - cheddar
Further to my earlier question regarding Probate, the deceased's spouse fears that they have have paid too much tax on some annuites via tax deducted by the annuity company at source, I tend to agree, they have been paying 22% however their total income exc pensions is well below the threshold. Any thoughts on how to calculate the tax liabilty for a retired person/couple with state and private pension income, annuities and interest on savings accounts?

Also how many years can you go back if asking Revenue & Customs to re calculate tax paid?


Thanks.
Retired tax liability / over paid tax ? - Dalglish
1. Any thoughts on how to calculate the tax liabilty for a retired person/couple ..
2. Also how many years can you go back if asking Revenue & Customs to re calculate tax paid?


1. the revenue are generaly very helpful, and most of the help you might need may be found at the excellent www.hmrc.gov.uk website.

2. usually six years

Moss removal - mini 30 owner
Anyone know of an effective way of removing moss from uneven concrete surfaces?

It's getting slippy crossing the yard if you wear the wrong shoes! I'd rather not spend a lot on chemical solutions and scraping it all off with a spade, while effective, is exhausting.

Bleach, vinegar, eye of newt? Any old wives' solutions appreciated
Moss removal - Vin {P}
Soot. Find someone with a chimney or call a sweep. Sprinkle it very, very thinly over the moss. It'll die off in no time.

V
Moss removal - Group B
Anyone know of an effective way of removing moss from uneven
concrete surfaces?


Jetwash? But just remembered you live down south, have they lifted the hosepipe ban yet?
Moss removal - Stuartli
Jeyes Fluid is very effective in killing off the moss - clean the concrete afterwards with a pressure jet spray if necessary.
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What\'s for you won\'t pass you by
Moss removal - Stuartli
Re Jeyes Fluid. See:

www.jeyes.co.uk/htm/jeyes-fluid.htm

Served us well for years.
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What\'s for you won\'t pass you by
Moss removal - mini 30 owner
Ta V much - Still got the hosepipe ban so the jetwash is out - I'll try the soot first and if that fails. it's down to the Jeyes

Cheers all
Moss removal - helicopter
Mini - check with your local water provider as I believe they will allow jetwash for patios and driveways where slippery because of moss or algae.

Its something to do with the ubiquitous ' health and safety ' and the fact that they may be sued if someone slips over and hurts themselves because you have been unable to use a jetwash because of their ban..

Moss removal - helicopter
In fact I just phoned the Southern Water helpline and they confirm that you can use a jetwasher to clear moss from your drive or patio for Health and Safety reasons.

As they were talking on the helpline in a recorded announcement about a 10 inch burst main in Canterbury area I don't suppose spraying a few gallons on my drive in Sussex is going to make a lot of difference.

Moss removal - henry k
As they were talking on the helpline in a recorded announcement about a 10 inch burst main in Canterbury area.....

>>
Well yet another 48 inch main has gone pop in my area today.( a frequent happening as there are so many within the area)
The lunch time local TV news crew were there.
news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/6158883.stm

I will certainly be using a hose on my north facing patio.


Moss removal - mini 30 owner
Cheers helicopter - much appreciated
Moss removal - Dude - {P}
A solution of copper sulphate (available from most garden centres) is probably the most effective tratment against moss and is also ideal for spraying onto roof tiles to clear it up.
Moss removal - JH
S
Jeyes fluid is very effective at killing the moss but it doesn't remove the residue. I end up with dead, black moss. Scrubbing with a yardbrush removes some but not all and it's exhausting work. Which probably means it's good for me :-(.
JH
Moss removal - Hugo {P}
Get yourself a floor scraper from a builders merchant.

They cost about £10 and can be used for a variety of jobs around the house. I use mine for scraping walls and ceilings to remove high points off Artex before skimming over it.
 

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