Controlling an automatic slow speed - Dwight Van Driver

To Garage my car, manual gearbox, I electrically fully retract my wing mirrors, swing to the right entering my drive and square up to my garage door frame and stop short. Then using slipping clutch, bit of accelerator, maybe touch of foot brake I creep foward into the narrow garage opening up to and close to the wall ahead, brake to a stop, switch off , leave in gear ,release brake.

Contemplating as to how I could control an inch forward with an automatic cvt can someone advise me in detail how I could this and how to inch the vehicle forward undercontrol and without colliding with garage door frame/wall?.

Thanks in anticipation.

dvd

Controlling an automatic slow speed - craig-pd130

I've just switched from owning nothing but manuals to an auto, and it's easy.

All autos will 'creep' at around 4 - 5mph when in drive without any throttle input, so just leave the gear selector in drive, cover the brake with a foot (left or right, it's up to you, I'm not going to get into that debate!) and simply use the brake lightly to control the forwards creep. No need to touch the throttle at all.

When you get close enough to the rear wall of the garage, brake to a stop, select 'Park' (which locks the transmission so the car cannot move), switch engine off.

Controlling an automatic slow speed - argybargy

Put your auto into Drive, take your foot off the brake but continue to "cover" the pedal and apply occasional pressure on the brakes to keep your speed to a minimum, and the car will move forward slowly on its own.

Just before you hit the wall, stop the car with the brake, keep your foot on the brake pedal and put your gear selector into Park.

No need to think about it too hard.

Edit: apologies for repeating your post more or less word for word, Craig. Didn't see your post till I'd already composed and posted mine.

Edited by argybargy on 13/10/2017 at 10:40

Controlling an automatic slow speed - RT

As above, engage drive and use the brakes to control the speed - if there's any gradient on the drive you may need to vary the amount of braking to get the desired speed.

Arrange a test drive of an automatic car and have a test run.

Not a cheap option but a surround camera (Area View for VW Group) is better than "just" a reversing camera as you can see the sides - also get a car with front parking sensors, it's to easy to hit things with that as the front swings round - got the T-shirt from the last car!

Controlling an automatic slow speed - Engineer Andy

I agree - creeping forward with no pedal input is an odd sensation - I tried this when I test drove a Mazda CX-3 auto earlier in the year - it was the first time I'd driven an automatic car, and even tried in my company car park (it was a Saturday, so it was safe [empty]) to have a go at left foot braking, which would take some getting used to, especially as you get older and have never driven an auto before.

Controlling an automatic slow speed - craig-pd130

I agree - creeping forward with no pedal input is an odd sensation - I tried this when I test drove a Mazda CX-3 auto earlier in the year - it was the first time I'd driven an automatic car, and even tried in my company car park (it was a Saturday, so it was safe [empty]) to have a go at left foot braking, which would take some getting used to, especially as you get older and have never driven an auto before.

You do get familiar with the 'creep' and how to control it very quickly, though. And the ability to manoeuver in tight spots just using the brake pedal, without having to juggle the clutch as well, soon becomes second nature.

Controlling an automatic slow speed - Engineer Andy

I agree - creeping forward with no pedal input is an odd sensation - I tried this when I test drove a Mazda CX-3 auto earlier in the year - it was the first time I'd driven an automatic car, and even tried in my company car park (it was a Saturday, so it was safe [empty]) to have a go at left foot braking, which would take some getting used to, especially as you get older and have never driven an auto before.

You do get familiar with the 'creep' and how to control it very quickly, though. And the ability to manoeuver in tight spots just using the brake pedal, without having to juggle the clutch as well, soon becomes second nature.

I hope so, though I would (if I do buy an auto car next time [I didn't buy anything back in Feb]) find it easier being 'only' 43 and not well into my 70s (there's no way my parents would consider switching - the phrase "you can't teach an old dog new tricks" comes to mind). I must admit my left foot kept on going for a phantom clutch pedal on more than one occasion when drawing up to a junction/stop!

Controlling an automatic slow speed - joegrundy

The 'auto creep' is a very useful function.

In icy/black ice conditions it enables a slow take-off until gentle throttle can be applied.

Some years ago I was in the US on a job, driving a rental car and encountered a highway hold-up, one lane closed, merge slowly (sort of thing all too common here now). The bottlekneck cleared quite quickly mainly, I think, because cars were 'creeping', rather than the 'stop/handbrake/neutral/start again' we have with manual cars. (Nowadays this can be even worse with 'stop/start' - it's bad enough in everyday use at roundabouts and lights, but that's another discussion.)

Controlling an automatic slow speed - badbusdriver

My ford transit connect will do the 'auto creep', despite having a manual gearbox and (at the start of the day) 500kg of water in the back. 1st gear, gently release clutch, and away it will go!. Handy in very slow moving traffic to prevent an ache on the left leg from all the action(!).

My wife and i also have a new honda jazz cvt and while i can't recall having been in the situation of trying the auto creep, i can confirm that if you are gentle with the throttle, the acceleration will be equally gentle.

Controlling an automatic slow speed - madf

With a Jazz CVT I find slow speed reversing into tight spaces easy - especially with rear sensors and big side mirrors.. Creep is great for slow moving traffic jams..

I went auto due to old age , and increaing traffic holdups.

Controlling an automatic slow speed - John F

If garage only just long enough, screw a 2" thick block of wood into the floor for the front wheel to hit just before you hit the wall. Works for me.

Controlling an automatic slow speed - RT

If garage only just long enough, screw a 2" thick block of wood into the floor for the front wheel to hit just before you hit the wall. Works for me.

And some foam cushions on the wall as a plan B

Controlling an automatic slow speed - craig-pd130

If garage only just long enough, screw a 2" thick block of wood into the floor for the front wheel to hit just before you hit the wall. Works for me.

And some foam cushions on the wall as a plan B

A couple of old tyres are good for that sort of thing too

Controlling an automatic slow speed - Sofa Spud

Not really such an odd sensation since we're all used to manual cars rolling forwards or backwards on anything but a level surface!

Controlling an automatic slow speed - SLO76
I'd imagine all modern autos will creep to allow easy low speed manoeuvring but in the 90's the early CVT's, particularly Ford and Fiat didn't move without your foot on the accelerator and then they'd shoot forward (or backward) alarmingly quickly. It made them very difficult to park, especially for the type of customer who typically wanted a small auto. I remember, unsuccessfully trying to talk a Punter out of buying a Fiesta 1.1 CVT and instead to opt for a Colt but it fell of deaf ears even after a demonstration. Spotted it not long after with the rear bumper dented and scuffed.
Controlling an automatic slow speed - badbusdriver

I'm sure I have read that automated manuals don't do the auto creep?.

Controlling an automatic slow speed - Avant

"I'm sure I have read that automated manuals don't do the auto creep?"

One of my Octavias had DSG, and that 'crept' fine. I wouldn't want an automatic that didn't.

Controlling an automatic slow speed - argybargy

I'm sure I have read that automated manuals don't do the auto creep?.

Avant has already answered this, but I can confirm that my B Max with Powershift does the "auto creep", and does it beautifully. ;0)

A few days after we bought the Meriva with Easytronic, back in 2008, I let my wife take it out. First time she'd ever driven an automatic.

First set of red lights we got to she hit the brake, thinking it was the clutch, and nearly put us both through the windscreen. Part of the reason for buying this automatic manual car was so she could get back on the road again, having not driven since that moment.

I'm working up to it, honest.

Controlling an automatic slow speed - colinh

Have Auris hybrid - find reversing in is easiest (narrow street, narrow gateposts and well as garage doors, plus it's up a ramp) - given slow speed, and being end of a journey, normally there is sufficient electric power to do it in EV mode. Rear camera gives guideline of how far to reverse without hitting washing machine! Fold mirrors after gateposts and before garage doors. If I slow too much on the ramp, engine will kick-in

Controlling an automatic slow speed - Dwight Van Driver

Gentlemen

My thanks to you all. Fears abated

DVD

Controlling an automatic slow speed - Dwight Van Driver

Just back from a first half hour run solo driving an automatic and into narrow garage and parked up.

Bladdy brilliant,,,,,,,,

Should have had an auto years ago

Estatic dvd.

Controlling an automatic slow speed - oldroverboy.

And good to see you are recovering and driving again!

Stay safe,

ORB

 

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