any - Damage - to claim or not - frankly

My son's new car (2015) that he has had only a week, has been hit by a flying pub sign which was blown from it's 2? fixings. You know the type, black chalkboard sign with the menu or whatever painted on. Slight ding in the door, right on the coachline' in the metal which will require slight filling I suspect, plus a couple of scuffs to the door paint work.

What are his options please? eg. he does not seem to want to report to his insurers, but it's still under warranty with Landrover, this is an expensive Range Rover BTW. Does he report to his insurer and hopefully after getting details - pass them on to them to sort.

As yet the Landlady hasn't given any or much info. said she would have to ask the Landlord first but he's not around. I would have thought to get their property insurance details? is this what premises have to have displayed by law in the public bar area?

Any help Appreciated.

any - Damage - to claim or not - RobJP

They'll have their public liability insurance details on public display, not property insurance details.

If he doesn't want to report to his insurance, then his only option is to get the other party to pay up directly - if he approaches their insurance company, then he risks them informing his insurance company that they've paid out on a claim on a car. And then he faces awkward questions as to why he hasn't informed his insurance company, as required to by his policy.

I'd leave him to it. His car, his call. Whatever you recommend, it may end up costing him money, or grief.

any - Damage - to claim or not - frankly

Thanks RobJP.

I agree and deep down knew I should leave him to it. Oh and yes the public liability insurance, I need to read up on that one, perhaps that only covers the public inside the premises.

any - Damage - to claim or not - argybargy

I'd give the pub landlord/ lady a timescale for responding with an offer of payment to repair the damage, and if no such offer is received within that time, go to his insurance company and let them sort it out.

In any case he should inform his insurance as it counts as disclosable. Shouldn't have any detrimental effect on his premium.

any - Damage - to claim or not - John F

Yes, leave it to him. You might consider rephrasing your question - 'to repair or not?'

Is the car an ornamental work of art or a utility conveyance, like a shoe or wheelbarrow? We have been conned into spending thousands on minor dings by an industry persuading us that anything less than bodily perfection is unacceptable. Our insurance premiums, especially those for youngsters and those who have made claims, reflect this.

Our cars have a collection of small dents and scuffs, not worth the hassle of repairing. Arguably, the marks of usage and age add character, as on a piece of old furniture.

any - Damage - to claim or not - argybargy

Yes, leave it to him. You might consider rephrasing your question - 'to repair or not?'

Is the car an ornamental work of art or a utility conveyance, like a shoe or wheelbarrow? We have been conned into spending thousands on minor dings by an industry persuading us that anything less than bodily perfection is unacceptable. Our insurance premiums, especially those for youngsters and those who have made claims, reflect this.

Our cars have a collection of small dents and scuffs, not worth the hassle of repairing. Arguably, the marks of usage and age add character, as on a piece of old furniture.

Which is why till we bought our latest car, I always tended to go for cars with a bit of prior damage ( and also because I was rubbish at spotting it). A few more scratches on top of existing scuffs didn't matter, though I was pretty mad when, after parking my half decent Focus in a tiny space outside a local steak house, we came out to find a deep dent in the door where the passenger of the car next to us had clearly banged open their door hard against our car, presumably in pique at being forced to squeeze in.

We now have a car which is in decent nick, and I live in constant fear of trolley rash or car park nudges.

Memories of the devil may car days of driving around in a battered shed haven't entirely disappeared from my mind.

any - Damage - to claim or not - frankly

Yes, leave it to him. You might consider rephrasing your question - 'to repair or not?'

Is the car an ornamental work of art or a utility conveyance, like a shoe or wheelbarrow? We have been conned into spending thousands on minor dings by an industry persuading us that anything less than bodily perfection is unacceptable. Our insurance premiums, especially those for youngsters and those who have made claims, reflect this.

Our cars have a collection of small dents and scuffs, not worth the hassle of repairing. Arguably, the marks of usage and age add character, as on a piece of old furniture.

I'm not biting honestly.... but any new/new'ish or mint condition car that collects it's first 'character' ding, hurts! especially within a week or a few weeks. To be honest when I first saw his car in pristine condition - maybe not a work of art but I was impressed. Probably is to him though.

How would you like your TR7 dinging? or is it already full of character? ;-)

There is some good news, offer has been made to pay up for repair, hopefully it will have a happy conclusion. Trouble'd with wind_Frankly.

 

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