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Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - simBea2020

Had the shock of my life when going to view cars for the first time in many years today.
Apparently you don't get a spare wheel anymore, just an 'inflation kit' !!
Now I feel old !!

Ok, so I got over that shock, but then found myself totally bemused by how that played out in the boot compartment.
I was veiwing a 2015 Vauxhaull Astra Estate; at 'AvalailbleCar' of all places - what can I say, it was convenient.

Anyway, on opening the luggage compartment, you get the usual 'false floor' under which the spare wheel is, sorry 'was'. Now this floor was almost an inch thick in itself. Under there, there was almost 2 inches of ... erm .. nothing !!Basically a space an inch or two narrower than the width/length of the false floor itself ans 1-2 innches deep.
And then beyond the nothing, the huge great casm where the spare weel used to be.

Can anyone explain any of this ? I simply cannot understand why so much potential 'space' has been wasted.
I mean, I can almost understand the fact that they have left the well for the spare wheel (almost). But really don't understand why the false floor does not sit directly on top of that, but instead floats an inch or two above. And why the flas floor so thick ?

If you could drop that flase floor, by bike would go in the back almost without having to take the fron wheel off !!




Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - gordonbennet

My answer to these spare wheel-less cars is not to buy them, new or used.

When buyers find their cars are worth nothing in the used market and sales plummet the maker will quickly redesign in the spare wheel.

Astra isn't alone in wasting the space, i've seen many boot floors filled with all sorts of bulky polystyrene type mouldings holding the goo and toy pump supposed to fix the puncture, then there's the adding an optional spare wheel @ £££ wheeze during the new car sale endurance event.

Stop buying such vehicles, give your custom to makers who don't take their customers for fools.

The same could be said for electric parking brakes, don't want one don't buy a car with one fitted, they want your dosh so let them provide what the customer wants.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - RT

Last year my son bought a 2016 Skoda Octavia Estate - we knew it would just come with a puncture kit but we also knew that Skoda dealers sell a spare wheel kit comprising steel wheel, full size tyre, jack kit and hold down screw - we just factored the kit's cost into the total deal.

With the spare fitted, there's still sensible space under tyhe false floor to store things out of prying eyes.

I don't like space saver spares but I had to accept one with my VW Touareg as a full size one won't fit the well - or buy a different car altogether.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Chris M

Absolutely cannot agree with GB regarding used prices plummeting because a car hasn't got a spare wheel. In 40 years I've only ever had one completely flat tyre and that was my first car running on ditchfinders. The last 39 years I've been carrying around an unnecessary accessory.

To the OP. The current Astra K hatchback has a flat floor without the spare. No well to put a wheel in. The estate possibly has the arrangement you describe so that you have a flat floor with the rear seat folded.

Edited by Chris M on 17/11/2018 at 21:11

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Andrew-T

The last 39 years I've been carrying around an unnecessary accessory.

Like you, I can't remember when I last changed a wheel at the roadside, but I would still rather have a spare in the back just in case. If you did suffer a blowout a tube of goo won't be much help. Of course you still have to check every year or so that your wheel bolts haven't seized on ....

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - gkb40

I bought a secondhand Astra Sports Tourer last year.and agree that the lack of spare wheel is a pain but, in this case, can be easily rectified.

Once the laughable inflation kit was consigned to the loft, there's plenty of room to fit a full size spare wheel from the scrappy

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - badbusdriver

This is about 2 things; cutting costs for the manufacturer, and cutting weight from the car.

In the first of those, the manufacturer does away with the spare wheel, jack and brace but sells the car for the same price. If the customer is happy with the car as is, more profit for less car. If the customer wants the spare wheel, jack and brace, they have to pay extra for them. Some will go to a scrap yard or buy 2nd hand Ebay or whatever, but most will pay the dealer, so even more profit. So a win win for the manufacturer/dealer, or from the customers point of view, a lose lose!.

With regards to the weight, with manufacturers being under ever increasing pressure to lower emissions, one way of doing this is to get rid of weight. The spare wheel, jack and brace will not add up to more than a very small percentage of the overall weight, but it may be enough to drop the emissions figure by a gram or two, which in turn may be enough to drop the car in to a lower tax class. So from the manufacturers point of view, worth doing.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Bolt

This is about 2 things; cutting costs for the manufacturer, and cutting weight from the car.

In the first of those, the manufacturer does away with the spare wheel, jack and brace but sells the car for the same price. If the customer is happy with the car as is, more profit for less car. If the customer wants the spare wheel, jack and brace, they have to pay extra for them. Some will go to a scrap yard or buy 2nd hand Ebay or whatever, but most will pay the dealer, so even more profit. So a win win for the manufacturer/dealer, or from the customers point of view, a lose lose!.

With regards to the weight, with manufacturers being under ever increasing pressure to lower emissions, one way of doing this is to get rid of weight. The spare wheel, jack and brace will not add up to more than a very small percentage of the overall weight, but it may be enough to drop the emissions figure by a gram or two, which in turn may be enough to drop the car in to a lower tax class. So from the manufacturers point of view, worth doing.

I expect glass will be the next weight saver as they are talking about using gorilla glass in motors soon, I think one company is already using it in a car though not certain what the car is, so tech is moving on whether we like it or not!

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - RT

This is about 2 things; cutting costs for the manufacturer, and cutting weight from the car.

In the first of those, the manufacturer does away with the spare wheel, jack and brace but sells the car for the same price. If the customer is happy with the car as is, more profit for less car. If the customer wants the spare wheel, jack and brace, they have to pay extra for them. Some will go to a scrap yard or buy 2nd hand Ebay or whatever, but most will pay the dealer, so even more profit. So a win win for the manufacturer/dealer, or from the customers point of view, a lose lose!.

With regards to the weight, with manufacturers being under ever increasing pressure to lower emissions, one way of doing this is to get rid of weight. The spare wheel, jack and brace will not add up to more than a very small percentage of the overall weight, but it may be enough to drop the emissions figure by a gram or two, which in turn may be enough to drop the car in to a lower tax class. So from the manufacturers point of view, worth doing.

I expect glass will be the next weight saver as they are talking about using gorilla glass in motors soon, I think one company is already using it in a car though not certain what the car is, so tech is moving on whether we like it or not!

Car makers have been minimising glass thickness for a long time.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - gordonbennet

Car makers have been minimising glass thickness for a long time.

Not just cars, my lorry was new in late feb or march, on its third windscreen, another of the same batch is on its fourth or possibly fifth, both vehicles around 130k kms mileage.

Trouble is they have to be fitted at the dealership premises (even if a contractor fits an aftermarket screen) because the lane departure and/or AEBS have to be recalibrated each time.

Edited by gordonbennet on 17/11/2018 at 22:28

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Andrew-T

With regards to the weight, with manufacturers being under ever increasing pressure to lower emissions, one way of doing this is to get rid of weight.

Hmmm. The weight of cars has been increasing steadily for decades, and not simply because they have been getting bigger. Much of the increase is for crash protection, but 'lowering emissions' is an afterthought. Every revised model has more gizmos which become less essential with every change, but mostly add to the weight of the car.

Even the heaviest Peugeot 205 (the convertible) was well under a ton, thanks to a cleverly designed light bodyshell, but you'll be hard pushed to find any car as light as that these days.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Avant

"The last 39 years I've been carrying around an unnecessary accessory."

Glad to hear it, Chris M. Punctures are less frequent than they used to be, unless you have low-profile tyres it seems. The only punctures I've had in recent years (touching wood) were with each of the three Skodas I had which had 225x40x18 tyres.

I hope it never happens to you, Chris, but do tell us what you would do if the following happened:

- You have no spare wheel

- A pothole causes a big gash in a tyre, too big to be repaired by the can of goo

- You are on a country lane where (and this is still quite common) there is no mobile reception and you can't call for assistance

- And it's raining.

Edited by Avant on 17/11/2018 at 23:39

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Chris M

You left out that it's dark and 10pm on a Sunday Avant.

I've considered this scenario. I'd put on the waterproof I keep in the boot and walk. When I got a signal I'd either find a 24hr mobile tyre fitting company, join the AA /RAC or call a cab to take me home. All three options will cost but spread that over 39 years and I can cope with it.

As I'm now retired, time isn't that critical to me and generally I don't travel that far from home. If I were using the car for work (not just commuting), did a high mileage and didn't have other cars in the household, I might come to a different decision.

I really like my Astra but the boot would be too small for the dog crate with a spare wheel fitted. Not having one is no deal breaker for me.

P.S. I've never paid for breakdown cover. That would have been a waste of money too.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Andrew-T

I've never paid for breakdown cover. That would have been a waste of money too.

I have paid for breakdown cover, and have used it at least twice - but not for anything to do with tyres, but engine problems. Maybe summed over several decades it could be argued that it was a waste of money, but on each occasion it definitely wasn't.

Extended warranties are the classic 'waste of money'.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - RT

All warranties and insurance are a complete waste of money - until you need them!

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Kekettykek

I've broken down twice in the 25 years I've been driving. On both occasions I called a local recovery company and paid them to take me home. Total cost around has been £150. If I had breakdown cover all those years I would have paid thousands in premiums.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - John F

"The last 39 years I've been carrying around an unnecessary accessory."

The same might be said of at least one of the rear seats in our cars. The three rear weighty headrests of the Focus spend most of their time in the garage.

In the 14 years and 100,000m of our Focus, I can remember being grateful for the space-saver at least twice. And I have already used the Audi spare once in the 4 years of ownership. Like gb, I would always carry a spare.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - FiestaOwner

Agree with John F.

Alway have a spare too. Have had a few punctures over the years. Had 2 in the space of a month with my works van earlier this year.

My last puncture with my car, I was 200 miles away from home. Was able to fit the full sized spare and continue my journey.

Punctures always happen at the most inconvenient times. I can change a wheel within 1/4 hour.

If you feel you don't need a spare, then read the following article:

www.qashqaiforums.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=28&t=4...3

Still think that you don't need a spare?

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - gordonbennet

As for being stranded, try a blow out at around 5pm on the M11 near Cambridge at this time of year so dark already.

This was in a new design car transporter with unusual trailer tyre sizes, where the breakdown fitter spent most of the evening running all over East Anglia trying to find the correct tyre at one of their depots, eventually got going again at 10pm.

Not a problem for me, i've got a loaded lorry weighing some 40 tons and a full sized cab with food and drink available so i'm quite safe and warm to sit and snooze it out, but put yourself in this position with your car with passengers, possibly young children, in the dark in poor possibly freezing weather on a 2 lane motorway with one of the narrowest hard shoulders.

The above Qashqai link shows how important it is to know you have everything you need and to make sure the wheelnuts are able to be undone by you with the toolkit, plus torch gloves coat and a hivis in the car, the side of a fast moving road is a dangerous place to be, but there are worse places still you could be.

On a slight tangent, but some people who suffer breakdowns really do not help themselves, if you suffer a breakdown of any sort try to use the remaining momentum of the vehicle to put yourself out of harms way, ie if the engine dies try to run the car at least partly off the road if you can't get it fully off, if you get an offside puncture try to run the nearside wheels off onto the grass so giving you another yard or two of space between you (or whoever is going to change the wheel) and the passing traffic.

Thing is if you try your best to help yourself, you tend to find that the remaining few good samaritans out there are more likely to come to your aid if they see you have done your best, if you simply stop at the most awkward spot you could imagine and make no attempt to mitigate your circs then the few will be less sympathetic and more likely to pass you by...ie those who break down in the most awkward spot and make no attempt to ease the situation when possible, thereby making it more difficult for the breakdown to help who are also stuck in the traffic jam they have caused.

Edited by gordonbennet on 18/11/2018 at 09:53

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Andrew-T

... if you suffer a breakdown of any sort try to use the remaining momentum of the vehicle to put yourself out of harms way, ie if the engine dies try to run the car at least partly off the road if you can't get it fully off, if you get an offside puncture try to run the nearside wheels off onto the grass so giving you another yard or two of space between you (or whoever is going to change the wheel) and the passing traffic.

About 20 years ago I was trundling northwards into Hereford on the A465 when the clutch cable failed on the 205 Dturbo. Luckily it was possible to get onto a wide verge before calling the RAC, who was on the other side of town. He arrived after about an hour and managed to crimp the lower end of the cable and we continued our journey home. The crimp lasted until the car was sold some time later, which I was very glad of, as there's very little space to fit another cable behind that engine ....

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Engineer Andy

Agree with John F.

Alway have a spare too. Have had a few punctures over the years. Had 2 in the space of a month with my works van earlier this year.

My last puncture with my car, I was 200 miles away from home. Was able to fit the full sized spare and continue my journey.

Punctures always happen at the most inconvenient times. I can change a wheel within 1/4 hour.

If you feel you don't need a spare, then read the following article:

www.qashqaiforums.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=28&t=4...3

Still think that you don't need a spare?

One of the (many) reasons I decided NOT to change my (then) 11yo Mazda3 for a new car back in 2017. My car's standard tyres (17in, 16in and 15in allowable and widely available) were widely available and often between 40-60% of the price of the similar, but unusual size combos, and could be sourced the same day should I want to pay a bit more than via mail order.

Not so long ago (but still 2 years in on the latest gen Mazda3 being available) some Mazda3 Sport owners were finding it was taking tyre fitters SEVERAL WEEKS to source the non-standard 18in tyres - God knows what would've happened if they needed a replacement pronto like the above situation.

When I looked on BlackCircles, some of their models had about 20% of the number of tyres available than more standard ones like mine, and this included quite a few winter tyres and very high performance, very expensive summer tyres and run-out models that were (comparitively) noisy and poor on fuel economy.

If any car doesn't at least come with a spare of some kind or with the facility to accept one below the main boot space (and at a reasonable price), then I just won't even entertain buying that car, even if it's brilliant in all other respects. I agree - it's a red line - no spare, no sale.

Hopefully manufacturers will get the drift once people wake up to this stupidity and vote with their wallets to go with cars that have spares, preferably full sized ones, or at least the space to take the flat once the space (weight) saver is fitted. Save weight in other ways - e.g. less unwanted gizmos.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Chris M

The Qashqai owner - WHAT A MUPPET. A fully paid up member of today's ever expanding "victim" club.

When he was perusing the spec. list of his Acenta Premium he probably checked it had the 18" bling wheels, 1000w sound system and chrome trim around the gear stick, but failed to look further down to check that it had a spare. He didn't try to familiarize himself with how the jack worked or where to place it under the car (I know where my can of gunk is and what to do with it if required). And he obviously didn't bother to check the pressure in his non-existent spare in the year he had the car. He then blames Nissan. I guess he feels the "bells and whistles" should include backside wiping as well. Why would you go to a main dealer rather than straight to Kwik Fit or similar. The four hour wait was likely due to all the other muppets who can't change a wheel for themselves, can't be bothered to do basic maintenance checks or wait till the car stops even though the warning light has been on for weeks. One reason I won't subsidise these fools. Rant over.

I am wondering though whether those of you who won't leave home without the comfort of a spare wheel also carry a tool kit, overalls, bit of old carpet, piece of wood to jack on soft ground, jump leads, tow rope, top and bottom radiator hoses, clutch cable, engine oil, antifreeze, washer fluid, water and of course, a tin of Damp Start which you last used when you ran a Marina. Most of these would commonly be found in the boot 30 years ago, but time has moved on.

Edited by Chris M on 18/11/2018 at 16:00

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - skidpan

Earlier this year when we were swapping the wifes car we looked at the new Astra. We liked it in just about every respect until we looked in the boot. It was not large but when we lifted the carpet to look if a full size wheel would fit we were stunned to find that there was not even room for a space saver. Dealer tried to be helpful, ordered in a raised boot floor kit that is required if you want a space saver but with that in the boot was simply way too small.

So we did what other above have suggest, we walked.

Bought a Skoda Fabia. Room under the carpet for a space saver or full size spare (that is what we have) and the boot is still a sensible size.

Plenty of cars out there that will carry a spare with no loss of boot space so why buy one that has no spare.

Another warning, Skoda charge a very reasonable £100 for a spare (space saver or proper wheel/tyre including tool kit etc) instead of the bottle of glue. But some manufacturers charge stupid money. Mazda are one, they wanted £450 and I am sure it robs boot space when fitted.

Once I asked a salesman where would I put a full size wheel off the car if I had to fit the space saver should the boot be full of luggage and the wheel well be too small. His answer was get a passenger to have it on their lap. We walked off laughing.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Engineer Andy

I agree that for an increasing number of well-informed punters, cars having a full-sized spare or the space to accommodate one is going to be a big plus point. Probably one of the reasons why the likes of Skoda get higher review scores than competitors.

As regards the pricing of the different types af spare tyre/wheel systems available via the manufacturers, it would be interesting to see if the likes of VW, Audi and SEAT offer their equivalent cars with exactly the same specs in terms of space provided for the full sized spare, as well as whether they offer a space-saver or full sized one as standard, an option and the price of them - is this a VAG wide policy or down to each one and there's a wide variance in what's offered.

Looking at John Cadogan's video reviews of cars Down Under, the latest Hyundai i30 has a full sized spare fitted, possibly as standard, although in the UK they only get a space saver (their website doesn't say whether the space is there to stow a full sized one).

You have to wonder how manufacturers can get away with offering lower spec cars in this regard and either not lowering prices or, as Mazda does, charging exhorbitant rates for what others offer for less than a third of the price, as well as significantly reducing available boot space to accommodate them. Like Skidpan, when I was looking for a new car last year, told my local Mazda dealer (whom I've used for maintenance for all my car's life) what I thought of this policy (even if politely). He didn't seem too perturbed about it, at least on the surface, perhaps because he knew that so many punters wouldn't be concerned or know about it, until it was too late, like the QQ owner.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - focussed

I am wondering though whether those of you who won't leave home without the comfort of a spare wheel also carry a tool kit, overalls, bit of old carpet, piece of wood to jack on soft ground, jump leads, tow rope, top and bottom radiator hoses, clutch cable, engine oil, antifreeze, washer fluid, water and of course, a tin of Damp Start which you last used when you ran a Marina. Most of these would commonly be found in the boot 30 years ago, but time has moved on.

Add spare plugs, points and distributor cap to that list and it sounds just like my dear old Dad!

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Avant

"Once I asked a salesman where would I put a full size wheel off the car if I had to fit the space saver should the boot be full of luggage and the wheel well be too small. His answer was get a passenger to have it on their lap."

Good question - but his answer could have been dangerous. A woman passenger in a BMW Z3 was killed in exactly that situation - no room in the boot for the orignal tyre, which rather than being punctured had a buldge in the sidewall. This bulge exploded with tragic consequences.

So either put it on the back seat if the boot is full - not possible of course in a Z3 - or it goes in the boot and the passenger has luggage on their lap.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Smileyman

One of the reasons I selected against the Mazda 3 last year was the lack of spare ... and with a smallish boot insufficient space for even and emergency space saver.

Punctures do occur. I had one last year, was able to put the spare on and continue with my journey in next to no time, albeit restricted to 50 mph.

Mrs S had a tyre burst about two years ago, midweek 8pm wold dark wet night. A couple of local workmen very kindly helped her with swapping the burst tyre with the spare, home in next to no time then I purchased a tyre online for the local fast fit garage to fit 48 hours later (and at a much better price than walk in price, and my choice of tyre, not just what ever was on the shelf.

Also, last Sunday Mrs S suffered a puncture - this time a slow puncture and was able to drive to the same fast fit garage, later same evening I purchased the new tyre and it was fitted midweek.

I do think it is important to shop locally, support and keep in business the fast fit tyre places as they do serve a useful purpose ... however I am not their shareholder's benefactor and if they want to compete with the internet retailer prices they are being sensible by selling tyres online for delivery to and fitting at their own branch network of garages

PS Mrs S drives ... a 2004 Mazda 2. Won't be buying the latest model ... no spare tyre and no space for one either. Hope the message will be received by Mazda.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Engineer Andy

One of the reasons I selected against the Mazda 3 last year was the lack of spare ... and with a smallish boot insufficient space for even and emergency space saver.

Punctures do occur. I had one last year, was able to put the spare on and continue with my journey in next to no time, albeit restricted to 50 mph.

Mrs S had a tyre burst about two years ago, midweek 8pm wold dark wet night. A couple of local workmen very kindly helped her with swapping the burst tyre with the spare, home in next to no time then I purchased a tyre online for the local fast fit garage to fit 48 hours later (and at a much better price than walk in price, and my choice of tyre, not just what ever was on the shelf.

Also, last Sunday Mrs S suffered a puncture - this time a slow puncture and was able to drive to the same fast fit garage, later same evening I purchased the new tyre and it was fitted midweek.

I do think it is important to shop locally, support and keep in business the fast fit tyre places as they do serve a useful purpose ... however I am not their shareholder's benefactor and if they want to compete with the internet retailer prices they are being sensible by selling tyres online for delivery to and fitting at their own branch network of garages

PS Mrs S drives ... a 2004 Mazda 2. Won't be buying the latest model ... no spare tyre and no space for one either. Hope the message will be received by Mazda.

I was told by Mazda that all their standard cars (not some Sports models, not sure about the MX-5) had the space for a space saver, but they weren't fitted as standard. Skidpan, if I recall (from another thread a while ago) said that on the latest 3 at least (probably a reasonably assumption for the others) the fitting of a space saver lifted the boot floor up a bit (can't remember how much though).

I too hope that Mazda gets the message. A slight aside is that I've heard reports that Mazda have also decided to replace their multi-link rear suspension set up for the gen-4 Mazda3 due to next year or 2020 with a twist-beam - the report alluded that this was to save on costs and make the ride 'more comfortable' - I wonder if that is at the expense of handling, the one thing Mazdas are renowned for. Maybe they are listening to the wrong people?

The daft thing with the use of space savers vs full size or none is that the car's emissions ratings are based on what is sold as new, so they could easily offer all cars with an underboot space big enough for a full sized spare with just the (light) repair kit in its place as standard fit, and offer the spares (of both types) as a reasonable costed optional extra to be fitted after purchase - given that's what they get away with now with the space (weight) savers. Problem solved.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Snakey

On my last two cars (astra and civic) I've bought a space saver second hand and put it in the boot. I had two punctures last year - one was very slow and down to a nail, but the other was a big chunk of metal that tore a chunk out of the tyre.

I was lucky enough to be close to home so got the car on the drive - without the space saver the car would have been useless, unless I faffed about with a rescue service. In the end I popped the space saver on and got the new tyre put on the next day. For the £80 the spare wheel cost it makes things so much easier and I wouldn't drive without one now.

Maybe its regional but a lot of people complain about punctures around my way - the council don't fix anything so a lot of them are pothole related.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - skidpan

it would be interesting to see if the likes of VW, Audi and SEAT offer their equivalent cars with exactly the same specs in terms of space provided for the full sized spare, as well as whether they offer a space-saver or full sized one as standard, an option and the price of them - is this a VAG wide policy or down to each one and there's a wide variance in what's offered.

Can only comment about the Seat Leon we had and in that although the car had quite a deep wheel well it was not deep enough to take a "full" size spare without loosing a bit of space, it was about 2" using a 195 65 15 combination instead of the 205 55 16 combination. As for price when we bought the car there was no spare option of any type but eventually they let me know you could buy a space saver wheel for about £90. Bargain I thought until they said they wanted another £220 for a space saver tyre and another £40 for a jack kit, total approx £350. So instead I bought the 15" tyre/wheel from MyTyres for about £70 and bought a jack from e-bay for a tenner and put a suitable socket wrench in the tool roll. Eventually they did introduce a full kit for about £200, better but still not cheap considering its only a space saver.

As far as Audi and VW, like Seat their cars are typically a bit smaller than the Skoda equivalent which probably accounts for Skoda possibly being the only company to offer the space saver or temporary spare (real steel wheel and tyre but a bit narrower) for a very reasonable £100. But not all variants get an option for the temporary spare, the posh Superbs only get the option of the space saver because of the brake disc clearance.

Skidpan, if I recall (from another thread a while ago) said that on the latest 3 at least (probably a reasonably assumption for the others) the fitting of a space saver lifted the boot floor up a bit (can't remember how much though).

We have looked at the 3, 6 and CX5 and I am pretty certain that fitting a space saver in any of them reduces boot space. Probably not a great issue in the 6 but in the 3 (which is not generous with boot space at all) and in the CX5 (not as good as the 6 despite its greater size) it would be.

But as I said in a previous post if there is not space for a full size spare where do you put a full sized punctured tyre if the car is already packed full on a holiday trip.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Chris M

"where do you put a full sized punctured tyre if the car is already packed full on a holiday trip"

I don't have that problem :-)

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - sammy1

Runflats or rely on the breakdown services, some even carry spare wheels or call out mobile tyre fitters, there are stacks around

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - skidpan

Runflats or rely on the breakdown services, some even carry spare wheels or call out mobile tyre fitters, there are stacks around

You may be happy with that solution but its something I would never consider as acceptable.

Just for the sake of an example you are in the north of Scotland late on a Saturday afternoon, it happens to us twice a year. How long would it take the RAC to get to us and how many mobile tyre fitters are there in an area where sheep outnumber people by a huge margin. A few years ago it took 3 days for a windscreen repair man to get to us, there were only 2 covering the area north of a line between Glasgow and Edinburgh.

And even if one of these plentiful breakdown people did turn up before we starved and fitted a spare wheel with a car full of luggage and people where are we going to put the punctured wheel/tyre. Would we expect them to follow us to our destination with it in their van? More likely we would have to spend time collecting it from some depot miles from our destination.

As for run flats there is a limit to the distance you can travel with a punctured tyre on the car plus your speed should be reduced. Unless the car is fitted with TPMS its illegal to fit them since a punctured tyre normally does not visually show any loss of pressure. And then there is the ride. We have had them on 2 cars in sensible 55 and 50 profile versions. Both cars rode OK but once I was loaned a car on 18" 40 profile run flats and it was truly dreadful. The BMW 1 series was on 50 profile run flats and as I said it was fine but when (with the agreement of Aviva) we fitted non run flat winter tyres (XL rated) the difference in ride was instantly noticeable.

Sorry but its a full size spare for us everytime. It might limit our car choice but we have not yet found selecting a suitable car that difficult.

And the cars with run flats and no spares, it was never intended to use them for the Scottish holiday run, far too small.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - sammy1

Agree if you live out in the wilds than you must take all necessary steps to look after your best interests. Cannot accept any real criticism on runflats, I have had them on three cars for last 15years and they perform well. Even if you have a spare then the effort of changing it, jacking getting the nuts off, lifting the wheel, is beyond the capabilities of a lot of motorists. Also the location of a tyre failure can be very dangerous.

Vaux Astra - The space where the spare wheel used to be - Bromptonaut

Both our cars have full size spares albeit steel on models with alloys.

Standard fit in the Berlingo and stowed under car in a cage.

Roomster was offered as dealer approved used with a goo kit but negotiated full size spare and jack as part of deal. This one is under boot floor so it's everything out onto hard shoulder to access spare etc

Had to use both in last 12 months. Berlingo's went down very quickly on a day trip from Kent to France. Pumped up at roadside but could hear air hissing out. Stopped in square at next village and got spare on with no difficulty other than understanding that bolts have a double taper and therefore stand proud of steel rim when fitted. No idea if goo would have done job.

Been aware for a month or so that Roomster's o/s rear was losing pressure slightly. Both rears are getting both worn and old and are slated for replacement. But as my Grandfather reputedly said 'the road to hell is paved with good intentions' and as of this weekend I'd yet to get around to it. Stopped Trowell on M1 on Sunday en-route home from a glorious weekend in Scarborough to discover it was now going down in hours not weeks.

Needed reflating before and after work yesterday so sorted myself out to put spare on. All reasonably straightforward, bolts came out OK with recently purchased extension bar. but I could not separate wheel from hub. Block and hammer had no effect and eventually surrendered and called out Britannia Rescue. Waited 90+ minutes for a very pleasnt young man from their contractor Cowans who hit wheel a few times with a wooden mallet and off it came. Now in well under boot floor while I find best price for 195/55 R15.

Goo would probably have fettled that one.

 

Value my car