Mobiles - again - helicopter
In the words of the Irish my previous thread , 'mobile owners defiant' appears to have disappeared from the forum.

Any reason please Mods other than the 'handbags at dawn' attitude of a couple of the posts? I thought we had a good discussion going.
Mobiles - again - No Do$h
It got a bit too silly and some of the personal attacks taking place were considered ott so it got pulled.
Mobiles - again - helicopter
Seems a bit of a shame. I thought we had a serious safety issue which needed airing about using hands free, particularly dialling when driving. Also whether we need to use the things at all when driving a car.It seems to me business should be confined to the office or at least off the road.
On the road 100% concentration is needed. Turn 'em off I say.
Mobiles - again - Mark (RLBS)
By all means carry on with the debate. And I agree its serious and needs airing.

The last one disappeared for the reasons No Dosh stated.
Mobiles - again - matt35 {P}
Mark,

I will probably be attacked as much as the guy with the small penis and the two big cars who posted last week....maybe with justification for my attitude to driving and phoning!

It is simply not possible to be in control of a car and to listen to, or talk, on a phone.

I know that it is a requirement for many people driving company cars, with company phones - I doubt if the present Government have the guts to go after the companies for their responsibility in this - but it will be done, sometime, if sense prevails.

Matt35

Mobiles - again - cockle {P}
I know that it is a requirement for many people driving
company cars, with company phones - I doubt if the present
Government have the guts to go after the companies for their
responsibility in this - but it will be done, sometime,
if sense prevails.


Funnily enough I think that is where the pressure will come from, certain companies are telling their employees that regardless of hands-free being fitted they should not now be making any calls from their cars whilst on the move. The driving force behind these decisions is that, now there is some form of legislation, if it was found that someone had an accident while engaged on a business call then the HSE might deem the company to not be exercising a duty of care to the employee, particularly if the call was from their boss. Such is the reputation of the HSE of jumping on these things some companies are not willing to be the first in the dock and have instituted complete bans, I know of at least two companies who have actually removed hands-free kits from their vehicles.

Sadly, like many other things, if people had been sensible in the first place legislation would never have been needed. Yet again everyone becomes the victim of catch all solutions.

Whether the police will be able to meaningfully enforce it is another matter considering the laws which are apparently unenforcable already.

Cockle
Mobiles - again - Dynamic Dave
It is simply not possible to be in control of a car and to
listen to, or talk, on a phone.


Yes and no. I've said it before, different people have different levels of driving skills. Some feel more confident behind the wheel and can accomplish a number of different tasks without so much as batting an eyelid, whereas others go to pieces at the thought of changing gear, or reversing.

A friend's wife cannot drive the family car when they have their two kids on board. The noise generated from the back seat makes it impossible for her to concentrate, so my friend has to do all the driving. She can't even drive with the radio on.

I drove down the A34 in pouring down rain today averaging 75mph. Spray being kicked up from other vehicles, idiots with no lights on, ect ect. At one point I made a 10 minute phone call (on hands free) without being distracted from my driving at all.


To sum up, some people can rub their tummy with one hand and pat their head at the same time with the other hand; some people cannot. (and obviously not while driving)
Mobiles - again - Honestjohn
My phone went once at 162mph. So I left it in my pocket.

HJ
Mobiles - again - Mark (RLBS)
Mine once went at around 500mph and the Air Hostess was pretty damned annoyed.

At 162mph, which I have travelled at, I don't think I would even notice the phone ringing due to the desperate need to concentrate on other things.
Mobiles - again - Honestjohn
Even at 162mph it's hard to ignore a vibraphone in your pocket, but you simply have to decide which is the most important: pay any attention at all to the phone, or concentrate on driving. However, it doesn't take much concentration to pick up or make a call when you're stuck solid at 0mph in a traffic jam. And, unless you don't have to hold the phone to do so, even that will be illegal under the new laws. As to whether making a call from a plane while it's in the air could have endangered everyone on board and everyone on the ground where the plane crashed is something I don't know the true facts about. But, just like everyone else, once the plane has docked, I switch my phones on. I don't believe I can crash the plane doing that.

HJ
Mobiles - again - Andrew-T
If you are doing 162mph in the circumstances most of us are talking about, it's irrelevant whether you are using your mobile.
Mobiles - again - Mark (RLBS)
one telephone is not likely to mess with an airplane, many phones might. And, I hasten to add, I didn't know it was switched on.

The problem with cell phones and driving is complex. The reality may be that a particular driver is not more careless or dangerous. It may even be that you and 1,000 drivers you know are not more careless or dangerous. However, the motoring population as a whole is safer if it does not use mobile phones while driving.

And sadly you can't really make a law to cope with that, because you would then have a subjective law, and those are nasty - for example the "sus" laws.

Of course, the rest of it is nothing to do with mobile phones and a lot to do with smokescreens and distractions.

Mobiles - again - henry k
one telephone is not likely to mess with an airplane, many
phones might. And, I hasten to add, I didn't know it
was switched on.


I recall seeing the TV coverage in flight of a passenger using a camera phone to take shots of the Webb Ellis cup etc. No excuse of I didn't know it was switched on unless only the camera bit is activated which I doubt. So I guess it is alright to use a phone on board now.I am not aware of any action by BA or anyone else.
Mobiles - again - matt35 {P}
Mark,
What were you doing with the Hostess at 500 mph to make her so annoyed?
I have very fond memories of a flight on B'Cal from Sao Paolo to LHR via Madrid - empty DC10 - wnen a mobile phone would have taken the Hostess' eye of the ball, so to speak.
Matt35.
Mobiles - again - v8man
My phone rang in my bumbag while circulating the Nurburgring on my motorbike earlier this year. I thought it best to wait until I got back to the pits!
Mobiles - again - cockle {P}
v8man, Mark(RLBS) & HJ,
I think the HSE would have been happy with that, after all you all made a calculated risk assessment... ;-)

Cockle
Mobiles - again - v8man
Oh no! That phrase again! (Risk assessment) Reminds me of work,
Mobiles - again - helicopter
I too saw the mobile phone user photographing the world cup.
I agree the HSE should put pressure on companies to stop their employees taking or making phone calls when driving, sooner the better IMO.
Its a bit of a side issue to the thread but I travel a lot by air in my business and every time the warnings are given out about emergency exits and lifejackets etc you will find , if you listen, that a request is made that mobiles are turned off because they may interfere with the aircraft control systems, in the same way as they ask you to turn off your mobile at petrol stations.
It amazes me that most people seem to ignore warnings that are there for their own safety.
Its this attitude that 'oh but it doesn't apply to me' about issues of safety that really get me annoyed.
I do not accept that because someone else doesn't care about the rules and regulations they put my life at risk.
Turn the pink fluffy dice things off in cars , aircraft and also around hospitals and do us all a favour.
Mobiles - again - pdc {P}
On business flights you are told that you should switch off your phone when the cabin doors are closed. most passengers seem to sit in their seats and then continue with their calls until the door is shut. likewise, on landing, as soon as the doors are opened all the phones are switched on, and thousands of beeps emit as everyone receives an SMS telling them they have voicemail.

Try doing that when travelling cattle class on holiday and you get some knowitall admonishing you loudly for using your phone while on the ground.

This is an observation only, and I have not been on receiving end of said knowitall.

And how come Lufthansa offer a mobile in air service using their network, and standard GSM phones, but you can't use your own? Are their radio waves somehow safer (and yes, I do realise your phone can see too many base stations aloft, and Lufthansa will have a build in base station_)
Mobiles - again - helicopter
Emirates also have individual phones on each seat arm which you can use in flight, presumably this is a system that is checked out when they build the plane and therefore does not interfere with 'fly by wire ' systems.
I do have memories of seeing film on TV of I believe an Airbus coming in to land at Paris ( bit hazy on the details) but as the Captain was trying to land the 'fly by wire' was saying it was not safe and over ruling him resulting in it trying to loop the loop. I believe he got it down safely but I'm surely glad I was not on board.
I don't know what caused it but I would not like to think it was a mobile phone user.('Hello love - yes we're just coming in to land'.'No we're not, Yes we are No we're not etc etc.)
Turn 'em off.
Mobiles - again - jeds
I have used mobile phones while driving extensively over the last 6 or 7 years, both hands free and handheld. I have never had a close shave but I have occasionally missed motorway junctions while on the phone.

While on the phone, I have tended to leave a bit more reaction time between myself and the car in front and I would not worry about ignoring the phone to deal with a situation.

There is no question in my mind that the most dangerous part of driving and phoning is dialling the number. This is definitely worse when the phone is on a cradle. I used to often take the phone off the cradle so I could hold it closer to eye level while dialling.

Can you see where this is going? The most dangerous part of phoning and driving is the part that is still apparently legal and the legislation makes this even more dangerous than it used to be because you now cannot hold the phone at eye level.

Now that a ban is here the only sensible way forward is a total ban.
Mobiles - again - cockle {P}
Emirates also have individual phones on each seat arm which you
can use in flight, presumably this is a system that is
checked out when they build the plane and therefore does not
interfere with 'fly by wire ' systems.
I do have memories of seeing film on TV of I
believe an Airbus coming in to land at Paris ( bit
hazy on the details) but as the Captain was trying to
land the 'fly by wire' was saying it was not safe
and over ruling him resulting in it trying to loop the
loop. I believe he got it down safely but I'm surely
glad I was not on board.
I don't know what caused it but I would not like
to think it was a mobile phone user.('Hello love - yes
we're just coming in to land'.'No we're not, Yes we are
No we're not etc etc.)
Turn 'em off.

>>

Mobiles can cause problems to other electrical/electronic equipment but by varying degrees.
Lay your mobile close to your PC monitor and ring it, you'll see an interesting effect. Certainly a mobile turned on within a metre of some of my audio level measuring kit will distort the readings by as much as 5dB, interestingly the older analogue mobiles made a difference of up to 8dB anywhere within 2 metres, obviously because they were on a higher power.

In the early days of mobiles the screening on most electronic appliances was pretty poor and there were tales of hospital paging systems being affected as well as medical equipment, hence the blanket ban in hospitals. Things have moved on somewhat and the GSM phones transmit much lower power but the ban remains 'just in case'. Many places have jumped on the bandwagon, though, my doctors' surgery has a ban on mobiles 'in case they interfere with medical equipment', the only equipment in his surgery is the digital blood pressure monitor, his computer, his phone and his fax. While I was sitting in his room one day he actually took a call on his mobile, when I mentioned it he said the ban was really so he didn't have to listen to a waiting room full of mobiles bleeping all day and that no-one would take any notice unless they thought it affected essential equipment.

Phones provided on aircraft will be designed for that purpose and will have been tested to death to make sure they don't interfere with the aircraft systems, not too sure that the handset manufacturers have applied the same tests to their products though.

Often feel for the mobile companies, they are the worst of the worst and also the best of the best. Nobody wants a mast within a mile of their house but everyone expects to turn their mobile on and be able to make a call from virtually anywhere. Most people seem to regard them as essential but don't want to hear anybody else's ring.
C'est la vie.

Cockle
 

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