Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - sgreenwood

Hi all,

I would appreciate some friendly advice and recommendations.

I'm looking at buy a cheap run around for my wife who drives c. 5k p/a.

We've narrowed the choice to a Skoda Citigo or a Peugeot 107:

Skoda:

www.seniorcars.co.uk/used/skoda/citigo/10-mpi-se-5...6

Peugeot:

www.ebay.co.uk/itm/182628950063

Having test driven both the Citigo is the more refined (I prefer it) but the Peugeot is more 'fun' (my wife's choice).

Both can be had for the same money after haggling.

However, I can't get to the bottom of whether the Skoda will need its timing belt changed shortly. Local Skoda dealer says it needs replacing at 160k or 5 years, the salesman says the book makes no mention of it and the interweb is equally confused. I called VW who said the Up!'s belt only needs inspecting at 160k with no replacement necessary.

Can anyone advise? Replacing it at c. £300 could swing things in favour of the chain-driven Peugeot (and my wife wins :0) ).

For background I have a company car which is hammered at weekend so this choice really is for a run around - although we have two kids and a dog to transport too on occasions (v. small distances).

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - badbusdriver

Given the car is for your wife, surely it should be her choice?.

But bear in mind, the peugeot 107, citroen c1 and toyota aygo are the same car under the skin. Same goes for the skoda, which is the same as the seat mii and vw up.

I was going to suggest the hyundai i10 which is more refined than the skoda (and almost certainly more reliable than either of your choices), but it isnt much fun to drive.

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - sgreenwood
My wife doesn't mind and has put the decision to me (so no screwing up :0)).

We looked at the i10 and the shared Suzuki / Vauxhall offerings but my wife didn't like either.
Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - badbusdriver

She is only saying that so if anything goes wrong, it will be your fault!.

Regarding the belt, it is 5 years OR whatever the miles were (whichever comes first), so yes, you will have to get the belt done next year.

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - badbusdriver

Sorry, just re read post re timing belt, then did some digging. Yes, there does seem to be some confusion there. Personally, i would err on the side of caution and get it changed.

Also, regarding the peugeot with its chain, one thing i have learned on this forum, is that they are not the be all and end all some people think, and it is absolutely essential that the service schedules are followed rigorously, particularly oil changes, so if going for the peugeot, ensure there is proof of this.

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - sgreenwood
We'll likely keep the car until it dies so factoring in two or more belt changes adds up - especially on a car which we aim to run on c.£1k p/a!

It's a shame as the Citigo is clearly a good proposition but the extra maintenance cost Is putting me off. I'm sure others may feel the same.
Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - Big John

It's a special long life cam belt that's designed to last the life of the engine

The Skoda Citigo has a great little direct injection EA211 that is proving to be reliable and ,economical. In my opinion it's a much better long term car than the 107 (which has clutch problems and water pumps are made from putty) - Saying that the very last version of the 107 were the best version, there were some fantastic end of model sales at the time (circa 2014)

Edited by Big John on 07/08/2017 at 22:56

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - John Boy

Off-topic, I'm afraid, but whoever photographed the Skoda did a superb job!

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - SLO76
As far as I'm aware the belt is due along with the water pump at 5yrs or 140k whichever comes soonest. Cost will be around £350-£400 at a main dealer but you'll get manufacturer parts and I assume as with VW the same 5yr warranty on the job.

I like the Citigo/Mii/UP! It's a good little car. Well made and a bit more refined plus it rides a bit more maturely than other city cars but it does tend to wander a bit at higher speeds and in crosswinds I've found but probably not much worse than any other city cars. I rate them and expect them to sell for decent money later on in excess of the wee C1/108/Aygo. I'd spend a bit more on a main dealer car though. Plus it'll be worth more than the Peugeot when you sell which will easily cover that t/belt change. Auto Trader:

www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/20170512536...3

A few quid extra spent on the 107 would land you the much improved approved used 108 from a dealer too. Good fun wee cars and very cheap to run. Not as refined but a good little car with very robust Daihatsu designed engine that will run and run if looked after. Auto Trader:

www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/20170331389...8

Above all though buy the one you enjoy driving, they're both great little cars. Pushed into a corner I'd take the 108 for the fun factor.

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - gordonbennet

I too would plump for the 108, that one at Welly looks a bargain compared to the old model at Gells which without searching around looks way overpriced, hardly unusual.

107 is a good little car, Aygo version in the younger family since new 2010, never broken down, eats front pads and discs which luckily are cheap as chips for DIY, very noisy from road roar which i had to soundproof (successfully) and the radio/speakers are worse than dreadful and i upgraded both, but its been reliable and cheap to run with the only out of service expense being a new clutch (£280 at Northants indy versus £700 quoted by the dealer, ludicrous), tyres very cheap.

108 should be an improvement.

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - sgreenwood
Thanks for the recommendations. I'll take a look at the 108 although our budget was £4.5k (max) ideally.

We're going to see the citigo again tomorrow and I'll see if they can somehow compensate for the belt change.

The 107 is at the high end price wise for what it is but I've haggled and it's low mileage does give it some justification.
Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - SLO76
" although our budget was £4.5k (max) ideally."

Is it a cash purchase?
Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - sgreenwood
We have a partex valued at £2k max.

It has an immediate £450 injector number 1 fault (Ford diesel) so selling it privately is difficult. If healthy it would fetch £3k privately.

My trusty Indy has said that ideally all 4 injectors need replacing in the next 12mths (£1200) plus a timing belt belt (100k miles). Hence selling it for something simpler.

So we have £2.5k cash plus trade in.

Edited by sgreenwood on 07/08/2017 at 23:33

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - SLO76
It would be cheaper in the long run to tale a cheap loan from your bank or one of the supermarket banks to get a better car up front.

On the subject of your trade-in. What age and mileage is it? Is there a EML lit on the dash with the injector fault and is it obvious to anyone assessing the car?
Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - Avant

A couple more things to bear in mind:

If you can find a Citigo (or Up or Mii) with the 74 bhp engine, it's worth it over the 60 bhp.

A big advantage of the Toyota Aygo is that it has a 5-year warranty, so your budget may well get you into one with a year or two remaining. Someone will correct me if I'm wrong, but I think hat the Peugeot and Citroen variants have just a 3-year warranty.

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - sgreenwood
" On the subject of your trade-in. What age and mileage is it? Is there a EML lit on the dash with the injector fault and is it obvious to anyone assessing the car?"

More info here;

www.honestjohn.co.uk/forum/post/index.htm?t=119331

My main issue is whether it would get to any garage before the fault reoccurred.

If I go for the 107/C1/Aygo it will likely be the Aygo due to warranty. There are a few older shaped models for just over £5k list within the Toyota dealership. There's a few newer shaped models around but they're just outside our budget.
Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - SLO76
£2k is a realistic valuation if that EML is out when they look it over. I can understand the desire to be rid of it and to be honest your low mileage doesn't suit a DPF equipped diesel anyway but I've seen these with well over 150k and the engine is basically a good design, in fact I flogged an ex driving school Pug 207 with the guts of 160k recently that runs fine. It may be worth properly diagnosing and replacing that one faulty injector though there's a possibility of a wiring fault too. I'd want a good auto electrician to look it over. We've one near by who's very useful for sorting issues like this cheaply. The petrol cars would be better suited to your driving though and it would avoid any hassle. Best of luck.
Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - sgreenwood
Thanks.

The wiring has been checked thoroughly and the diagnostic shows a fault with injector #1.

The fact that all 4 injectors are likely to need replacement soon - plus the other upcoming maintenance on the car - has made us decide to get a simpler car more suited to our needs.

I have found a Pug 108 for £5750 (with 12 mth warranty) so will try and haggle later today. If I need to find the extra £500 I guess it would be worth it for the newer shape.
Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - SLO76
"I have found a Pug 108 for £5750 (with 12 mth warranty) so will try and haggle later today. If I need to find the extra £500 I guess it would be worth it for the newer shape."

It's well worth it even if you have to dig behind the sofa. It'll cost less in the long run as the 108 will be worth more than the older car when you sell too plus the issues with the clutch and timing chain on the 107 are supposed to have been dealt with so there's less likelihood of problems.
Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - RichardW

Didn't they fix the short lived clutch issue by fitting the larger diameter Yaris clutch from relatively early in the production run?

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - gordonbennet

Didn't they fix the short lived clutch issue by fitting the larger diameter Yaris clutch from relatively early in the production run?

2009 i believe, the family 2010 model has the larger clutch though it was about shot at 45k, but then it spent a long time in south herts and north london traffic.

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - SLO76

Didn't they fix the short lived clutch issue by fitting the larger diameter Yaris clutch from relatively early in the production run?

Yes but 108 is supposed to be an improvement on this as even later 107's were burning through them. Largely due to the volume of young inexperienced and elderly drivers to be fair.

Edited by SLO76 on 08/08/2017 at 20:04

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - sgreenwood
Amazingly I've come into some money (I've overpaid my student loan & am now debt free!) so was thinking of putting in an extra few hundred pounds.

This brings the 1.2 Citroen C1 into range potentially which has alloys and a rear camera. Whilst these are unnecessary the additional power may come in useful as we're rural(ish) and in a valley.

However, I've read that the 1.2 version is a Peugeot/ Citroen engine whereas the 1.0 litre is Toyota developed.

Is the extra power worth it (mixed feedback online) and does the 1.2 still have a chain driven engine like the 1.0? Is either engine likely to be more reliable than the other?

Edited by sgreenwood on 10/08/2017 at 00:08

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - SLO76
"However, I've read that the 1.2 version is a Peugeot/ Citroen engine whereas the 1.0 litre is Toyota developed.

Is the extra power worth it (mixed feedback online) and does the 1.2 still have a chain driven engine like the 1.0? Is either engine likely to be more reliable than the other?"

The 1.0 is a Daihatsu (owned by Toyota) design and will last well into 6 figures if it sees oil every year or 10k.

The 1.2 is a PSA Puretech unit that has a timing belt which I believe runs in an oil bath much like Fords 1.0 Ecoboost. I can't find any info about belt change intervals but they're likely to be quite long if it is in an oil bath. It's a well liked wee engine and adds a bit of extra poke but I'd stick with the trusted 1.0 which will be easier to sell on and is perfectly adequate in the 108/C1.






Edited by SLO76 on 10/08/2017 at 00:44

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - Dovile
Amazingly I've come into some money (I've overpaid my student loan & am now debt free!) so was thinking of putting in an extra few hundred pounds. This brings the 1.2 Citroen C1 into range potentially which has alloys and a rear camera. Whilst these are unnecessary the additional power may come in useful as we're rural(ish) and in a valley. However, I've read that the 1.2 version is a Peugeot/ Citroen engine whereas the 1.0 litre is Toyota developed. Is the extra power worth it (mixed feedback online) and does the 1.2 still have a chain driven engine like the 1.0? Is either engine likely to be more reliable than the other?

we have both a 2013/13 peugeot 107 access, and a 2016/16 c1 feel with 1.2 puretech 82.

firstly; nothing gone wrong with the older peugeot 107 in the 4.5 years we've owned it. we do intend to keep hold of it for as long as it lasts us.

the newer model c1 car feels a bit better in all key aspects, though...just seems a more sturdy and capable machine all-round. purchased with 10 miles on clock in april 2016, ours has since covered another 42,000miles - so very thoroughly used in this short time! it is a 'feel' variant, so no alloys/reverse camera, etc., that you have mentioned.

the slower/more common 1.0 68 vti engine available gets these moving well enough, but with our driving (as you can imagine with the mileage we do, a lot of longer/higher speed journeys) we find the 1.2 puretech 82's extra torque just makes things easier going. the toyota-sourced 1.0 engine's gearchange is a bit better + more precise feeling to use than the psa 1.2 engine, so maybe this is a consideration if you're going to see a lot of stop-start traffic, or if a newer driver will be operating this vehicle. weight differential between the cars is only something like 25kg, so the modest increase in power from the 1.2 is still noticeable i think. we achieve mpg in the mid-to-high 50s, which works out at around £0.085 per mile driven in fuel costs.

the citroen-peugeot-toyota triplets - of both older and newer generations - come highly recommended from our lot :}

Edited by Dovile on 10/08/2017 at 17:37

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - sgreenwood
Thanks - the C1/108/Aygo certainly do seem cracking cars. It's amazing how many you see around when you look for them! They also seem to hold their value well!

We're going to see some over the weekend as more are cropping up In our price range.

We're pretty sure we're going this route but have found two alternatives.

Kia Picanto- high mileage (for age) but the warranty until Feb 2022 is appealing to me!:

www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/20170621664...3

Fiat Panda. Low mileage and looks great with good reviews. However it's pricey and I'm concerned at the overly low usage and low remaining warranty. We had a Fiat Punto (56 plate) that was a dog and it's very memory is putting me off (although I understand they're better now):

www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/20170703701...3

Any feedback to add to the above?

I really do appreciate everyone's advice so far. Whilst it's not a lot of money car-wise to many, to us it is and I'm obviously wanting to cart my family around as safely and cheaply as possible!
Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - SLO76
Both the Picanto and Panda are very good little cars. The wee Fiat is a favourite holiday hire car of mine, if it's an option I take it. Slow but fun to drive, solid, simple and practical. They last well and cost buttons. The 1.2 is the best engine for reliability. Not the best motorway companion but again neither are any of these city cars. Don't touch the diesel or the Twin air.

The Picanto is very robust and again a pleasant little car to drive. A bit more modern and standards of quality and general engineering are higher than the Panda which uses an engine that dates back to the 80's. But I personally like the box on wheels simplicity of the Fiat. Remember though, that 7yr warranty is only valid if it has a full Kia main dealer service history. Don't listen to anyone (particularly salesmen) who tell you otherwise. No dealer history then no warranty.

If I was buying myself though I'd still favour the Japanese engined 1.0 108/C1 or Skoda Citigo.

Edited by SLO76 on 11/08/2017 at 00:52

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - sgreenwood
The Kia definitely has a full dealer service history - I phoned their service department to check and they gave some history on the car (all good). We're off to take a test drive later today. Having sat in it momentarily it did seem quite refined. Not as quirky as the C1/108/Aygo but more grown up.

Thank you for all your help again. We'll let you know how we get on.
Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - sgreenwood
Ps: I linked the wrong picanto above;

www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/20170723764...0
Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - SLO76
I personally would be aiming for a lower spec with less mileage. With your usage this will be over 80k and pretty much valueless within 2yrs plus those polished alloys tend to deteriorate very quickly on Kia's. Otherwise a good little car.

Did spot this at a nearby Suzuki dealer though. A brilliant little thing to drive and as an approved used car at a main dealer it comes with a years Suzuki warranty. Tell them to shove that £149 "admin fee" though, it's a tactic many dealers are trying now. It's a way to kill any discount negotiations. They 'give' you the car without the admin fee and act as if you should be grateful! Ignore it in any discussions and walk away if they refuse. Auto Trader:

www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/20170616649...3

Seen this too.. Auto Trader:

www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/20170702698...9

Edited by SLO76 on 11/08/2017 at 09:22

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - sgreenwood

Finally got our hands on a new motor!

www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/20170711727...1

Deposit paid and hopefully collecting it soon.

We haggled to get 12months warranty included, a few stone chips touched up on the front bumper and the rear seat back swapped from another 108 they're selling as there was some heavy wear on the rear fabric.

I feel that this is a good deal due to the improvements over the 107 and hopefully the car should provide some happy motoring.

Once again, thank you for all your help.

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - badbusdriver

Your link doesn't work, presumably because you have bought the car!.

We got a loan of the 108's sister car, the C1, last year when our car was getting some repairs done. Brilliant little thing, full of fizz and bursting with energy, like a puppy!. Hope it serves you well.

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - sgreenwood
Lol. Usually dealers take a while to update Autotrader but not this one!

I've put the link to the dealer site below.

I certainly enjoyed the test drive as it zooms away from a standing start (until about 20mph :0) ).

www.eastmidlandscarcentre.co.uk/used-peugeot-108-l...6

Edited by sgreenwood on 11/08/2017 at 21:27

Skoda Citigo - Citigo Vs. 107 - SLO76
Entertaining little cars and cheap as chips to run. Good choice, hope it serves you well.
 

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