Oil help - Mike2828
Just looking for some advice on my car.

I need to know the best method to drain my engine oil out of my 2013 Vauxhall Corsa.

I've been searching the web for the answer but had no luck.

It's the 1.7 CDTI diesel version with 123bhp, if this helps.

Thanks in advance.

Mike
Oil help - Falkirk Bairn

Youtube!

www.youtube.com/watch?v=WwB99lHaGbU

Oil help - Mike2828
Hi there,

Thank you for the link, however my car is different to that one, under the bonnet mine looks completely different, I tried following a similar video however this turned out near on impossible.
Oil help - RobJP

The BEST way to drain the oil - and as much as possible of the contaminants and sedimented crud in it - is via the sump plug.

Oil help - brum

Errm, if youre having to ask such a basic question then perhaps its safer to let your local garage do the oil change.

Oil help - RT

Errm, if youre having to ask such a basic question then perhaps its safer to let your local garage do the oil change.

Excellent advice - if the OP asks around for a good local independent they may even let him/her watch.

It also avoids the issue of having to dispose of the used oil which requires suitable size containers and a trip to your local recycling depot.

Edited by RT on 18/04/2017 at 19:11

Oil help - Andrew-T

'The best method' as has been said, is to drain via the sump plug soon after driving far enough to get the oil warm (several miles for a diesel).

Your problem may be that your car probably has a large sump tray, and the only easy way to do the job is under a hoist. Ramps may give you enough wiggle room, but jacks are best avoided. Work in the engine compartment of modern cars is difficult without proper equipment, and handbooks often don't show you where drain plugs are. Is there a place near you where you can DIY with garage gear?

Oil help - John Boy

You might do better to ask on the Technical Matters section of this website:

www.honestjohn.co.uk/forum/threads.htm?f=4

Failing that, try this Vauxhall owners forum:

tinyurl.com/kle3jke

Oil help - Ethan Edwards

Used engine oil. Mix with 70% creocote (wickes b&q etc) and use mixture to paint garden fence. Neatly disposing of said problem very cheaply and preserving your fence with it.

Or take it to your local amenity tip if you can't be bothered.

Oil help - RT

Used engine oil. Mix with 70% creocote (wickes b&q etc) and use mixture to paint garden fence. Neatly disposing of said problem very cheaply and preserving your fence with it.

Or take it to your local amenity tip if you can't be bothered.

The sale of creosote and other coal tar wood preservatives has been banned since 2003 - it's legal to use up domestic stocks. Modern wood preservatives work in a different way.

Dispose of used oil at your local amenity tip.

Oil help - galileo

Used engine oil. Mix with 70% creocote (wickes b&q etc) and use mixture to paint garden fence. Neatly disposing of said problem very cheaply and preserving your fence with it.

Or take it to your local amenity tip if you can't be bothered.

The sale of creosote and other coal tar wood preservatives has been banned since 2003 - it's legal to use up domestic stocks. Modern wood preservatives work in a different way.

Dispose of used oil at your local amenity tip.

Ethan was suggesting 'Creocote' not creosote, this is oil-based but apparently quite legal.

Oil help - jc2

I've been told creosote is avaiable again-it's been realized that modern replacements are even more harmful.

Oil help - John F

The BEST method is not only to drain when warm, but also tilt the car slightly so that the outlet really is the lowest point, and (something the pros never do) leave for several hours to drip. You'll be surprised how much old oil has stuck to the innards of the engine.

Use the old oil not only for fences, but garden stakes, painting on the underside of subframes (cars and lawn mowers) and other potential rusty bits like springs. I use it in my chainsaw (lubrication, not as 2stroke oil) and (the better quality used Audi oil) for my lawnmower engine.

Here's a tip for gardeners with mole incursions (you won't find this in the gardening mags). Carefully remove the molehill and find the hole. Pour in 500mls of old engine oil. Exit moles!

Oil help - quizman

Are you sure your mole tips are fully legal? Where do they go?

As many posters have said OP, please take your car to a garage and let them do it for you.

Oil help - John F

Are you sure your mole tips are fully legal?

No, I'm not a lawyer. But oily paws and a bad smell seems more humane than crushing them to death with a mole trap which is what I used to do.

Where do they go?

I have no idea - they live underground. Presumably back where they came from; either next door's garden or the adjacent field.

As many posters have said OP, please take your car to a garage and let them do it for you.

Do so if you wish, but they won't do it as well as you could do it following my advice in the post above. And you can never be sure of the type and quality of the oil they use.

Oil help - alan1302

I've been told creosote is avaiable again-it's been realized that modern replacements are even more harmful.

It's always been avaialble - although not sold to general public anymore

Oil help - Andrew-T

I've been told creosote is avaiable again-it's been realized that modern replacements are even more harmful.

It's always been avaialble - although not sold to general public anymore

Traditional creosote used to come from gasworks - i.e. coal distillation. Where does that happen nowadays?

 

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