Rust - Project C

Hi all

I had a quick gander underneath our cars today, and in & around the engine compartments. I noticed a bit of rust on the undersides of both and also quite a lot on some of the static components under the engine. The main (visible) bodywork of both is fine with no visible rust (I did manage to rip off some of that faux chrome on the kia's grille through over zealous jet washing!).

Anyone know much about what is normal in terms of rust and what is potentially problematic? For example what i should be looking for. Or how I can do anything preventative? I am a total novice when it comes to anything mechanical.

Thanks

Rust - bathtub tom
I did manage to rip off some of that faux chrome on the kia's grille through over zealous jet washing!).

Ditch the jet washer, as you've found it's quite capable of removing protective coatings!

I just wash the car with a hose and soft brush, but I rigorously hose down (up?) the underside and wheel arches to remove road grit and salt.

Surface rust you don't need to worry about, but once it becomes pitted then you should consider a coating such as waxoil, dinitrol or similar. Remember a pressure washer will remove such coatings!

Rust - focussed

A useful tip regarding pressure washing - don't jetwash directly through the front grille onto the radiator/oilcooler/aftercooler/aircon heat exchanger - it can damage the delicate fins on the matrix (matrices?)

Any cheap common product such as WD40 will hold the rust back unless you want to get serious about it. By serious I mean something like ACF 50 which I use on motorbikes and recently on cars. You can buy it in aerosol form at about £10 per 400ml or as a liquid - about £30 a litre.

Originally formulated as an anti-corrosion treatment for aircraft airframes it is an amazing product for keeping corrosion at bay.

(Edit - Sorry, its a bit dearer than I said www.nippynormans.com/search?q=acf+50)

( Avant - Not an advert - it's just the best stuff there is!)

Edited by focussed on 15/04/2017 at 00:32

Rust - Avant

No problem Focussed - you've been with us for some years and I'd never suspect you of advertising!

Rust - Stanb Sevento

Its disappointing that there is any rust on a car in this day and age, what happened to all the Zinc coated steel and high tech primers. I was a great believer in Waxoil for many years and used it on every car I got but find it unnecessary now. I bought an early MX5 and had no confidence Mazda had got on top of their rust problem so set about it with my Waxoil. Every nook and cranny, in the cills, boors,wheel arches and every cavity I could get it into. A whole 5Lt can used, the car stank of it. A couple of days later went on a trip from Scotland to London to pick up a hard top for it and stopped for a bite to eat. I was embarrassed getting back to the car, it had a pool of melted Waxoil all round it, melted by the rising heat from the car. Nothing I could do, but there was not a spec of rust on that car five years later.

Rust - corax
Anyone know much about what is normal in terms of rust and what is potentially problematic? For example what i should be looking for. Or how I can do anything preventative? I am a total novice when it comes to anything mechanical

Just make sure that the structural parts of the underneath of the car are sound - crossmembers, subframes, sills. They can all be prone to rust according to how the car has been used and where, and previous owner care.

Also look at the steel brake pipes where they emerge from their plastic coating near the calipers, a favourite weak point, and an annoying and costly fix as the labour can be expensive for replacing a virtually sound brake pipe save for rust on one small part of it.

Everyone has their favourite rust preventing products, mine is Bilt Hamber Dynax UB, a spray anti corrosion wax.

Modern cars are very good bodywise, but the parts mentioned above will still rust, as can suspension components, but as long as it's only a bit of surface rust, you should be OK. Sometimes things can happen like the drain holes for the suspension turrets blocking up and filling the void with a nice salty soup that will end up with the spring pan collapsing and the car scraping the road. A quick inspection with the wheels off to check suspension and brakes on all four corners every now and then should stop any of this happening.

Edited by corax on 15/04/2017 at 12:33

Rust - John F

Every summer, grease the brake pipes (the ones on my 37yr old TR7 are the originals). Mechanics love to fail them at the slightest sign of corrosion. Every year or two, run it up on ramps, get underneath and apply old engine oil (you should have a copious supply if you change it yourself). Use an old pan and toothbrush, scrub it onto anything that either looks rusty, or looks as if it might be prone to rust. Especially subframe seams. Deal with anything that appears at the edges of wings or the seams at the bottom of doors asap with a flat blade screwdriver and a bottle of Kurust or similar.

Rust - gordonbennet

Steady on John, its deemed too risky foolish to change your own wheel these days, and some people can barely lift the bonnet nor find the dipstick let alone cope with an oil change, and you're expecting people to get under their cars and their hands dirty doing something to stop them rusting away.

I admire your optimism.:-)

I had a clean MOT pass on the Landcruiser Thursday, 20 litres diff/transfer box oil has arrived, as has 20 litres Dexron6 for the auto box, will have to check my stocks to see how much Bilt Hambers finest rustproofing products i need, and am looking forward to getting really stuck in over the coming weeks, just need a couple of rainy days to soften up any muck still in place underneath then it will be up on the 4 ramps, waterproofs on, then full underbody pressure washing (i have a 90' elbow for getting into awkward spots so i can flush through the whole of the ladder chassis and then allow it a week or so to dry before getting down to business.

Looking after vehicles properly gives a great deal of satisfaction.

Rust - NARU
...

I had a clean MOT pass on the Landcruiser Thursday, 20 litres diff/transfer box oil has arrived, as has 20 litres Dexron6 for the auto box, will have to check my stocks to see how much Bilt Hambers finest rustproofing products i need, and am looking forward to getting really stuck in over the coming weeks, just need a couple of rainy days to soften up any muck still in place underneath then it will be up on the 4 ramps, waterproofs on, then full underbody pressure washing (i have a 90' elbow for getting into awkward spots so i can flush through the whole of the ladder chassis and then allow it a week or so to dry before getting down to business.

Looking after vehicles properly gives a great deal of satisfaction.

As an ex-LC owner, pay special attention to the rear diff housing. Also the aircon pipes.

Rust - gordonbennet

Thanks Marlot,

I selected this particular LC5 for its impeccable history (well heeled previous owner syndrome) and excellent condition especially underneath, i can't find any evidence of it ever being off road, the rear live axle is in superb condition as is the rest of the underbody, the only part thats suffered is the sump guard.

Glad for the input though, as you well know not all LC's are in such good nick.

Is the Sorento proving to be a good one?

Edited by gordonbennet on 16/04/2017 at 21:14

Rust - NARU

Thanks Marlot,

I selected this particular LC5 for its impeccable history (well heeled previous owner syndrome) and excellent condition especially underneath, i can't find any evidence of it ever being off road, the rear live axle is in superb condition as is the rest of the underbody, the only part thats suffered is the sump guard.

Glad for the input though, as you well know not all LC's are in such good nick.

Is the Sorento proving to be a good one?

You have a good memory! Yes, I'm very happy with the Sorento, though I miss the LC from time to time - mostly when I fancy going off road a little.

The Sorento is up to 12,000 miles now in 9 months. It's very easy to drive, and the latest satnav update has even given my android auto satnav, which is amazing.

Rust - Big John

Every summer, grease the brake pipes (the ones on my 37yr old TR7 are the originals). Mechanics love to fail them at the slightest sign of corrosion. Every year or two, run it up on ramps, get underneath and apply old engine oil (you should have a copious supply if you change it yourself). Use an old pan and toothbrush, scrub it onto anything that either looks rusty, or looks as if it might be prone to rust. Especially subframe seams. Deal with anything that appears at the edges of wings or the seams at the bottom of doors asap with a flat blade screwdriver and a bottle of Kurust or similar.

Totally agreer re greasing brake pipes , never failed an mot on this since I started doing this. Painting on oil can be effective but NEVER use OLD used engine oil :-

1) It's carcinogenic

2) It's acid and despite stopping rust can attack the metal directly. I remember helping friends pick up an old Morris Bulnose engine that had been stored (dumped) up ended/ on its side. Where the crank had been submerged in old oil it was heavily pitted/damaged

In addition to painting on new oil an letting soak in for a while then painting on waxoyl underseal on top is uber effective.

Internally always used a warm oil waxoyl combo

Recently returned to a Moggy Minor I restored in 1988 and most of the underside was still tacky

PS on it's own waxoyl less effective - sits on top of "layered" rust but doesn't soak in

Edited by Big John on 16/04/2017 at 23:45

Rust - John F

1) It's carcinogenic

Not particularly. Prolonged exposure of experimental mice can occasionally produce a case in one of them. I usually wear gloves (which are also possibly carcinogenic).

It's acid and despite stopping rust can attack the metal directly. I remember helping friends pick up an old Morris Bulnose engine that had been stored (dumped) up ended/ on its side. Where the crank had been submerged in old oil it was heavily pitted/damaged

Gosh - you must be old! My grandfather had a Morris Bullnose after the 1stWW. Perhaps the old oil was floating on water which might have been the culprit? And I suspect my old oil is considerably less acidic, especially if not exposed to acid rain if it was outside for a number of years!

Rust - Project C

Thanks all for your replies.

The car has spent some time in the lake district so wet and likely salty.

It just looks to be the front subframe predominantly but I'll get it sorted asap.

Rust - Andrew-T

It just looks to be the front subframe predominantly but I'll get it sorted asap.

As a subframe is a solid load-bearing structure it will need a serious degree of rust penetration to cause any problems. Rust in the surronding parts of the bodyshell are another matter.

 

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