GDI Engines - Ford - chesterfieldhouse

Related to my shortlist of a replacement motor in the New Year, but l thought l'd start off another thread as this is specific to Ford & the GDI Ecoboost engines.

Looking at possible estates (petrol) around 8-10 years old, the Focus fitted with the 1.0 ltr Ecoboost engine starts to come into budget. Sounds impressive in the specs' in terms of performance, economy & diesel like torque.

However, l know on this forum there are mixed views as to the reliability of this engine. Researching on line it was subject to recall by Ford due to overheating, which was put down to a nylon pipe failing, which was replaced by a re designed one.

The other main concern (this must also apply to other GDI engines) is carbon build up on the inlet valves. As opposed to more traditional engines, fuel is injected directly into the cylinder, hence the valves aren't cleaned by the fuel. This leads to the seal of the valve being compromised, then lack of performance, rough idling, etc.

Two questions of forum members:

1. Your opinion of the engine & even better if you own one?

2. Any experience of using a GDI inlet valve, turbo cleaner such as CRC, Liqui Moly or Wynns?

Lastly, l'm no engineer so happy to be corrected.

GDI Engines - Ford - badbusdriver

While Ecoboost fans will tell you any problems were fixed early on in the engines history, it doesn't take long to find instances of cars as young as 2017 having their engines fail. And talking to my (mechanic) nephew a couple of weeks ago, he said he was aware of an engine failure in a 2019 car. So while I could be tempted into a new car with the 1.0 Ecoboost and the security of a manufacturers warranty, there is no way I'd even contemplate something 8-10 years old.

When there is such a range of alternatives with proven reliability, why on earth would you risk it?.

Edited by badbusdriver on 12/12/2020 at 13:30

GDI Engines - Ford - madf

The engine needs a new cambelt at 10 years or 100k miles.

The belt runs in oil so major dismantling needed..

The engine needs a specific oil type. NEEDS or it gives all sorts of problems

Batteries are coded and Glass Matt. £200 odd

Personally I'd run a mile.

GDI Engines - Ford - Steveieb
Suggest you experience the joys of three cylinder engines first. I think it was Big John on this site that destroyed the theory once and for all for me saying it goes against Newtons theory of motion.
This was after I had bought my A2 Tdi with a three cylinder Diesel engine.
I simply hate the pulsing and lack of even torque and now enjoy two four cylinder engines . Brilliant but a V 6 is even better.
GDI Engines - Ford - Big John
. Brilliant but a V 6 is even better.

Indeed loved the zodiac v6 back in the day - slight problem re fuel thirst though

GDI Engines - Ford - edlithgow
Suggest you experience the joys of three cylinder engines first. I think it was Big John on this site that destroyed the theory once and for all for me saying it goes against Newtons theory of motion.

Pretty sure that was Einstein, but then he never drove a Skywing, because he couldn't drive.

So what did he know, eh?

www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_yPcWOdjZU

GDI Engines - Ford - Sofa Spud

My experience of 3-cylinder engines from different manufacturers is that they're fine until you get caught out by the dangerous 'zero-acceleration flat spot' when pulling away from walking pace in second gear, for example when filtering onto a busy roundabout.

After over 45 years of driving all sorts of vehicles, developing the habit of routinely changing down to first gear on approaching a roundabout is a new one on me!

GDI Engines - Ford - SLO76

Regarded as very soft by the trade, it’s not one I’d buy even a later example. At the age and money you’re talking about I’d stick with the much more robust conventional 1.6 Yamaha petrol instead. There’s no reason to risk an ecoboost over one of these.

GDI Engines - Ford - S40 Man

My Mrs has a 2014 1.0 ecoboost. Starts on the button, nice to drive, decent power if you give it some beans and decent economy by if you don't.

Never had a single problem with it. Got it in 2016 on 28k miles now it's on 71 k miles Anecdotal but true, they can't all be bad engines and all makes suffer to some extent.

GDI Engines - Ford - elekie&a/c doctor

Totally agree . this is the new age of disposable engines. if anything major fails, it's cheaper to fit a new motor. There are plenty of other troublesome engines out there ,including the Peugeot puretech and the Nissan Dig-t , Mini 3 cylinder engine. these don't seem to get mentioned so often.

GDI Engines - Ford - edlithgow

My Mrs has a 2014 1.0 ecoboost. Starts on the button, nice to drive, decent power if you give it some beans and decent economy by if you don't.

Never had a single problem with it. Got it in 2016 on 28k miles now it's on 71 k miles Anecdotal but true, they can't all be bad engines and all makes suffer to some extent.

A SIX-YEAR OLD CAR THAT ISN"T BROKEN?

And not even Japanese? Astonishing.

If there were many more like that Ford might have to review its bizniz model in the worst way.

GDI Engines - Ford - John F

My Mrs has a 2014 1.0 ecoboost. Starts on the button, nice to drive, decent power if you give it some beans and decent economy by if you don't.

I think the preventive answer is regularly donating plenty of beans. These little engines in small light cars can be more powerful than the engine in my father's Rover 2000TC, a heavy saloon (124bhp) which was considered to be quite fast in its day. With modern high geared transmissions it is quite possible to make good progress without the revs ever exceeding 2000 rpm between gear changes. So the 130hp engine in our Pug 2008 never has to work hard so there is no high speed flow of gases over really hot metal to 'blow the cobwebs away' - or prevent carbon particles settling. Just a thought - I know of no scientific evidence to back it up, but I have always 'red-lined' my engines occasionally when thoroughly warmed up.

GDI Engines - Ford - badbusdriver

My Mrs has a 2014 1.0 ecoboost. Starts on the button, nice to drive, decent power if you give it some beans and decent economy by if you don't.

Never had a single problem with it. Got it in 2016 on 28k miles now it's on 71 k miles Anecdotal but true, they can't all be bad engines and all makes suffer to some extent.

Nobody is saying they are all bad, but if buying a 2nd hand motor of this age, it is all about maximising your chances of getting a reliable car (unless it is cheap enough to write off if there is a big failure, £5k definitely isn't).

Plus, buying a two year old example with up to a year of the manufacturer warranty carries considerably less risk than buying an 8 year old example as the OP is considering.

GDI Engines - Ford - chesterfieldhouse

Thanks all for your opinions & experiences.

Food for thought!

GDI Engines - Ford - Manatee

I'm certainly not an automotive engineer, so treat my comments as pub talk.

Leaving aside the other complexities of these and the other small capacity turbos, GDI's became known for the accumulation of some sort of crud, call it coke, carbon, or a varnish-like deposit in the inlet tract and on the inlet valves. I have always assumed that one source of this is recycled crankcase gases containing various mainly unburnt hydrocarbons and other substances found in oil and fuel. Another would be any oil that makes its way down the valve stems. What effect recycled exhaust gas has I have no thoughts on but it probably adds more unburnt hydrocarbons and some heat, which might even be helpful.

Maybe 'super' fuel helps a bit if it burns more completely, leading to less unwanted stuff in the crankcase vapours and the exhaust. Certainly oil and its additives must matter, as it must be the primary source of almost all of the deposits. So make sure they get exactly the right oil; and if you think there is merit in super petrol then use that, throw some salt over your shoulder and hope it has a little bit of benefit on the deposits problem.

FWIW, I believe Ford at least has started using some port injection along with direct injection on some if not all of these engines. Quite how you find out which ones this applies to, I have no idea. They say it improves efficiency but it should largely solve the problem of deposits too.

We have two direct injection petrol cars, a 1.2 TSI Skoda and a 1.5 MX-5 (non-turbo). They get the right oil (I have started supplying it to make sure) and usually super-petrol. Neither does that many miles so I don't fret too much about the ludicrous extra cost of the magic fuel.

Clean injectors won't remove anything from the inlet tract but can do no harm, and should mean better combustion which might reduce build-up, whether by a detectable amount, who knows? I don't think I could bring myself to shove 'cleaners' down the inlet manifold with the engine running.

Edited by Manatee on 15/12/2020 at 10:34

 

Value my car