Buying a high mileage car - advice required - Pullers
Hi All,

Im new to this forum so hope this is the right place!

Im wanting to sell my focus 1.6 tdci and buy something larger, more comftable and with a bit more get up and go.
I have seen 4 cars that I am interesed in but am unsure which would be best, They all have motorway miles which is another thing that does worry me slightly, although I have driven some high mile stuff at work ive never had one personally.

BMW 330d estate (manual) - New shape with leather done 102,000 - Full BMW history
BMW 520d estate (auto) - New Shape with leather and sat nav etc done 105,000 - Full BMW History
Volvo V70 D5 (auto) - Circa 100k - with Full Volvo History
Audi Allroad - Circa (auto) 100k - Full Audi History.

All these are between 9000 and 11700 pounds.

Would these be ok with continued mileage I do between 16k to 20k a year.

All advice, help etc with which is best and probs woould be appreciated.

Regards

Pullers


Edited by rtj70 on 05/02/2010 at 12:09

Buying a high mileage car - advice required - movilogo
The prices seem bit on higher side considering the mileage (even with FSH).

Since the mileage you do is quite high, after adding that in already high mileage cars, will bring their odo reading so high 2-yr down the line, you may get very poor resale value while it comes to sell.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - adam f
In my opinion you will lose a lot of money when you come to sell. If you was to sell in say 2/3 years time they will all have around 140k on them and people wont be interested in paying lots of money.

Also i would have thought some high maintenance bills will come your way due to the mileage - i think the cars will cost you a lot in the long run and also you will lose a lot when you come to sell.

Assuming your budget is £12k - there are a lot of cars out there with a lot less mileage and probably the same comfort factor that you could buy.

Edit: We was obviously writing our replies at the same time!

Edited by adam f on 05/02/2010 at 12:19

Buying a high mileage car - advice required - movilogo
writing our replies at the same time!


Great Minds Think Alike ;)
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - ijws15
Of the four my preference would be the Volvo, Audi last.

My money - would be something less prestigious and with fewer miles for the same mony. But if you can afford the repair bills . . . .
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - Alanovich
These are horrendous mileage for the budget - I'd steer well clear unless you're intending to try to get another 150k out of them yourself. Which could prove very, very expensive to achieve.

Seeing as I recently saw some pre-reg (59) Subaru Legacies with delivery mileage for around 13k, the cars you list are madness in comaprison.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - Gromit {P}
Welcome to the backroom, Pullers. My own recent experience with buying a high-miler might help you.

100K isn't high mileage, its just perceived to be high by the buying public. But as wisely pointed out, expect a big repair bill before 150K (expect the worst, hope for the best, and you won't go too far wrong). So budget accordingly. Perfer cars with proven mechanicals and few new gadgets on them to go wrong. And reckon on running it to the scrapyard.

These four all look like good candidates, but pricey. Personally I'd avoid the Audi unless you need 4wd - more to go wrong. If you do need 4wd, a Legacy as mentioned above would be a good bet.

Some background: My purchase is a '99 Subaru Forester with 171,000 miles on the clock. Trade sale, one owner from new, service book showing full Subaru history from new.

No reason to doubt the history. There was a note handwritten in chinagraph pen on timing belt cover agreed with last noted TB change in history. Windscreen sticker with date of next service due corresponded to last noted service on history. Suspension clonky but otherwise drove OK.

Bought for ?1600 but spent another ?850 to get it through the NCT (Irish MOT equivalent, taken every 2 years). Similar age with 130,000 (ish) miles would typically cost ?3-3.5K.

My logic was the mileage was high enough that I'd no cause to suspect it wasn't genuine, the car appeared to have worked for a living but not to have been neglected, and that for 2 1/2 grand I could afford to run it for two years and then scrap it.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - oldnotbold
Gromit - and if/when you scrap the Forester, bear in mind that the engines fetch good money from people putting them into other makes. VW Type 3 campers, for example (the boxy 80s ones).
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - Niallster
High mileage vehicles. Don't unless really cheap and these don't seem very cheap to me.

I would focus on two issues.

1. Motorway miles. People seem to regard these as if these were some sort of magic free miles. They are not. UK motorways have potholes and some are more like car parks than roads. The only real benefit is that the engine is up to temperature and hence will receive less wear. However it is not just the engine thats doing the miles its the whole car and if I had to replace anything on a modern car it would be the engine.

2. Resales. As said above nearly all punters cut off at 100K. A car any car is virtually unsaleable at say 150K. So unless you intend to run these vehicles in to the ground and scrap it then the whole life cost of the vehicle will be huge.

The market works and huge mileage vehicles are unpopular for good reason.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - DP
2. Resales. As said above nearly all punters cut off at 100K. A car any
car is virtually unsaleable at say 150K. So unless you intend to run these vehicles
in to the ground and scrap it then the whole life cost of the vehicle
will be huge.


I would disagree with that. I recently sold my 153,000 mile Volvo S60 in 4 days. Plenty of calls, first guy who turned up bought it.

Mileage is too simplistic on its own to judge the soundness (or otherwise) of a car. Most modern cars, if well maintained, drive very well at 100,000 miles, the better ones still do at 150,000 miles. A 150,000 mile car which has had new shocks and the suspension rebushed will handle and ride better than an 80,000 miler which hasn't.

And despite owning scores of cars with 100-200k on the clock, it is a fact that none have given me a bill anything like the one I got when the clutch exploded on my 60,000 mile Renault Scenic diesel.

Buying a high mileage car - advice required - Gromit {P}
Thanks, ONB, I didn't know that!
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - Felix
I follow the logic of high mileage being a bad idea, if it's big and comfortable you're after I see that the new Skoda Superb starts on Autotrader at 12k. they don't come bigger or more comforfortable than that. Not an estate like your choices but hatchback so might still fit the bill. Not sure the 1.9 PD would qualify as "get up and go" but I see you can get into the 2.0 140 PD from about 13k which wouldn't be too bad.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - barney100
Can only comment on the Volvo. They are capable of very high mileages but check it starts from cold easily and from personal experience check the pads and discs.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - Brian Tryzers
>Motorway miles. People seem to regard these as if these were some sort of magic free miles ... The only real benefit is that the engine is up to temperature and hence will receive less wear.

Hardly. The clutch, the brakes and the lower ratios of the gearbox get very little to do at motorway speed, and not only is the engine fully warmed up - which also benefits the exhaust and emissions systems - but it's generally operating in a low-stress state, well within its capabilities. Similarly, the car has proportionally fewer starts, so the battery is less stressed too. And, while there may be the occasional pothole on a motorway, on my 85-mile regular run I reckon I see about as many as I would on a 3-mile trip into town.

My 103,000-mile Volvo is showing signs of wear, but only where I touch it - steering wheel, pedal rubbers (although not the brake pedal), upholstery on the driver's seat. The bits you can't see - battery, clutch, exhaust, and (really!) all the brake discs and pads - are the ones it came with from the factory in 2002. I'm happy to attribute that to its mainly-motorway life. I don't think anyone would give me £9,000 for it, though. }:---)
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - rtj70
Im wanting to sell my focus 1.6 tdci and buy something larger, more comftable and with a >> bit more get up and go


Mondeo TDCi ;-) or similar. Bigger and more powerful engine and comfortable. Surprised nobody else said this. It would for the money have a lot lower mileage.

Buying a high mileage diesel, I'd be scared someone had once put petrol in it at some point.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - Brian Tryzers
>Buying a high mileage diesel, I'd be scared someone had once put petrol in it at some point.

I'd be more scared of that in a low-mileage one that had been someone's first diesel car. High-milers have been using diesel for years and generally know which pump to take it from.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - movilogo
If motorway miles are mentioned, ask the seller which motorway he's talking about.

If M25, then equate that to numerous short stop-start town journeys :)
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - Brian Tryzers
Yes, but you can't rack up 100,000 miles doing that, can you? The OP doesn't say how old these cars are, but 100,000 miles at M25-crawl speed would take 5,000 hours. You could do that in seven months, but only without getting out of the car.

Edited by WillDeBeest on 05/02/2010 at 13:55

Buying a high mileage car - advice required - jbif
Hardly. The clutch, the brakes ... .... .... .... for it, though. }:---) >>


WillBeBeest:

;-) Rubbish. *

* (not really, as I agree with everything you said. But I don't want people to find out how wrong the general public is in their perception of high mileage cars. As long as they run a hundred thousand miles away from them, I am happy as it means there is a bargain to be bought by me and my friends in the know).

Edited by jbif on 05/02/2010 at 14:10

Buying a high mileage car - advice required - WorkshopTech
this is a hard one to advise because you are paying a substantial sum for high mileage prestige.
We service/repair and sell s/h some of the brands you mention. A few pointers:

1. The general public have an aversion to high mileage cars, so there is a substantial price step at 100k+. If you are putting 20k a year on these then expect significant depreciation given that you are starting from a 100k. A lot of the trade wont want your car at all in 3 years time.
2. Although it is true that the main mechanical components will be fine, its the ancilliaries that we find we are replacing. Alternators, steering pumps/racks, shocks, turbos, MAFs, DMFs. Relatively few DMFs last longer than 150k. Seats can also suffer, depending on how the car was used. Cars really do wear out and at 100k most are half-way thourhg the most optimistic working life. At 150k the car is three quarters worn out, even the average BMW. I am talking economic repairs here, with labour etc. I know a lot last for more than 200k, but Im working on the average.
3. A lot of estates are working cars, even prestifgge brands, so look for signes of wear and towbar (removed)?

If it were my money and I depended as much on the car as you obvuiously do then I'd look for something less prestige with lower miles, possibly still with factory warranty on it. I think it would be less risky and cheaper overall. Octy II estate springs to mind, possibly with DSG (although not my favourite transmission) or maybe the Subaru as mentioned earlier.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - movilogo
You can get Hyundai Sonata or Kia Magentis with 3-yr warranty remaining for half of that money!

They are luxurious though not a prestige band and driving dynamics are not per with BMW etc.


Buying a high mileage car - advice required - WorkshopTech
Good point. We now look after a couple of Magentis that are being used as airport cars. Already high mileage but all good so far. They are apparently the standard taxi now in some far eastern places like Singapore (have replaced Toyota Crowns). The are comfortable, plenty of toys and fine for M-way cruising.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - Brian Tryzers
Don't remember seeing Kia taxis in Singapore but there are certainly Hyundais; still plenty of Crowns too, mind. But then, Singapore has an 80 km/h speed limit and permit rules that restrict the number of cars on the roads, so there are no high speeds there and surprisingly few traffic jams to shorten a car's life.

Incidentally, I should probably clarify my comments earlier. I think my 100,000-mile car still has plenty of life in it, which is why I'm not replacing it - yet; I certainly wouldn't think of buying anything that old for the use I put it to. I'm confident in mine because I've had it since new, but 20,000 miles a year must mean you depend on your car, so it seems unwise to take a punt on an old one you haven't known for years.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - WorkshopTech
Don't remember seeing Kia taxis in Singapore but there are certainly Hyundais;


Yes, they are Sonatas, CRDi, but basically the same car as the Magentis diesel.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - rtj70
but 20,000 miles a year must mean you depend on your car, so it seems unwise to take a
punt on an old one you haven't known for years.


I think this is good advice. If you do low mileage then an older high mileage car will be fine unless you're unlucky with repair bills etc. If you depend on it for a 20k miles pa then I'd personally go for something newer and lower mileage.

Unless you've set your heart on it having to be a BMW, Volvo, Audi... but you'd get a better value Skoda Octavia or even a VW Passat in your budget. Or I would have thought. You probably could get an Octavia vRS 2.0T with less than 40k miles within your budget.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - bell boy
i think WT has the answer and he doesnt like blue smarties (alledgedly)
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - M.M
Another to support WT for summing it up correctly. Would be interesting to know the ages of these vehicles and if they are main dealer... I guess not at those mileages.

Over the years we've taken advantage of low priced high mileage cars running many from 100K onto 150K.. even a couple over 225K... I've no fear of them as such.

However things are changing and as WT says it is not the body or main running gear that will let you down but you're starting off at 100K with a good bit of wear on turbo, clutch/dmf, aircon system, bearings, bushes, alternator, elec motors/switches etc.

If you are prepared to go up to 12K have a look at the makers used car locators on their websites. You could do a lot worse than a Skoda Octavia, Ford Mondeo or Citroen C5 (my own left field choice) which you'd get just run in at up to 15,000mls and max 18mth old for that money. You'd be sure of the vehicle history and get a good warranty.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - LikedDrivingOnce
You probably could get an Octavia vRS 2.0T with less
than 40k miles within your budget.

Good shout, rtj70.

Autotrader have an Octavia vRS 2.0T Estate for 10,995 with only 27k miles. Just one example of several.

Buying a high mileage car - advice required - SpamCan61 {P}
Hardly. The clutch the brakes and the lower ratios of the gearbox get very little
to do at motorway speed and not only is the engine fully warmed up -
which also benefits the exhaust and emissions systems - but it's generally operating in a
low-stress state well within its capabilities.


Agreed, my 30K a year bangernomics Vauxhalls usually do 60K+ on a set of brake pads, and I've never had an exhaust rot through. Suspension wear is the main issue IMHO .. and I've never had to change a clutch even at 170K+.

Edited by SpamCan61 {P} on 05/02/2010 at 18:46

Buying a high mileage car - advice required - bbroomlea{P}
I bought my Audi A4 at 4 years old 3 1/2 years ago with 112,000 on the clock. It has now done 170,000 miles and so far so good. Nothing has really gone wrong and continues to be reliable (touching wood!)

Before the A4, I had a Rover 75 that I bought at similar miles and sold on at just over 225,000 miles. Again, nothing other than regular servicing in many 1000'a of miles that I covered.

Buying a high mileage car - advice required - SpamCan61 {P}
Yeah, the issue here is that the OP is proposing to buy a car with bangernomics mileage but at 10 times bangernomics price!
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - CJay{P}
The OP is suggesting to buy cars around 3 years old - that is why they are that expensive.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - Brian Tryzers
>I bought my Audi A4 at 4 years old 3 1/2 years ago with 112,000 on the clock. It has now done 170,000 miles and so far so good.

But you didn't pay £9,000 for it - did you?
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - bbroomlea{P}
>>But you didn't pay £9,000 for it - did you?

I didnt but the point I was trying to make is that buying a car with 100K on it doesnt mean its on its last legs. I got my A4 cheap enough to take the risk but I have also realised that these kind of cars go on and on and on without much attention needed.

Whether the reputation of reliability is strong enough to command such high prices for a second hand car with over 100K could be debated for a long time, but my experience would say they are more than capable of doing 20K a year for a few years and there will be someone prepared to pay good money when you want to get rid.

Despite the mileage on my A4 and that it is now not far off 8 years old, I was still offered £2.5K trade in on something newer and ebay/autotrader prices for similar mileage/age cars are around £1-£1.5K highter than that. As long as there are no large bills its cheap motoring really
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - Hugo {P}
The prices that th OP has been quoted should be regarded as VA - That is Vendor Aspirational.

IE they are NEGOTIABLE.

Lets say he decides that he likes the Volvo. I would work out what the car is worth TO HIM, then deduct 10% then make an offer.

If the offer is rejected, there will be others. Simple as that.

If the buyer wants to negotiate then there is hope.

As has been sad, there is a major public misconception about high mileage vehicles. But some people's driving profile will accomodate the saving to be made from a high mileage vehicle.

For example, that 03 Discovery TD5 I've just bought with 109k on the clock came in at a massive saving compared to one with 'average' mileage, yet I will get the same use out of it and probably pay the same money to run it as one at 70k costing almost twice as much. Why, because we will probably do 5k a year in it for the next 8 years and it will have a mileage of 150k. By then it won't matter a hoot what its mileage is as it will be worth peanuts.

Why did I buy this particular one? Because it was cheap and more importantly, it is clean has been regularly maintained.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - Pullers
Hi All,

Firstly Thankyou so much to all of you for your input - some good advice in there, and sorry for my late reply!
The cars are around 2005 reg and although previously looking at these makes and models at various dealers found these nice looking examples on a web site at carl reeves trading in Lincoln (Take a look.....).

I must admit I hadnt even thought about a Subaru Legacy etc.

Im over 6ft and yes do a fair few miles hence the comfort needed and have promised the wife I will keep this one a bit longer then 18months this time! Partly why I was looking at the prestiege badges with plenty of toys etc.

Thanks again Guys!



Buying a high mileage car - advice required - SpamCan61 {P}
The OP is suggesting to buy cars around 3 years old - that is why
they are that expensive.


I do realise that :-). the financial model doesn't look so good though when applied to 10 grand cars that'll have 160K+ on them in a couple of years.
Buying a high mileage car - advice required - M.M
Pullers. I think most folks positive experience about high mileage cars, as is ours, does seem to be at the lower end of the price scale. Often at £2 -3k and rarely above £4k.

Moving up from a Focus your needs at your price would seem to be easily met by new shape Mondeo, C5, Legacy, Octavia, Volvo etc .... delivery mileage, ex-demo or up to 18mths old with a max of 15k with a solid main dealer prep/warranty. You'll get all the toys too with many of these makes if the right model is chosen.

Just a comment on the type of dealer you mention. Do you really want to spend in the region of £12k with a guy out in the wilds who pictures all his cars on a Fen track and is only available by appointment?? This guy might be the most honest seller in the world but such setups can make it very hard to chase down any warranty isues.

Edited by M.M on 07/02/2010 at 13:01

 

Value my car