Is that police car behind in a hurry? - ifithelps
Saw a Merc estate police car with all lights and sirens blaring attempt to barge its way down the A1(M) in North Yorks this evening.

I happened to spot it in my rear view mirror and pulled over, but several drivers did not.

It took an age to get a motorhome to pull to the nearside.

The police car was swerving from side to side in a vain attempt to get the motorhome driver to realise what was behind him.

I couldn't hear the siren when the polis was behind me.

If you're driving a motorhome and can't see much in your rear view mirror, how do you know a police car - sirens/lights or not - is there?

I've some sympathy for the motorhome driver.

I wonder if the police driver would agree?



Is that police car behind in a hurry? - gordonbennet
I've always thought these ghastly American style (oxymoron?) sirens are completely useless.

Can't hear them above the radio, in town you can't tell if they're approaching or , departing, can't judge a distance on them, the echoes from buildings confuse the sounds even more.

The old two tones, you could do all of the above.

Bells were better still :)


I would like to be a fly on the wall in a police car responding, should imagine some choice descriptions of the observation and awareness of many drivers.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Cymrogwyllt
one of the things I was taught when learning to drive buses was to use the mirrors on bends etc to get a mental picture of what's behind. It's easy to do and very valuable especially when having to reverse due to blind drivers not looking ahead
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - MikeTorque
Just goes to show how many don't use their mirrors enough these days. If they have their radio/CD on as well it's little wonder they don't hear the sirens either.

Ambulances and the fire service suffer similarly to the police when on an emergency call. Maybe it's time they started to use targeted sound penetration technology to move the slow compliances out of the way.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Westpig
anything much more than 50-60 mph the siren(s) are useless.... and I don't think louder ones are the way to go, as the ones we have now are deafening at slow speeds

decent bright strobe lights, alternate headlamp flashing and the 'encouragement of Joe public to actually use a mirror

buses and most lorries are usually fairly good to notice you. White van man is usually dreadful....some mimsing car drivers are equally as bad.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - bathtub tom
>>White van man is usually dreadful

I protest!

I saw the flashing blues behind me in a very slow moving queue of traffic this afternoon, and pulled in. Two vehicles subsequently pulled round me.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - midlifecrisis
Van drivers are absolutely awful at responding (most car drivers aren't far behind).

One thing you can guarantee is that in lane 3 of a motorway at 80-90mph, when they do eventually see you, they will hit the brakes rather than move into lane 2. If there are any 'flies on the wall' in the car, they'd certainly have to cover their ears.

Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Westpig
I saw the flashing blues behind me in a very slow moving queue of traffic
this afternoon and pulled in. Two vehicles subsequently pulled round me.


i did say 'usually' not 'always'......:-)
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Oilyman
I have yet to be caught out like this, but let's say I'm doing a 'shade' over 70 mph on the motorway, overtaking some slower traffic in lanes 1 and 2 - what would you boys in blue think to me doing 95 plus to get out of your way and into lane 2 in a safe gap to let you pass?

I've been there before and had what I took for a 'thanks' - raised palm from the co-driver in a hurried looking Senator - on the M6 some years ago.

Anyone else?

Edited by Oilyman on 13/06/2008 at 22:42

Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Westpig
Oilyman,

Depends. 80 mph or less they won't be after you unless you're really unlucky (car fits suspect description for something or similar) or have something wrong with the car, so a quick blip upwards and an early indicator left and you're laughing...

80-85 they're probably not after you, but could be, which leave you with a dilemma,, because speeding up could leave them thinking you're extracting the urine..however, probably not after you, so a judgement call

85 plus, wouldn't risk it uness it's glaringly obvious they're on a mission i.e bearing down on you at mega speed, as you might well be the target and speeding up will compound it and may well provide more evidence

Is that police car behind in a hurry? - mss1tw
If I was in that situation I would put the indicator on to let them know I had seen them and was responding and floor it.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Lud
I got in the way of a hurrying plod car the other day and awarded myself a slap on the wrist. I don't usually.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Oilyman
Westpig:
I appreciate the answer - nice to know it's got a bit of flexibility in it, within reason.

I never thought of / saw / heard about the left indicator - but it makes sense really.

Re the bearing down at mega speed - once experienced an Omega on the M40 at around 10:30 pm 'howling' past - lights and sirens on in lane 3 whilst I'm in lane 1 - (empty m'way) - damn sure it felt like a shockwave as it passed me, not sure I'd like to estimate his speed - but impressive all the same.

Edited by Oilyman on 13/06/2008 at 23:54

Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Westpig
I think i need to add that the advice is merely that, advice...if you get Constable Savage on a day he's found out his missus is 'over the side' then you're not going to get the same leeway, are you?.....:-)
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Oilyman
Taken.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Hamsafar
In 17 years of driving I have never missed an emergency vehicle in my mirrors. People aren't checking them often enough if they don't have all round observation and a mental picture of what's around them at all times. If you are checking them often enough, it is much easier anyway as you are only looking for changes/updates to your mental picture rather than repeatedly forming one from scratch ... and it is soon second nature.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Lud
if you get
Constable Savage on a day he's found out his missus is 'over the side' then
you're not going to get the same leeway are you?.....:-)


Oh I dunno Westpig. After all you might be a winsome young woman with the sense to flutter your eyelashes a bit and look sheepish, or lambish or whatever...

:o}
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - fox83
i have dealt with police for minor things before and always found that a showing as much cleavage as you can get away with helps. wrong i know but it hasnt let me down yet.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Lud
Thank you fox. See what I mean?
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - welshlad
sorry but in my day more cleavage got you the full extent of the law and no leeway at all..........i always used the 'if she wouldnt do that for me if i wasnt in uniform and writing a ticket it dont matter now' method........used to love seeing the dissappointed faces
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Lud
I don't want to seem argumentative welshlad, but I always understood the art of that sort of thing was to make the victim think the uniform had nothing to do with anything, it's just his big rotating bloodshot eyes she fancies.

Of course you don't have to listen to me. I'm sure you were never swayed by an artful accidental display of this or that. Stern, that's what you were.


:o}
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - welshlad
i dont like stern.......i prefer firm but fair.......i always started out with the same question 'do you know why you've been stopped' if they answered yes and could tell me why then they got it both barrels for driving knowing there was a problem if they said they didnt then they got it both barrels for not being attentive to their vehicle, like i said firm but fair :-))
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Westpig
female drink drivers just out of night clubs are the real eye openers...

the lights in the custody area are painfully bright... it's amazing how many officers feel the need to 'pop in' to custody all of a sudden, the word goes around like a wild fire

Is that police car behind in a hurry? - fox83
because of my job i have regular contact with the police, usually daily, i have to say i have found three things that never fail to tempt the officers. cleavage. cups of tea and chocolate.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - ifithelps
things that never fail to tempt the officers - cleavage...>>


Sorry if this is a bit crude, but I like examples of 'copperspeak'.

I once heard a polis criticise another for showing too much interest in the ladies.

The disparaging term he used was 'fanny rat'.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Lud
Although even a dedicated copper can be forgiven a bashful, blushing, quick sideways glance at a lady's bosom, fox, I feel you may be slandering the force (as it used to be called) with the allegation about cups of tea and chocolate. While commonplace in the security services of less fortunate countries, depravity of that order is still rare here, surely?
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - fox83
i can only advise of my personal observations of police officers. the ones round here are lovely, but like i say they do seem to love cleavage, tea and chocolate, if thats all it takes for me to have their help and presence reguarly than that seems like a fair deal to me.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - midlifecrisis
I'm a salad freak at work, so offers of chocolate and tea wouldn't cut much ice with me. Now what was the other thing........:)

I once arrested a very (very) nice young lady, driving a BMW M3 convertible. Cleavage in abundance. She decided to overtake us in our fully marked Police car at a rate of knots. Subsequently found to be over the limit.

On the way back, she lent forward, put her arm around the seat and wondered aloud if there was anything she could do that might divert us away from the station. I looked at my mate, who looked at me. A raise of eyebrows, but she was taken to the nick all the same.

Having said that, all the last sparsely dressed female I had in the car could say was "You're going bald"

Edited by midlifecrisis on 14/06/2008 at 18:05

Is that police car behind in a hurry? - fox83
You say 'going bald' as if its a bad thing.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Lud
Having said that all the last sparsely dressed female I had in the car could
say was "You're going bald"


Yeah, my missus is given to saying things like that out of the blue too...
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Alby Back
Sort of thing which could deserve a Churchillian response. Along the lines of " I may be going bald, you however, have always been..........." ( whatever it is she has always been I suppose )

Edited by Shoespy on 14/06/2008 at 18:41

Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Martin Devon
i have dealt with police for minor things before and always found that a showing
as much cleavage as you can get away with helps. wrong i know but it
hasnt let me down yet.

It will eventually!!

MD
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - bathtub tom
>>i did say 'usually' not 'always'......:-)

Is 'tarred with the same brush' unacceptable?

We try our best, but when you're up to your RRRRRs in alligators, it's difficult to remember the original intention was to drain the swamp ;>)
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - jc2
When I was taught to drive a HGV(more years ago than I like to remember),I was told to check all my mirrors-both sides (and the centre one if you had a float behind and a cab back-window) at least every eight seconds.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - menu du jour
A few years ago 3 fire engines all with lights, sirens and going "at speed" came past my house early evening, hardly any traffic etc. No more than 100 yards ahead a small car pulled out of a side turning and proceeded up the road nice and slowly with these 3 engines now in a tight bunch right behind him! He seemed quite unaware.
screwtape
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Leif
Yes some drivers are as thick as [snip]. I am amazed at how unobservant some drivers can be, and it is worrying. I've seen marked police cars hurtling down lane 3 of a motorway, metres behind another car, clearly waiting for that car to get out of the way so that they can make more rapid progress.

We had a VW camper van when I was a kid. Brilliant!
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Optimist
I think I'll just introduce a bit of reality.

When I look at the telly it seems to me that all the sirens, blues, twos and wig-wags are often being used so coppers can chase after some elderly teenager who could just as easily be left alone and picked up later with less fuss and risk to all concerned.

Is that police car behind in a hurry? - midlifecrisis
Nothing like an expert......and you're nothing like an expert!!
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Optimist
Oh dear. I am sowwy. Is oo offended?

Are there any other jobs above criticism apart from your own?

Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Westpig
Optimist,

Constructive criticism or advice never hurt anybody....and we can all learn can't we.

But... you've admitted taking your thoughts from a highly edited t.v. programme and then made a big presumption to go with it, without knowledge of any facts.

how helpful or constructive is that?
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - fox83
i may be guilty of having a negative attitude to the police. however my attitude to officers has changed recently. I was joking with several officers recently about what a cushy job they have eating biscuits, drinking tea all day etc. they dragged me out, busy friday night as a civilian observer. never again. i couldnt do the job and quite frankly wouldnt. it isnt anything like the crap on the tv. a real eyeopener.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - midlifecrisis
Oh dear. I am sowwy. Is oo offended?
Are there any other jobs above criticism apart from your own?


As well as being no expert on the Police, you clearly don't have a sense of humour either!!
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Ben 10
Just out of interest. MLC and WP. Are you both serving officers or retired?
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Westpig
Just out of interest. MLC and WP. Are you both serving officers or retired?

serving.... but the light at the end of the tunnel is getting fairly bright

Edited by Westpig on 17/06/2008 at 00:23

Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Ben 10
Westpig,

I know its off the point, and I'm being a bit personal; I understand you retire after 30 yrs. If you joined at 18.5, do you have to do 31.5 years?
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Westpig
I know its off the point and I'm being a bit personal; I understand you retire after 30 yrs. If you joined at 18.5 do you have to do 31.5 years?


no, 30 yrs is 30 yrs.

not many people could ever join at 18.5 though, as the procedures for getting in are laborious and slow and can take a year or more, if not longer. Certainly nowadays they prefer more mature recruits i.e. people that have done a few other things in life first.

The only sure fire way of doing it was to join the police cadets first and then you joined automatically when you were 18.5 yrs old, but that's all in the past now because the police cadet system was phased out donkey's years ago on cost grounds
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Ben 10
Thanks for that. I wanted to know the comparison with the system we have.
I joined the fire service at 18. Most do the 30 yrs, but as its 30 yrs or age 50 I have to do 32 years. Seeing as we have relatively same pension, I would love to go at 48. Never mind, only 5 years left!

Edited by scribe on 18/06/2008 at 23:10

Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Martin Devon
not many people could ever join at 18.5 though as the procedures for getting in
are laborious and slow and can take a year or more if not longer. Certainly
nowadays they prefer more mature recruits i.e. people that have done a few other things
in life first.
The only sure fire way of doing it was to join the police cadets first
and then you joined automatically when you were 18.5 yrs old but that's all in
the past now because the police cadet system was phased out donkey's years ago on
cost grounds

Not so if you are from an ethnic minority background. Not many moons ago a friend of a young retired officer contacted Avon and Somerset to ask about recruitment and forms etc and was told that there was currently (then) no recruiting. The same day another friend who was from an ethnic background pulled the same stunt and was welcomed with open arms. It may be subject to matters legal. Also a few years ago the Met was fast tracking certain applicants. This was public knowledge unfortunately. Sad old world really.

MD
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - deepwith
Westpig, is it a fallacy that you can ease your way in after a year as a 'Special'?

Edited by deepwith on 22/06/2008 at 12:27

Is that police car behind in a hurry? - midlifecrisis
Westpig is it a fallacy that you can ease your way in after a year
as a 'Special'?


Being a Special doesn't give you any advantages. You go through the same recruitment process. If anything, you would be expected to demonstrate a greater understanding of the 'issues' within the Police at the moment.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - welshlad
i was always under the impression that the only advantage that most of our specials had was that it gave them the oppurtunity to see if a career in the police was for them as for recruiting from the specials quite a few actually got turned down the first time they applied, i dont think as MLC says it has any real advantage and can be more of a hinderence (but hey they have to get PCSO's from somewhere :-) )
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Optimist
I'm not sure that being a policeman makes you an "expert on the police". I'd have thought they were two different things.

I don't claim to be an expert (but I think you do). I'm just a bloke whose principal contact with the police is to wince when I look at the expense of half a dozen cars and a helicopter in avid pursuit of some teen-age joy-rider.

At least that was my contact until recently when I tried to report a fraud in which money was stolen from my bank account, only to be told that the police don't record reports of such crime from the public any longer. Now you're the expert so tell me what you make of that. Or rather don't, because it's indefensible.

And I'm entirely in sympathy with what Westpig says. I know quite well how selective TV can be. But you (ie the police) let yourselves be filmed and when you do that you offer everyone the chance to have an opinion. If you don't adequately demonstrate the complexity of your jobs you have to look to yourselves.

Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Westpig
I don't claim to be an expert (but I think you do). I'm just a bloke whose principal

contact with the police is to wince when I look at the expense of half a dozen cars and
a helicopter in avid pursuit of some teen-age joy-rider.

what's the alternative? If you let people go and do what they like and did not pursue them, then every oik that wanted to do anything at all that was illegal would simply hop in a car or on a motorcycle and off they'd go with impunity...we'd then have anarchy. Don't know whether or not you've been watching The Interceptors, but IMO Essex Police absoluteley have the right way of doing things...properly train their staff and give them the right tools to do the job...most other places fudge the issue due to the monetary costs...the modern way of doing things seems to be tie one hand behind your back, give you loads of H&S weariness, loads of targets, loads of forms and still moan when the job's not done. Still at least it's good to have the public on your side, they understand
...:-)
At least that was my contact until recently when I tried to report a fraud
in which money was stolen from my bank account only to be told that the
police don't record reports of such crime from the public any longer. Now you're the
expert so tell me what you make of that. Or rather don't because it's indefensible.


I think fraud should be investigated, but over the years it hasn't and now with an Act of Parliament there's no real requirement to in many cases. That legislation has been introduced by MPs voted for by the public in a democracy. The reason why as stated on a previous thread is a matter of 'needs must' and concentrating on other priorities.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Optimist
I think fraud should be investigated, but over the years it hasn't and now with an Act of Parliament there's no real requirement to in many cases. That legislation has been introduced by MPs voted for by the public in a democracy.>>


No, that's not right but it's what I was told by my local force and quoted it on here. It's an agreement between ACPO and the banks. Non-statutory. No vote. No democracy. I was a fool to believe what I was told and pass it on as fact. Look at the Home Office identity-theft.org.uk site and you'll see what I mean.

There are various knock-on effects which I won't go on about because they're not motoring related. Have a look at the site, WP. Read and weep.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Westpig
Card victims told 'don't call police'
Sean Poulter, Daily Mail
30 March 2007

Victims of debit and credit card fraud are being told not to bother reporting the crime to police.

A change in the law means that from Sunday they should contact their bank instead.

The move was called 'astounding' by security experts, who suggest it amounts to the privatisation of the justice system. They said it appeared to be an attempt by Government, police and banks to push the crime - which costs the nation £428m a year - under the carpet.

The changes, hidden in the small print of the 2006 Fraud Act, cover any deception involving cheques, plastic cards or online transactions. They come into force on 1 April.

Banks will be responsible for collating fraud figures and passing these to police, together with any evidence they uncover of major criminal gangs. But critics suspect the banks will be able to manipulate card fraud figures to mislead the public about the severity of the issue.

They also warned that police teams with expertise in investigating card fraud are being disbanded. Last year, there were 700,000 individual cases of card fraud, with the average loss totalling £608.

The changes were spelt out by The Association of Payment Clearing Services (Apacs), which is the trade body for the plastic card operations of the big banks and credit card companies.

It said: 'In most cases consumers will be required to report instances of this type of fraud straight to their bank or building society and not to the police.

'It will be up to the financial institution involved, and not the account holder, to pass details of the relevant crime on to police.'

The group's communications director, Sandra Quinn, insisted the changes were an attempt to cut bureaucracy.

'This change simply removes an additional level of reporting and will provide greater consistency for the reporting of fraud losses in the UK,' she added.

'Apacs will provide the Home Office with the industry's fraud figures for cheque, plastic and online banking fraud losses - these losses will then be published as part of the Government's annual crime figures, thereby giving a more realistic picture of the scale of this type of crime.'

Where a card is taken as a result of a second crime, such as the theft of a wallet or burglary, these second crimes should continue to be reported to the police. Miss Quinn added: 'The threat of fraud is, unfortunately, a part of our daily lives . . . the industry remains committed to a multi-layered approach to tackling card fraud.'

Card fraud expert Andrew Goodwill, managing director of the security firm Early Warning UK, condemned the shift in responsibility as 'good news for plastic cheats'. He added: 'Our police officers receive some of the best training in the world when it comes to collecting evidence of fraud.

'Why are we now being shortchanged by allowing the banks to collect this evidence? Fraud is a criminal offence. What extra training will bank officials receive to do the same job? I doubt any. With the banks then reporting these crimes en masse, will the banks report all instances of card fraud to the police in this way or will they pick and choose and just report the ones where they suffer a loss? If the banks don't report all card fraud, simply writing some of it off, the result will be a distortion of the extent of credit card crime.'

And he added: 'The problem is that the fraud is increasing rapidly and the police just do not have the resources to cope. Rather than give the police the tools to deal with this, the Home Office has hived the problem off to the banks and tried to bury it. If the criminals see that the police are no longer investigating most card fraud and it is treated as merely a commercial issue, then the problem will inevitably increase.

'The criminals will take the view there is much less of a risk of being caught.'

Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Optimist
The changes, hidden in the small print of the 2006 Fraud Act, cover any deception involving cheques, plastic cards or online transactions. They come into force on 1 April. >>


Thanks for this.

I did look at the Fraud Act of 2006 but couldn't find this. I don't see how anyone can legislate in such a way that I'm not allowed to report a crime of theft. I still think it's policy rather than statute until someone shows me the page. The Home Office, ACPO, banks thing came into force from 1 April 2007. Not in Scotland, by the way.

So if I have my car stolen and the insurance company will pay out, why not leave it to them to record and report the crime? Ditto if my house is broken into.

Edited by Webmaster on 19/06/2008 at 22:32

Is that police car behind in a hurry? - welshlad
are you really surprised that the govt wanted fraud off the radar after all they are the biggest culprits
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Leif
snipquote!
what's the alternative? If you let people go and do what they like and did
not pursue them then every oik that wanted to do anything at all that was
illegal would simply hop in a car or on a motorcycle and off they'd go
with impunity...we'd then have anarchy.


Well if the rate of joy-riding stays the same, you end up spending a fortune, and having to cut back elsewhere. But if joy-riding substantially reduces, then the cost though initially high, reduces, and you might end up paying no more.

I wonder which is the actual case?

Edited by Dynamic Dave on 17/06/2008 at 14:03

Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Fullchat
The complexities, dangers and frustrations of the 'job' have been adequately described on this forum time and time and time again. Its been said before Everyone is an 'arm chair expert ' and everyone has an opinion, to which they are entitled, be it good bad or indifferent. Few people actually know what policing is really about and they are the people who strive, despite all the constraints and criticisms, to maintain some form of law and order in our society. So I think you can call them experts.

However the comment "............when I look at the expense of half a dozen cars and a helicopter in avid pursuit of some teen-age joy-rider." is typical of those so called experts who pass comment and has no substance. Firstly, in this country you will never see half a dozen cars and helicopter chasing except in a carefully coordinated Pursuit Management scenario on a motorway. 'Teenage joyrider' - unless you are blessed with being able to look into the future then the outcome is not known until the conclusion.

So I'm afraid your comment is shallow.


Is that police car behind in a hurry? - midlifecrisis
I'm a serving Officer with a very long 13 years left to do.

Where fraud is concerned, as you will be re-imbursed, the bank is deemed to be the victim. They have their own fraud teams and work with the Police when required.

As for pursuits, I think my colleagues have said everything that needs be said.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - fox83
why do people constantly 'blame' the police for everything? the police dont make the law, they just do there best to enforce it. there are many people who constantly moan and whinge about police and often witness crimes and then become deaf dumb and blind and do very little to help. I dont claim to be an expert by any means but from my own observation the police find it increasingly difficult to do there job as 'joe public' are often un co-operative and unhelpful. But still the first to whinge when they are a victim of crime themselves.

i think in general police officers take a lot of flack for things they have absolutley no control over.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Lud
police officers take a lot of flack for things they have
absolutley no control over.


Well, yes. Indeed when police officers are short or grumpy with members of the public that is quite often one of the reasons. One has to remember that they often have to enforce laws and regulations they don't agree with themselves.

A lot of people find this hard to understand though, just as they can't usually get their heads round the idea that the prime minister, whoever he or she may be, doesn't run the country single-handed, any more than a bloodstained dictator can attain that status all by him (or her) self.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - rustbucket
Friday evening on way home from work a police car with lights / siren going came up behind me.I indicated left pulled hard over to the kerb and stoped as I was aproaching a set of traffic lights about 50 yards a head.In amazement a vehicle coming in the opposite direction slowed down and stopped adjacent to me blocking the road.I cannot make out if the other driver just panicked and did not know what to do or was just oblivious to his surroundings.I then pulled forward to create a gap, but it still caused the police car to slow considerably.
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - bathtub tom
I do confess that once driving an empty two tonne panel van, listening to 'sympathy for the devil' loudly, to overcome the rattling within, I couldn't understand why the car in front was slowing. I checked my mirrors a couple of times (no rear windows), and was almost tempted to overtake before I saw the 'blues' behind. I never heard the 'twos' :>{
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - Bilboman
I was in the motorhome. It was me, I cannot lie.
My wife left me a year ago for a policeman. I was in my motorhome on my way to a passionate month long holiday with my gorgeous new wife of 19.
When I saw the blue lights charging up behind me, I obviously didn't pull out of the way.
There was a very real chance that it was my ex wife's new feller - trying to give her back.
;-)
Is that police car behind in a hurry? - deepwith
I am not sure if the cyclist was deaf and/or blind, but have just seen the utmost stupidity. There is a three way mini roundabout with a fire station next to it, where ambulances also sit waiting for a call. I stopped, as did the other traffic, as an ambulance car came out of the station with all lights flashing and siren on. Cyclist undertook me then drove diagonally across the roundabout, cutting across the ambulance (good reaction from driver) on the roundabout and into a one way street - the wrong way. Not sure how he achieved his grey hair status, but there you go.
 

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