VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - Roy Brown

So I can't seem to find a mechanic local that is willing to replace an engine in my 2010 Jetta 1.9 TDi and I am thinking on giving it a shot myself along with some friends. From googling it is the same as the Seat/VW/Audi variants i.e A3 etc

I would consider myself fairly handy when doing work on cars, but I have never done anything this big before. i.e i've done wheel bearings/hubs, suspension changes, radiators,differential changes, brakes along with the usual servicing.

But i'm a bit apprehensive about diving into it as I know it is a big job. I'm just looking some advice if any one has done this type of work to one of these cars before I would be interested to hear more

I have the replacement engine sitting ready to go in also

Thanks in advance

VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - Andrew-T

I have never had the urge or the equipment to try this sort of thing, but I would guess the heavy kit you might need would depend on whether the engine came out upwards or downwards ? Haynes manuals usually describe this operation in some detail.

VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - madf

I would imagine it's a drop suspension engine out through the bottom job...

Which means you need length and height in the workspace and very heavy lilting gear for the body..

VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - gordonbennet

From what you have already described you are pretty hands on anyway, the only extras are disconnecting the drive shafts exhaust wiring and gear linkage, but you will probably need to hire in a decent piece of manual lifting equipment unless you have sturdy cross beams in your garage assuming the roof is high enough when a block and tackle and strong webbing straps or chains will do fine.

Have a poke nose on youtube, someone will have done the job on a similar vehicle.

Take a tip, empty all coolant out completely before putting the vehicle in place to work on then drain the oil because if the engine falls over or you drop the old one on the sump it won't be such a disaster, there is nothing worse than working in wet filthy conditions, and if you need to buy a trolley jack buy a good one that will last you a lifetime, Weber is a good make to start looking at, if you think about it the savings alone on doing this job yourself will pay for that jack and probably the lifting frame too, they are then yours for life.

Remove all radiators even if it looks like there's room without doing so.

A couple of decent mates and you can soon have a little team going which will save you a fortune over the years helping each other on such jobs.

Edited by gordonbennet on 12/03/2020 at 13:29

VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - Chris M

I'm with GB here. You sound pretty competent. I'd add some decent axle stands as the job will require crawling underneath.

Get a Haynes manual and read it thoroughly. One of the things that gets tedious with them nowadays is they keep referring to other chapters and sections. Read those sections before starting as I've found in the past that simple instructions like remove starter motor, mean remove xy and z first, and you need a tool you don't have to remove y. The tool may only be a stubby spanner or extra long extension bar, but you're snookered without it.

VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - JoeB

I thought on these you can pull the powertrain out through the front? Take off bumper, radiator support etc and move the rad and a/c condenser out of the way. Then wheel the engine and trans through the front.

VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - Big John

I thought by 2010 the Jetta was fitted with either the 1.6 or 2.0 CR diesel (think the 1.9 was until Sept 2009)

In 2010 any diesel witll have a DPF so that wil complicate things - if it is somehow a leftover 1.9 pd with DPF then the implementation is poor and I think there was a mechanical modification for this to work (all to do with the camshaft operated pd injectors). The 1.9 pd was a good engine but it didn't work well with a DPF.

There are suitable Haynes manuals available on fleabay on it's removal but you'll need to take the front of the car to bits (beware air con) and whilst the new engine is out of the car consider fitting a new cambelt kit/ wayter pump

VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - edlithgow

VERY hard here.

It used to be completely illegal.

Now its apparently possible if its EXACTLY the same model of engine, BUT you have to fill in A LOT of forms in Chinese, and pay the government A LOT of money. to re-regtster the car, and/or there are (inevitably) fixer guys with contacts who you pay A LOT of money to and they...er...grease the wheels, as it were.

Seldom, therefore, an economic proposition unless its some shiny money-no-object exotica.

Not directly useful info to you, of course, but I thought it might encourage you a bit

VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - gordonbennet

VERY hard here.

It used to be completely illegal.

Who's going to tell them, or is the place awash with grasses looking for a pat on the head?

VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - edlithgow

VERY hard here.

It used to be completely illegal.

Who's going to tell them, or is the place awash with grasses looking for a pat on the head?

Serial numbers checked at six monthly inxpection.

Those aren't always uber-diligent, provided you go to a private inspection outfit and not a govt one, which are quite eager-beaverish about scrapping cars,

You can't, however, avoid the govt outfits on re-registration, so a re-engined car could never be sold.

You might be able to...er...buy a reliable level of absent-mindedness, at least at the private centres, most easily accomplished by employing an agent to do the inspection for you, but once you start that its an additional recurring cost for the liength of your ownership.

Re "or is the place awash with grasses looking for a pat on the head?" I'm afraid that, from my experience, that description would be a better fit with the UK. People here generally aren't sufficiently interested.

VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - gordonbennet

Wonder if the OP will ever return to tell us how the job went.

VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - edlithgow

Wonder if the OP will ever return to tell us how the job went.

Give him time. I'd stalli for quite a while before I takled something on that scale. You'd want an uninterrupted block of time in your workspace, arrange needed lifting gear and special tools, access to another vehicle to go for things you'd forgotten or didn't realise you'd need, and maybe you'd need to schedule helpers. Take a while to set up.

When I did it I almost got caught...er...borrowing a required wheel barrow and some scaffolding off a building site.

If I'd planned that I could have located them in advance rather than blundering around in the dark.

VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - Roy Brown

Thanks for the replies.

Don't worry about the engine numbers and selling because this car will not be sold. It is a 1.9 with a DPF and its registered early 2010. The replacement engine I got is the same engine code, and came from a Leon (also quipped with DPF)

Regarding the job, I only started it today for a few hours as I have been busy with work + other projects

I have managed to remove the front end off the car in 1 piece, removed the battery and tray, drive shafts so far. I think it should all be straight forward (fingers crossed) from here on

However, one concern I do have is the wiring loom, I was under the impression there would be at least 2 main plugs where everything would simply disconnect from - Am I wrong on that? (Ran out of time to get a further look, but will get back to it over the weekend)

VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - edlithgow

The engine number / selling stuff was in reference to regulations in Taiwan, where Im at.

Apologies for not being clear on that, though I did mention Chinese forms, a bit of a clue.

AFAIK there are no comparable regulatory restrictions in the UK.

Dunno about the wiring loom question, but someone will.

Hope the job goes well. Work Safe

VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - elekie&a/c doctor
The engine wiring harness terminates at the engine control unit , usually located up under the scuttle panel , near wipers . The only problem you may encounter , is that there is often a metal security cover over the Ecu , held on with shear bolts . Real pain in the rear .
VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - Roy Brown

A little update on this, progress is slow with work and this virus making it hard to get any supplies.

However, I now have the engine and gearbox removed. I have fitted the gearbox to the replacement engine along with a new clutch kit and flywheel. And all wiring etc swapped over.

The timing belt on the original engine has literally done a few hundred miles. I will be looking to swap this over to the replacement engine. I have ordered a locking tool for this, although I am a bit worried about making sure the engine is in top dead centre - Any tips for that?

VW Jetta - Replacing an engine - How hard is it? - Big John

It's not just the belt you need to consider it's also tensioner and studs. Buy a new kit that includes studs, tensioner and belts - false economy if you don't.

Put a new PD injector loom in whilst you are passing if you can - common fail as it sits in hot oil - really easy to fit if the engine isn't in the car. Likewise thermostat and temp sensor cheap and easy to fit at this stage. Obviously if you can get the bits!

Re TDC - I think there is a mark on the flywheel, others will hopefully comment.

Well done for getting on with it - it's been a while since I've done an engine change.

 

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