Psycho II - colin
Following on loosely from the thread about the psychology of drivers who feel obliged to park with two wheels on the sidewalk, another piece of psycho musing.

Amazing how many drivers are reluctant to get to the crown of the road when waiting to turn right. We have a family joke about this (which Sue is not going to like). It is maintained that whenever I'm held up in this way I sing out "It's a lady!" or "Come on now, Mary!", even before I've seen the driver. I'm usually right. My wife maintains that it's because women are conditioned from birth to give way to men.

One shouldn't generalise but actually I'm sure that insurance statistics would confirm my view that women make much safer drivers than men. Sorry, Sue, that must look patronising. Not intended at all.
Re: Psycho II - Andy
It depends what you call 'safer'. I used to work in an office overlooking a large car park, and almost every minor bump (usually during reversing or trying to get into a gap at an angle) was caused by a woman. These incidents may cause less injury than a male-caused pile-up, but there were far more of them!

I am guilty of playing 'spot the woman', too. I agree about the right turn thing, and I can usually spot a woman by the amount of 'frabbing about' that goes on before the car pulls away - - you can see the HANDBRAKE OFF, CLUTCH DOWN, SELECT GEAR, by which time the lights are in danger of going to red again.....
Re: Psycho II - Tomo
Better than sitting in gear edging forward on the clutch, or engaged auto. In my humble opinion
Re: Psycho II - Andy
Hi Tomo - I've got to agree that those strange people who constantly edge forward at the lights are annoying and possibly dangerous, but those women seem to take sooooo long to get going......
....and when it comes to dropping off their kids at school they don't park up, they just stop in the road!
Re: Psycho II - ladas are cool
i have a school at the end of the street that i live on, and every day at about 3.15pm the place is full of women drivers in people carriers, and 4X4's, the problem is that the road is tiny, and like andy says, these women drivers dont park, they just stop in the middle of the road, or double park. CRAZY.
Re: Psycho II - ladas are cool
also i wonder if carol adams will say anything about this thread.
Re: Psycho II - Sue
Andy wrote:
>
> Hi Tomo - I've got to agree that those strange people who
> constantly edge forward at the lights are annoying and
> possibly dangerous,

- but then, they couldn't possibly let a woman get away first, could they?

> but those women seem to take sooooo long to get going......

... may be struggling with an unfamiliar car and argumentative children on too little sleep ...

> ....and when it comes to dropping off their kids at school
> they don't park up, they just stop in the road!

Believe me, men AND women do this. But the worst example I've seen recently was definitely a man.

Look, the reason you see more women do this than men is that the men have gone off to work earlier than the women, leaving the women to get out of the house in a tearing hurry to drop the kids before they go to work or whatever.

And if we want to continue discussing the difference between the sexes, who has the biggest say in *choosing* the car in most households?
Re: Psycho II - Dave
Sue wrote:

> Look, the reason you see more women do this than men is that
> the men have gone off to work earlier than the women,

Ahh so men work longer hours and women are slackers...

No wonder the political parties need women only shortlists if tottie can't get it's pretty little self out of bed before 8:45.

;-)
Re: Psycho II - Sue
Dave wrote:
>
> Sue wrote:
>
> > Look, the reason you see more women do this than men is that
> > the men have gone off to work earlier than the women,
>
> Ahh so men work longer hours and women are slackers...
>
> No wonder the political parties need women only shortlists if
> tottie can't get it's pretty little self out of bed before
> 8:45.
>
> ;-)

I love the Back Room, it confirms all my prejudices about men who know anything about cars ;-)

Mine doesn't, but after him working part-time and me full-time for two years, we have just swapped back again. We both know who works hardest now - and I won't comment on the last two years.
Re: Psycho II - Martyn (Back Room Moderator)
Sue wrote:

> ... may be struggling with an unfamiliar car and
> argumentative children on too little sleep ...

Sue, I'm going to quote a reply I made on June 16 here:

"My heart is still thumping after what happened yesterday morning. I travel into work along a series of narrow lanes in Sussex, usually before 8am. But yesterday I was a mite late and hit the 4x4 Mums coming in the opposite direction -- one of them almost literally ('hit', I mean...). She appeared around a bend in what is more or less a single-track road, and was leaning into the back of her Freelander messing about with one of the kids. She did not see me until the last minute, and I swear I heard her scream... All I can say is that it's a good job for me the road is bounded at that point with hedgerow rather than the usual ditch-and-drystone wall, otherwise HJ would be looking for a temporary moderator for The Back Room."

The point is, if she's unfamiliar with the car, or has argumentative kids, or has had too little sleep (note the use of "or", and note also that "she" could equally be "he"), then she should not be driving. Full stop.

I'm sorry, because that looks like an attack on women drivers. Nothing could be further from the truth. But in this context, for the reasons you state, it usually *is* the woman who drives the kids to school. Perhaps they could walk (most schools are less than a mile from home), thereby cutting obesity and traffic density problems at a stroke.
Re: Psycho II - Dan J
Another thing that doesn't help - The vaguely recent trend of many people to have 4x4's (and no offence or wish to be sexist, but it is frequently mother's round the schools etc who prefer these 'high-up vehicles' though applies to many of my own lot from "Mars" as well) who then drive them exactly like they used to thrash their Escort estate around. You cannot drive a 4x4 in the same way as a car but this is never taken into consideration by the people who buy the car, who drive them or the garages who sell them (I have no doubt there are exceptions to the latter though). I live in Cheshire near many country lanes and I have seen rather too many 4x4's lying upside down in fields or driven through fences (NOT farming 4x4's either, I'm talking Freelanders and RAV4's!). These are the same people who then put the accident down to a slippy road or something similar, get a replacement through insurance and then doubltessly drive that one in the same manner... I wouldn't mind, but it isn't just their own lives they're putting in danger.
Re: Psycho II - John Slaughter
Dan

It can work to your advantage. Recently, I was being tailgated by a Frontera in the country roads, which included a long, tightening left hander I know well. Frontera driver now knows why Shuey and Co don't drive 4x4's. Kept a bit of space after that.

But, it illustrates the problem you highlight. The impression given is that 4x4's are 'safe'. Problem is the manoeverability and braking are compromised and your chances of avoiding an accident are minimised, compared to a normal car. I know it's true having had a RR for a year. Good visibilty yes, but you need it to plan the manoevres. If something spins in front of you on the motorway, you've less chance of avoiding it in a heavy vehicle with a high C of G - you can't alter the laws of physics.

Richard Branson is a prime culprit. Having survived a rollover accident many years ago when a tyre blew on his Range Rover, he immediately ordered a fleet of them because of the 'safety'. As was pointed out at the time, if he'd been driving a luxury car, it probably wouldn't have rolled in the first place.

Regards

John
Re: Psycho II - Sue
Martyn (Back Room Moderator) wrote:

> The point is, if she's unfamiliar with the car, or has
> argumentative kids, or has had too little sleep (note the use
> of "or", and note also that "she" could equally be "he"),
> then she should not be driving. Full stop.

On the whole agreed, but

a) my reply was in the context of people not pulling away as promptly as some men would apparently like from traffic lights

b) how does one get familiar with a car without driving it??? I'd say I'm still struggling with a borrowed one after 6 weeks: OK 'driving' it, but creep-crawling through traffic is not yet second nature!

c) parents, only take one child at a time!! (I have been known to stop the car until the row stops, but it's not always practical.)

d) both men and women drive when they should not, probably in equal numbers.

> I'm sorry, because that looks like an attack on women
> drivers. Nothing could be further from the truth. But in this
> context, for the reasons you state, it usually *is* the woman
> who drives the kids to school. Perhaps they could walk (most
> schools are less than a mile from home), thereby cutting
> obesity and traffic density problems at a stroke.

Mine do, and always have to Primary school. For secondary school they get the bus. May I now polish my halo? OK, maybe not.
Re: Psycho II - Martyn (Back Room moderator)
Sue wrote:
>
> On the whole agreed, but
>
> a) my reply was in the context of people not pulling away as
> promptly as some men would apparently like from traffic lights

Still holds, though. If you can't do it properly, then don't do it at all.

> b) how does one get familiar with a car without driving it???
> I'd say I'm still struggling with a borrowed one after 6
> weeks: OK 'driving' it, but creep-crawling through traffic is
> not yet second nature!

Ok, point taken. (Though rush-hour is not the time to hone one's skills or become familiar with a deadly weapon.)

> d) both men and women drive when they should not, probably in
> equal numbers.

I wouldn't want to argue with that at all.

> May I now polish my halo? OK, maybe not.

Please accept this slightly used tin of Silvo with my compliments!
Re: Psycho II - Tomo
"Work is the curse of the drinking classes" - Oscar Wilde.
Re: Psycho II - John Slaughter
Nothing to do with parking, but certainly a question for the psychologists, and related to the 'school run'.

We live about 5 minutes walk from a leisure centre with a fitness room etc. Both my wife and I are amazed at the number of neighours who actually drive that distance to attend their fitness classes etc. We must be mising something somewhere. A friend who used to work there actually said that some exercise class patrons came in complaining that 'it was so busy they had had to walk from the far end of the car park'. Sarcasm was only avoided in the interests of maintaining employment!

With mentality like that how on earth are the government going to reduce car use? Still, I suppose if they actually got any exercise by walking the leisure centre might lose most of its trade.

Regards

John
Re: Psycho II - Chris
I think this thread says more about the psychology of men than it does about women drivers - and my conclusions (as a man) are not pleasant.

As for walking. A friend of mine who works in the regional office of a big bank told me this story recently. The company decided on a more environmentally friendly approach, so closed down the work car park and converted it into a canteen/leisure centre. As an alternative it rented car parking space on the outskirts of town laid on a free luxury mini coach service into work. Some people didn't like it, and one person was heard to say "I don't do buses". When told that there was a pay and display carpark 300 yards up the road this person then said "I don't do walking". What can you do with people like that?

Chris
Re: Psycho II - Martyn (Back Room Moderator)
Chris wrote:

> As for walking. When told
> that there was a pay and display carpark 300 yards up the
> road this person then said "I don't do walking". What can you
> do with people like that?
>
> Chris

Cut off their redundant legs?
Re: Psycho II - Colin M
My neighbour just bought his wife a huge thing with a Chrysler badge on the back. Part of his decision making process was that she needed something that size to stand a chance in an accident as there were so many other giants on the road these days.

I say put the road tax up to £1,000 for them (they cause more wear and tear than a car don't they?). Get the government to publish the survivability figures in accidents involving people carriers and other 4WD monsters. In a car vs 4WD smash, invariably the car occupants are killed according to figures in the USA.

Why not just allocate blocks of time for drivers? 7.30-8.30 reps who are immune to manners and speed limits in built up areas, 8.30-10.00 is the school run cum health club cum supermarket shuffle, 10.00-3.30 open for all, 3.30-5.00, the school mums again, 5.00-7.00 Astra man takes over again and after midnight, why not just suspend all speed limits, insurance and drink drive limits and make it a free for all (which it seems to be where I live anyway)?

Colin
Re: Psycho II - Chris
Colin M wrote:
>
> I say put the road tax up to £1,000 for them (they cause more
> wear and tear than a car don't they?).

In the States they don't have to meet the same emissions targets as normal cars do, either. Since most SUVs are sold in both markets is that also true here? Pretty scandalous if so. If you get a tax break for being better than average on emissions, it seems fair that you should be penalised for being way over average.

A couple of weeks ago the police had to come and move one from outside the school up the road here. It had been "parked" more or less front end in, blocking most of the road while mummy dearest took little Johnny in for his first day and stayed inside for an hour. People had to use the pavement to drive their normal cars past. The police towed it. How I (and a couple of other vindictive neighbours) laughed when she came out to find it gone.

Chris
Re: Psycho II - Dan J
Fantastic - it's always a pleasure to hear of moments where real motoring stupidity are actually dealt with (and properly) by the Police. Bet she had to part with a few quid to get it back again...
Re: Psycho II - Chris
They were actually smiling as they broke in and hitched it up, and moved really quickly to be away before she came out. It was great to watch.

Chris
Re: Psycho II - GRowlette-THe Growler's Girl
MY God what boring lives some of you lead.
Re: Psycho II - Andy
The other evening I walked around to the off-licence for my 'medicine'. It's a 5-minute walk there and another 5 back. On the way out I passed a neighbour who was just climbing into his ruddy great Mitsubishi Pajero 4x4. When I arrived at the shop, his wagon is just clattering to a halt in the car park.
I couldn't believe he had driven such a short distance, so I convinced myself that he must be on his way out and was collecting a bottle of wine on the way. No he wasn't!
On my way back his car passed me, and it was parked up outside his house when I passed.
Can you believe this laziness?
By the way, this vehicle is his wife's car. They have two kids, no dogs and do not deal in antiques - so why the enormous motor?
Re: Psycho II - Tom Shaw
Just cross your fingers that they keep it long enough for all the short journeys to cause some expensive engine damage.......
Re: Psycho II - Jonathan
small whatumecallit
 

Value my car