When does a car "wear out"? - NickS
As I am currently in the process of buying a 2nd car, and thinking about replacing the other due to a drastic increase in mileage, I was pondering at what mileage a car really starts to wear out?

I currently have an '05 Golf GT-TDI, which is just coming up for 78k miles. My initial plan had been that SWMBO would take over the use of that for her new 70 mile a day commute, and I would spend circa £2-3k on something a little more fun for my 15 mile round trip, such as a Volvo C70.

C70 plans firmly in place, it occured to me that with SWMBO's new annual mileage of circa 20k is going to quickly stack miles on my already above average miles Golf, and as such it might be worth chopping it in now, whilst its still worth something, for a slightly newer, lower mileage example. Maybe an Auris/Civic 2.2.

My Golf plus £3k should see us right, but at what mileage do cars start to wear out. Most C70's im looking at are knocking on 100k, and my Golf will be the same this time next year. Do major components such as Gearboxes etc start packing up once a car is into triple figure territory?
When does a car "wear out"? - piston power
Your golf is not worn out but it's just run in!

It will do starship miles if you look after it the key is oil changes neglect is what happens to cars owners extend servicing to 18 months or never at all or just top up the oil when it's low and never change it.

If it's done regular it will live plenty of cars with over 100k on the clock and sound sweet.

The gearbox should live for some more miles yet.
When does a car "wear out"? - SpamCan61 {P}
The common wear factor on my succession of 150K+ vauxhalls is suspension bushes, they're about the only thing I've had to consistently replace / put up with the clonking.
When does a car "wear out"? - astrabob
Based on my experience of 'mainstream cars' (VW Polo, Ford Escort, two Peugeot 405s, Citroen ZX, Astra diesel):-

Up to 100k miles, with regular servicing, relatively little goes wrong. Occasional larger repair (e.g. starter motor), just tyres and brake pads etc.

Between 100k and 200k miles, larger repairs become a bit more common. Might include shock absorbers, alternators, starter motors, brake calipers, batteries, clutches etc. As the car has lost almost all its value, generally provides economical driving. With regular servicing no reason why reliability should be a problem. I've driven (mostly) high mileage cars for 20 years, and in that time called out breakdown services twice.

Above 200k miles, keep a careful eye on the repair bills. You need to use your judgement when to get rid of the car and swop for a new one. Currently my wife's car (the Astra diesel listed above) has 230k miles. Apart from needing (another) starter motor recently, its still not doing too bad.

With regular servicing, no reason why the engine should wear out. I've never had a manual gearbox fail (although I know someone who did, probably because of low gearbox oil). New clutches can be expensive, as can misfuelling a diesel.

Hope this helps.
When does a car "wear out"? - Bill Payer
Cars today seem to wear out with time rather than mileage - had to replace suspension on two of our cars (Merc and SEAT) at 40K & 34K miles respectively, but both are 5 years old.

I would imagine a 5 year Golf might need some suspension and brake work but then might be OK for another 5 years., unless the commute is an arduous journey.
When does a car "wear out"? - stunorthants26
Unless a car has major engine or gearbox failure, no car really wears out anymore, they just become beyond economic repair, which is a judgement for the individual. You would have to go some mileage to physically wear a car out. More likely a fiendish electrical problem would cause scrapping nowadays.
On a high mileage car I would think either big bills that you dont have the stomach for or fear of breakdown would be the limiting factors, but on a car you know well, the sky is the limit really.
When does a car "wear out"? - primeradriver
Unless a car has major engine or gearbox failure no car really wears out anymore
they just become beyond economic repair which is a judgement for the individual.


Was just about to say the same thing.

As a general rule of thumb, a car becomes "worn out" a few years after its value drops below a grand.

Basically because after that point, most people don't maintain it as well, and it pretty much falls apart.

A brand new car from BMW would be essentially knackered at about 5 or 6 years old if it was utterly neglected from day one.

Whereas a Proton, lovingly looked after regardless of cost, should be still trundling along at 20-25 years old.
When does a car "wear out"? - Andrew-T
It might be worth chopping it in now


False logic. If you keep the Golf and use it as described, it will clearly lose value. But if you chop it in for something newer, that car used in the same way will clearly lose much more. But hey - if you have the money and just want to change, who cares? Just don't kid yourself that it makes financial sense, that's all ...
When does a car "wear out"? - Rattle
My dads is a good example. The engine and gearbox are fine, there is no smoke and it pulls well. However the leather steering wheel is very worn and it clonks like mad even though half the bushes have already been replaced.

Since we have had the car my dads done 25,000 miles in it, about 80% of repairs have been suspension related. Its on 85k now.

I've put nearly 200 miles on it in the past couple of weeks I have been using it. I believe the engine and gearbox are good for another 40k but the bodywork won't last beyond another two years.
When does a car "wear out"? - barney100
The fact is that as soon as you get a newer car the whole process starts again! up go the miles and in a few short years you go through it all again. I'm beginning to realise I change cars because I just fancy a change and I would be better off running the old one 'til the tin worm or MOT man writes it off. I'm on 2.5 years with this car and counting.
When does a car "wear out"? - Rattle
Which fine until the VOSA man spot you and there are more and more of them. These days you have to keep thwe car upto MOT standard all the time and when a car gets to a certain age it gets very expensive.

When does a car "wear out"? - primeradriver
What is that "certain age" though Rattle?

Your experiences do not reflect mine. I am used to cars that manage stupid mileages and last until the body rots out -- witness my 10 year old Primera petrol with 260K on the clock, or my 12, nearly 13 year old Daewoo with no tin-worm and an engine that purrs at 80K.

Perhaps you buy the wrong cars!!! (Or they aren't looked after....).

Only faults I've experienced are the usual daft things -- ABS rings on the Primera (NOT expensive -- the CV joint is £25 and has the rings built-in), ABS sensor and idle control valve on the Daewoo (£40 and £20 respectively), droplinks and control arms on both (£10/£25).

Only problem I've experienced is actually getting the bits at a reasonable price -- factors have your eyes out sometimes with Asian parts, yet they're dirt-cheap if you find them online.
When does a car "wear out"? - corax
There are plenty of cars out there capable of massive mileage now. I must admit I've changed some of my cars for the sake of change, but I didn't really need to. I'm hanging on to the one I've got until it's uneconomical to repair, which doesn't look like anytime soon.

If you're the worrying type who thinks it's the end of the world if the dampers start getting worn or the gearbox has an almost interceptable whine, then you're going to change your car well before it really needs changing.

The main drivetrain (engine, gearbox, diff) on most cars is pretty resilient if serviced regularly. Things like dampers, bushes, belts, brakes are all consumables and are easy and cheap enough to change. If this is done, a high mileage car won't feel like one to drive, and saves money over buying a low mileage replacement.
When does a car "wear out"? - Snakey
When does a car "wear out"?

Usually about a week after I've bought it.... :-(
When does a car "wear out"? - Rattle
It depeneds how the car is being used. E.g I have put 200 miles on my dads Fiesta and its all stop start city traffic and lots of turning. I must have changed gear about 1000 times or more in it. I could have done the same 200 miles on the motorway and caused no wear at all.

There is not much in cars these days people can be smug about their old jap cars but it is down to the type of owners as much as anything else.
When does a car "wear out"? - primeradriver
> There is not much in cars these days people can be smug about their old jap cars but it is down to the type of owners as much as anything else.

Absolutely. And it's a function of depreciation as well -- a lot of depreciation disaster zones die quickly because they fall into the wrong hands at an early age.

It's not a question of being smug -- I have already said that any car should manage it.

What has impressed me about the Primera is that I haven't looked after it all that well over the last 18 months or so -- and still it keeps going without major fault.

Believe me the first time the HG goes, or the box lets go or the rust gets it or any of the other things you seem to have problems with it'll be out the door.

Cars are almost too good these days. Your cars, from your descriptions of them are relatively bad ones IME. A HG should never fail on a well-sorted engine. You've been spectacularly unlucky.

BTW if I've read between the lines right you're implying that the Nissan has lasted because it's been mollycoddled. But 260K?

Edited by primeradriver on 15/02/2010 at 21:25

When does a car "wear out"? - rtj70
My uncles Jaguar XK140 and MG TF are in road worthy condition and not worn out. Other classics he's had also been in good condition.

Is this not just a question of how much one would spend to keep them going? You wouldn't for a Ford KA but might for a classic Jaguar.
When does a car "wear out"? - Victorbox
These days I think a car is worn out when the owner is bored with it and looking for an excuse to change it.
When does a car "wear out"? - Rattle
Indeed. Both our cars are pretty close to the scrap yard. My Corsa is perfectly fine but the gearbox is whining and it needs a new engine or a major rebuild. The rest of it isn't worn because I have spent so much on it.

My dads Fiesta has a good engine and box and could be kept on the road for many more years but because labour is so high garage bills mean it will be cheaper to scrap it and get something else.

Edited by Webmaster on 16/02/2010 at 01:34

When does a car "wear out"? - primeradriver
> it will be cheaper to scrap it and get something else.

Oh I am constantly tempted by the cheap, much newer metal out there.

For the Primera, a bunch of four year old Mondeos for £3200. For the Daewoo, a steady stream of 5 or 6 year old mid-size Kias for £1100 -- both very very tempting in their own ways. But why should I change?

I often *want* the cars to fail... but they don't.
When does a car "wear out"? - WellKnownSid
In many parts of southern Europe, never!

Here in Spain, people don't believe that anything over three years old is possessed by the devil. Add in the economics of left hand drive, the non-existance of the tin worm, and the fact that any back street mechanic will rebuild an engine for a handful of euros - and you have the perfect recipe for retro motoring!
When does a car "wear out"? - Rattle
There is two problems with the UK.

1) New cars are very cheap compared with labour costs of garages.
2) New cars are cheap in terms of peoples income
3) Even back street garages now charge £50 an hour labour, this means what was once a routine fault such as a head gasket is now rendering cars scrap.
4) Rust - It is becoming less and less of a problem but it rains so much here that it does cause problems.
5) Snobbery in the UK, everybody has to keep up with the Jone's.
When does a car "wear out"? - SpamCan61 {P}
The OP's original question was about what parts wear out though, not the pros and cons of Bangernomics as such.

So I'll stick to suspension; and maybe clutch if a car has done a lot of round town miles. I'm taking brakes / exhaust and other service items as read, although exhausts seem to last much better than the used to in my experience.
When does a car "wear out"? - Bill Payer
I note the OP's car is a VW turbo diesel.

I don't know whether some types are more badly affected than others but a colleagues VW Touareg 2.5 diesel just needed £4500 spending on it at 80K miles. It needed new glow plugs, new injectors, new high pressure pump and something else to do with the inlet manifold, and I think new fuel lines too as the seals were suspect on the old ones.

I've seen this with other TD cars - Ford TDCI's apparently are very difficult to diagnose as they get older. I guess like my pal's VW, each part wearing a bit is, together, enough to cause all sorts of problems.
When does a car "wear out"? - madf
In the past 10 years I have adopted a policy of never buying a car from a manufacturer with consistent design or quality problems.. which means never buying a new model until it has had 4 years road experience to show faults.

On that basis, never buy Mercedes.. see the current thread on blue efficiency..

Or Vauxhall.

Or Mazda diesels .
Or Renault anything...

Works for me.

Our 106 is now 17 and still going strong despite a diet of only very short journeys. Starts first time. The design was 2-3 years# old when we bought it and mechanically it has been strong .. and bodily very little rust. Sympathetic maintenance is a must...of course..

Garaging helps as well..

# 10 years old if you include the AX on which it was based...

Edited by madf on 16/02/2010 at 08:48

When does a car "wear out"? - Cliff Pope
Never.
All that wears out is your willingness to pay for repairs for a car that has become an unfashionable wreck.
In the third world the only limit is the skill of the local blacksmith.

Edited by Cliff Pope on 16/02/2010 at 08:53

When does a car "wear out"? - NickS
Hmmmm, interesting stuff. If im honest, then I probably am looking for an excuse to change, purely because I get bored. Reality is that my Golf has been lovingly cared for over the 30k miles I have had it, only filled up with Shell V-Power, regular oil changes, washed every other week etc, and its proably better the devil I know than something unknown.

The Volvos I have been looking at with 100k on the clock hardly look run in. Ive seen a couple of scruffy uncared for T5's but on the whole they all seem to have weathered the storm of time pretty well.

When does a car "wear out"? - Mapmaker
Stunorthants>> Unless a car has major engine or gearbox failure, no car really wears out
>>anymore, they just become beyond economic repair,

To me that has nothing to do with wearing out. A blown up engine, with a 5k bill on a 3k car is single major component failure.

A worn out car is one that might be worth £1,000 were it not for requiring:

1. A new exhaust, the current one held together with paste, a tin can and jubilee clips (£300)
2. 4 new tyres (£400)
3. New engine mounts (£400)
4. A bit of welding (£300)
5. A new wheel bearing (£200)
6. New wiper blades (£10)
7. The radiator leaks a bit
8. It drips oil everywhere
9. New suspension bushes (£200)
etc. etc.

None of these items is a major, sudden failure. They all relate to long-term wearing out. None of these, of itself, will write a car off. The combination, however...


When does a car "wear out"? - primeradriver
Agreed MM, and if that £1000 car had a different badge on it and was thus worth £2500, it wouldn't be "worn out" by that measure.

That is why I stand by my original statement that a car is worn out a period of time after it dips below £1000 in value. For a Proton that might be three years old, for a VW probably 12.

Which makes cars like the old Micra all the more remarkable given that some have been worth less than a grand for the last 15 years and are still hauling themselves around!
When does a car "wear out"? - Mapmaker
>>That is why I stand by my original statement that a car is worn out a period of time after it dips below £1000 in value.

No. There is no absolute. If the car is a luxury car, the limit might be 5k below which things just don't get fixed.
When does a car "wear out"? - oldgit
My cars wear out (in my mind) when they are three years old or more and I have the indignity of having to take them for their MOTs. It's then that I yearn for another new car and that lovely new car smell.
Oh, well, I've have had my car 6 months now and so have another 30 months or so to go until I get that feeling again. New car, new tyres, new exhaust and new everything and at least 3 year's warrantee - bliss.
When does a car "wear out"? - Brian Tryzers
One of my worries in this area has just receded. I'd been concerned at the cost of replacing the six airbags in my seven-and-a-half-year-old S60 at the ten-year mark recommended in the manual. But it seems that in 2003 (mine dates from October 2002) Volvo changed its advice - even for older cars - to an inspection at ten years and eventual replacement at 15.

The reasoning seems to be that in 1994, when the ten-year mark was set, airbags were so new that no-one really knew how long they'd last. Experience since then has been that they're durable enough to go on for longer.

Which leaves only the split in the upholstery and the crack in one radio knob as possible justifications for replacing my car; not really enough, is it?

Edited by WillDeBeest on 16/02/2010 at 14:36

When does a car "wear out"? - primeradriver
No. There is no absolute. If the car is a luxury car the limit might
be 5k below which things just don't get fixed.


I'd call that the exception that proves the rule to be honest. Luxury cars are always in a class of their own.

I was thinking specifically of mundane cars.

I think it hits on the my basic way of looking at cheap cars. As I say most ordinary cars will start to fail around 5 years after they hit a certain value, be it £1000 or whatever, but there is some variation.

The key to a good model is to identify the age at which the car hits that price point, then look at how many cars older than it are still going compared to how many were sold in the first place.

If you can come up with a good guesstimate for that equation you've got what older cars represent the best value, measured in terms of how long you'll get out of them for the money -- it's no good looking for a £1000 car and looking at cars that last 20 years if the only ones you can afford are 21 -- the car that lasts eight but you can get a three year old example of for the same money is a better bet.
When does a car "wear out"? - piston power
Over the last few months i have seen a few vauxhall cavaliers mk3 sri now these must make a good old banger still going strong.

H plate so 1991 still going nothing too expensive to repair back then and reliable old bus.
When does a car "wear out"? - primeradriver
Over the last few months i have seen a few vauxhall cavaliers mk3 sri now
these must make a good old banger still going strong.


There were a load of these sold as well which skews your viewpoint on them.

I had a high-mileage Mk3 Cavalier in around 2002. Whole load of trouble -- steady stream of niggly daft problems that cost small amounts each time but added up to quite a bit.

No better than average IME.
When does a car "wear out"? - madf
Of course, if you are into marginal motoring - which if a car is over 10 years old , you HAVE to be (just to get cheapish spares).. then
You buy a car which is reasonably plentiful
..

You look for spares from breakers, surplus stock and ebay..

No-one in their right mind spends £4,000 for a new engine for a 10 year old Toyota Yaris 1.0. But £300 with a 3 month warranty makes used sense.

No-one spends £90 on a front ABS sensor when you can buy a pattern one from Germany for £36.

No-one spends £90 on new front discs from Toyota when new pattern ones are £40.

No-one spends £200 on anew engine mountings when £35 buys a perfectly good s/h one.

And only a fool buys a car which is not galvanised nowadays without wasoilling or other derust treatment if he/she wants to keep it for years.

And no-one spends £70 on a new tyre for running around town when £40 buys a budget one.

And so on..



Edited by madf on 16/02/2010 at 15:14

When does a car "wear out"? - corax
And only a fool buys a car which is not galvanised nowadays without waxoiling or other derust treatment if he/she wants to keep it for years.


Unless you buy a Volvo which seem to be virtually immune to rust and the earlier ones are not galvanised. Not sure if the newer ones are either.

The BMW 5 series and I think the 7 series are part galvanised which explains why you see so many early ones in good condition bodily.

When does a car "wear out"? - Andrew-T
A car is worn out a period of time after it dips below £1000 in value.


Why? If the Proton you mention is not going to cost that £1000 for another 3 years, does that mean you get rid now? That makes no sense at all. If you calculate that the £1000 is needed for the next MoT, that is a different matter.

It's the same old arbitrary argument about dumping a working car as soon as it looks like being worth 3 figures instead of 4. If it costs nothing to maintain for a year, the only reasons to get rid are boredom, apparent loss of status, or maybe discomfort.
When does a car "wear out"? - daveyjp
Once the tin worm sets in on major structural components it is time to say goodbye, unless you want a project.

A friend keeps his almost worthless N reg Escort going - may cost him a few hundred quid every year to keep running, but it's not rotting yet and it serves him well. It went to Italy and back last year!

Edited by daveyjp on 16/02/2010 at 15:36

When does a car "wear out"? - primeradriver
>> A car is worn out a period of time after it dips below £1000
in value.
Why? If the Proton you mention is not going to cost that £1000 for another
3 years does that mean you get rid now? That makes no sense at all.

It's the same old arbitrary argument about dumping a working car as soon as it
looks like being worth 3 figures instead of 4.


I am only stating that that is what most people think, and because that's what most people think, so it follows that that's how most cars wear out. It's a self-fulfilling prophecy. I certainly don't live by it, I'm saying others do.

Not all of us follow the rule, least of all me. I, only last year spent £230 on changing a cambelt on an old Daewoo that passed the grand mark a very long time ago indeed.

I take advantage of this old chestnut (and it is same old same old, I agree with you). I deliberately buy as second cars, cars whose value sinks like a stone but has been looked after well, because it's a great way of short-circuiting the theory.

We were given the Daewoo by my old Grandad 7 years ago. It was probably worth about £600 then. Perversely, if you look on the Trader they're still selling for about £600. It's not given any trouble to speak of. It'll probably run another 2 or 3 years at least before it's a wreck. I'm happy with it.
When does a car "wear out"? - idle_chatterer
My view which might be controversial as I see a lot of back roomers proudly running cars to stellar mileages is that modern cars deteriorate badly at around 70K miles, I don't like shiny steering wheels or gear levers, hate rattles and dull paint so I (given the choice) change well before this point.

My (admittedlyl not so recent) experience is of big bills after 70K miles e.g. aircon failures, oil seals, cambelts, brake disks, exhausts etc Mostly things which others might be happy to drive their cars without - but not me. Cars of this mileage tend to be cheap (for a reason), you pay your money and make your choice.
When does a car "wear out"? - mss1tw
I defy anyone not to love the feeling of slinging some old heap into a space, walking away leaving the door ajar while you get a coffee, and not looking back to see if anyone's parked too close.

Therapeutic...
When does a car "wear out"? - SpamCan61 {P}
I defy anyone not to love the feeling of slinging some old heap into a
space walking away leaving the door ajar while you get a coffee and not looking
back to see if anyone's parked too close.
Therapeutic...

Yeah, I know what you mean, I don't leave my lovely blue Vectra unlocked, but it's nice not to have a panic attack when I leave it in the door dingers' section of the Asda car park, or when I scrape the nearside down a hedge on a narrow New Forest lane. The aircon still works, all the CDX toys still work, it goes fine, just getting a bit clonky in the suspension dept.
When does a car "wear out"? - Andrew-T
It follows that that's how most cars wear out.


Sorry, p-d. I thought you were using the words literally. For me a car (or any other thing) is 'worn out' when it is kaputt, knackered, not reasonably repairable. By reasonably I don't mean that you don't wish to fork out, just that so many parts are becoming time-expired it's not worth the hassle. And I think that may be what the OP meant.

Spending more to change to a newer vehicle than it would cost to fix the old one is always an option, whether it is worn out or not.
When does a car "wear out"? - b308
For me a car (or
any other thing) is 'worn out' when it is kaputt knackered not reasonably repairable.


Same for me as well... and thats why I don't think that you can put a figure on it like someone did earlier... I have a 15 year old car outside and it has plenty of life still left in it... and its worth far less than a grand!

Going back to the OP, I'd have thought that you could keep that Golf for many miles yet... better the devil you know, and all that!
When does a car "wear out"? - L'escargot
The average lifespan of a car in the UK is 14 years. tinyurl.com/ylk24ur

"the life of most British cars comes to an end at around 13 to 17 years .......... an average lifespan of ........ about 14 years."

Edited by L'escargot on 17/02/2010 at 06:36

When does a car "wear out"? - Cliff Pope
The same car in a different cultural environment will have a different lifespan - eg Sweden, Africa, Cuba. So it's got very little to do with material properties and everything to do with money.
When does a car "wear out"? - primeradriver
Exactly. Ironically, if you take the world view the longest-lasting models overall will probably be the Ladas, Hyundais and Suzukis of this world as they are sold in vast numbers to people who eek every last scrap of value out of them.

Mainly because, say, an Indian family might only be able to afford a new car once every 20 years.
When does a car "wear out"? - Rattle
I think our strict (compared to some countries) MOT system also dosn't help. It is the same in Japan I bet it is very rarer to find any car over ten years old there.
When does a car "wear out"? - primeradriver
Our MOT is slack compared with Japan's Shaken, but yes ours is still relatively strict compared with much of the rest of the world.

In Japan I found that there were very few cars older than three or four that I could see, never mind ten. I also didn't see any cars with "bad" smoke coming out of the exhaust, no cars with battered bits of trim, and no cars that weren't almost completely silent at idle (no diesels of course, but also you could tell that they were spectacularly well maintained compared with the rattly old sheds you get here).

Old Ford Enduras need not apply ;)
When does a car "wear out"? - Rattle
I like the old Enduras very simple little engines that last a hell of a long time providing you keep up with the oil changes.

I know what you mean though, I actually think the MOT is not strict enough. I think the police also need to do more to educate drivers over faults rather than giving points all the time for a defective tyre or brake light out.

The problem in this country is that too many people know how to play the MOT game a neighbours car failed on a minor rear seat belt fault . The solution was to remove the seat belt and it passed.

When does a car "wear out"? - primeradriver
Was just referring to the Endura's propensity to chatter ;)

I think the MOT has become too obsessed with emissions (not that I have ever fallen foul). I've had cars where I wasn't happy with brake performance, put in for testing after purchase from auction but the car passed the test and I had to demand that the garage fix the discs/pads etc.

Still better than the US though where there is no MOT equivalent in some states and cars go around with the wrong type of windscreen stuck to the car with gaffer tape. I guess the owners are waiting for it to come off so they can sue the manufacturer and force a recall!
When does a car "wear out"? - Rattle
The Top Gear America eposide is a good example, if you look how faulty some of their cars were. If I don't end up going for scrappage I have a good mind to just get an MOT for my car and flog it at auction!

Nice ten year old Corsa, in as new condition complete with the piece of mind of a 12 month MOT. That is the big danger of the MOT, too many people think because the car has an MOT it is

a) Safe
2) Nothing wrong with it especialy if it is 12 months.

My dads car passed the MOT in August. In early september it needed two new CV joints, two new wishbones and some bushes. The car was barely drivable but it still passed the MOT, I think it just got an advisory for the bushes. To this date its only the second car my dad has ever had to pass the MOT, the other was four years old. This was was 12 years old at time and it had done 12,000 miles since the last one.

It is the perfect example of a very worn out car but it will pass the MOT tomorrow probably.

I think it can also probably be argued in the case of my friend if a car has had no money spent on it for 30,000 miles then it will be very worn even if it just needs new pads, discs, tryres, shocks etc.


When does a car "wear out"? - primeradriver
Agree totally Rattle, especially the last paragraph.

No replacement for paranoia when it comes to cars. The paranoid owner who notices mild changes in handling and gets them sorted quickly will always beat the MOT+service once a year boys.

People who spend thousands on a car then won't spend hundreds maintaining it baffle me. I work the other way around.
When does a car "wear out"? - Cliff Pope
People who spend thousands on a car then won't spend hundreds maintaining it baffle me.
I work the other way around.



? You mean you buy a car for hundreds and then spend thousands maintaining it?
When does a car "wear out"? - primeradriver
Depends on how long you measure it over ;)

Yes, I am sure there have been cars I've owned where I've spent much more on maintenance over several years than the car cost.
 

Value my car