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Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - craig-pd130

The current issue of Autocar has a full road test of the basic Tesla 3.

The testers rated it highly, but I noted the 'real-world range' the magazine achieved in everyday driving (a mix of town and dual carriageway / motorway) was 155 miles, compared to Tesla's claimed 250. The test pointed out that if the driver kept below 50mph, up to 230 miles was possible.

While I might only do a journey of 150+ miles in a day once per month or so, I think I'd still find that range a bit limiting.

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - madf

The current issue of Autocar has a full road test of the basic Tesla 3.

The testers rated it highly, but I noted the 'real-world range' the magazine achieved in everyday driving (a mix of town and dual carriageway / motorway) was 155 miles, compared to Tesla's claimed 250. The test pointed out that if the driver kept below 50mph, up to 230 miles was possible.

While I might only do a journey of 150+ miles in a day once per month or so, I think I'd still find that range a bit limiting.

And I assume that testing was in summer.. so halve it for winter..

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - Brit_in_Germany

You get what you pay for though. If your car journeys are daily short drives then you can buy the basic version and if you want to be able to travel longer distances you can pay extra for the bigger battery pack.

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - Engineer Andy

The current issue of Autocar has a full road test of the basic Tesla 3.

The testers rated it highly, but I noted the 'real-world range' the magazine achieved in everyday driving (a mix of town and dual carriageway / motorway) was 155 miles, compared to Tesla's claimed 250. The test pointed out that if the driver kept below 50mph, up to 230 miles was possible.

While I might only do a journey of 150+ miles in a day once per month or so, I think I'd still find that range a bit limiting.

Imagine my surprise. I'd love to see some real-world winter testing, given EVs produce very little in the way of waste heat (unlike ICE cars, especially petrol-engined ones), thus I wonder on a cold day with the heater, lights and wipers on how much range it'll likely get. Even in hot summer conditions, most ICE cars' A/C system reduces the fuel efficiency by around 5%, sometimes more.

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - Sulphur Man

Am I the only person who doesnt see EV range as a huge stumbling block?

More range and more battery capacity = longer charging times. I'd be interested in a 150 mile range car that could charge to full capacity, at home on a wall charger, in less than an hour. And even quicker on public supercharger.

The majority of UK car journeys are under 20 miles, with less than 2 people on board, conducted in their local area. Provide that use case with a 150-mile/sub £20k EV that charges quickly and they could be very happy.

For longer journeys, just hire a diesel.

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - Leif

The current issue of Autocar has a full road test of the basic Tesla 3.

The testers rated it highly, but I noted the 'real-world range' the magazine achieved in everyday driving (a mix of town and dual carriageway / motorway) was 155 miles, compared to Tesla's claimed 250. The test pointed out that if the driver kept below 50mph, up to 230 miles was possible.

While I might only do a journey of 150+ miles in a day once per month or so, I think I'd still find that range a bit limiting.

Economy depends strongly on driving style. Motoring journalists seem to have heavy feet, so take any magazine review with plenty of salt. That said, my mower cuts my lawn on one charge in summer, but needs multiple charges in colder weather. I wonder if that holds true for cars.

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - galileo

The current issue of Autocar has a full road test of the basic Tesla 3.

The testers rated it highly, but I noted the 'real-world range' the magazine achieved in everyday driving (a mix of town and dual carriageway / motorway) was 155 miles, compared to Tesla's claimed 250. The test pointed out that if the driver kept below 50mph, up to 230 miles was possible.

While I might only do a journey of 150+ miles in a day once per month or so, I think I'd still find that range a bit limiting.

Economy depends strongly on driving style. Motoring journalists seem to have heavy feet, so take any magazine review with plenty of salt. That said, my mower cuts my lawn on one charge in summer, but needs multiple charges in colder weather. I wonder if that holds true for cars.

Cold temperature increases the internal resistance and lowers the capacity. A battery that provides 100 percent capacity at 27°C (80°F) will typically deliver only 50 percent at –18°C (0°F).

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - Leif

The current issue of Autocar has a full road test of the basic Tesla 3.

The testers rated it highly, but I noted the 'real-world range' the magazine achieved in everyday driving (a mix of town and dual carriageway / motorway) was 155 miles, compared to Tesla's claimed 250. The test pointed out that if the driver kept below 50mph, up to 230 miles was possible.

While I might only do a journey of 150+ miles in a day once per month or so, I think I'd still find that range a bit limiting.

Economy depends strongly on driving style. Motoring journalists seem to have heavy feet, so take any magazine review with plenty of salt. That said, my mower cuts my lawn on one charge in summer, but needs multiple charges in colder weather. I wonder if that holds true for cars.

Cold temperature increases the internal resistance and lowers the capacity. A battery that provides 100 percent capacity at 27°C (80°F) will typically deliver only 50 percent at –18°C (0°F).

Performance at lowish temperatures that we get here depends on the battery chemistry, some lithium ion cells survive cold quite well, others less so.

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - SLO76
For the bulk of users electric and hybrid cars rarely make any financial sense. I see loads of elderly pensioners well into their 70’s floating around here in Toyota Hybrids, particularly the Yaris Hybrids despite likely annual mileages of less than 5k. It makes no sense to spend thousands extra to save maybe £100-£200 a year on fuel, in fact heavier depreciation will more than wipe that out on certain models. Great used buys though.

There’s loads of them in Nissan Leafs too and again their mileage won’t be high yet depreciation eye watering. For some fuel economy and tax rates are the only thing of importance. A few years back I had s nice wee 1.25 Fiesta up for sale and despite being particularly nice I was struggling to move it as every person who called rejected the wee car as it fell into the £120 tax bracket, narrowly missing the Lower £20 rate.

The high mileage very tatty Pug 207 diesel I took in part-ex however sold almost instantly and would’ve over and over twenty times had I ready supply of them as it was £20 to tax and did 60mpg. The lass who bought it turned up with two ‘knowledgeable’ chaps to look it over, I informed them of every fault I could find on it and left them to decide for themselves on the understanding that at £550 it was sold as seen and I didn’t want them to darken my driveway again. If they had any doubts or were unhappy at all I’d call the next person on the list. They happily bought and drive off only to complain a month later when the clutch cable snapped. A minor fault which she said she’d been quoted £800 to fix! Idiocy and dishonesty know no bounds with Joe (or Jane) Punter.

Edited by SLO76 on 11/09/2019 at 12:30

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - nick62

SLO, honest question - how do you "get out" of any comeback on a sale like that, (i.e. with the clutch cable), when you are a dealer?

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - badbusdriver

SLO, honest question - how do you "get out" of any comeback on a sale like that, (i.e. with the clutch cable), when you are a dealer?

There is no "getting out of it", it says in his post that the punter and entourage were informed that at £550 it would be "sold as seen", i.e, no comeback, and no warranty.

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - madf

SLO, honest question - how do you "get out" of any comeback on a sale like that, (i.e. with the clutch cable), when you are a dealer?

There is no "getting out of it", it says in his post that the punter and entourage were informed that at £550 it would be "sold as seen", i.e, no comeback, and no warranty.

I believe you cannot escape law on car sales by any such statement..But given the age of the car sold, and its price and the warning.. any court would likely decide that it would be unreasnable - given te ewarnings and its price -t o epxect perfection.. (and I supsect SLO worked on that basis.

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - pd

SLO, honest question - how do you "get out" of any comeback on a sale like that, (i.e. with the clutch cable), when you are a dealer?

There is no "getting out of it", it says in his post that the punter and entourage were informed that at £550 it would be "sold as seen", i.e, no comeback, and no warranty.

I believe you cannot escape law on car sales by any such statement..But given the age of the car sold, and its price and the warning.. any court would likely decide that it would be unreasnable - given te ewarnings and its price -t o epxect perfection.. (and I supsect SLO worked on that basis.

People forget the law is there to protect the seller from unreasonable demands from the buyer as well.

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - pd

A car sold just above scrap price at £550 frankly only has to be as good as car right near scrapping. It does not need to be perfect and the comeback on such a car under law anyway is very, very little.

As long as it is not dangerous at point of sale and lasts a week there isn't much comeback.

If a car is stated as sold as seen that is also a factor.

The law is there to stop anyone being conned (both buyer AND seller) not to stop two adults coming to a sensible deal.

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - Engineer Andy
For the bulk of users electric and hybrid cars rarely make any financial sense. I see loads of elderly pensioners well into their 70’s floating around here in Toyota Hybrids, particularly the Yaris Hybrids despite likely annual mileages of less than 5k. It makes no sense to spend thousands extra to save maybe £100-£200 a year on fuel, in fact heavier depreciation will more than wipe that out on certain models. Great used buys though. There’s loads of them in Nissan Leafs too and again their mileage won’t be high yet depreciation eye watering. For some fuel economy and tax rates are the only thing of importance. A few years back I had s nice wee 1.25 Fiesta up for sale and despite being particularly nice I was struggling to move it as every person who called rejected the wee car as it fell into the £120 tax bracket, narrowly missing the Lower £20 rate. The high mileage very tatty Pug 207 diesel I took in part-ex however sold almost instantly and would’ve over and over twenty times had I ready supply of them as it was £20 to tax and did 60mpg. The lass who bought it turned up with two ‘knowledgeable’ chaps to look it over, I informed them of every fault I could find on it and left them to decide for themselves on the understanding that at £550 it was sold as seen and I didn’t want them to darken my driveway again. If they had any doubts or were unhappy at all I’d call the next person on the list. They happily bought and drive off only to complain a month later when the clutch cable snapped. A minor fault which she said she’d been quoted £800 to fix! Idiocy and dishonesty know no bounds with Joe (or Jane) Punter.

It still amazes me how so many people doing low annual mileages baulk at paying an extra £100 (or even £200 as I currently do) in VED to buy or keep an older car that is otherwise in perfectly serviceable condition, yet doesn't bat an eyelid at shelling out £15k, £25k or much more for an EV that might save them £750 a year in fuel and VED, which would take them (including taking into account all other costs) best part of 25 years to possibly recoup, if ever.

Bad enough for most of us, even worse if that person is of pensionable age that they'll likely never see a 'return' of their 'investment'.

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - nick62

EA, when did anyone let facts get in the way of "a good idea"?

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - pd

Whilst I agree there is a habit amongst the great car buying public to shell out silly money to save £100 a year on VED (it is amazing how popular £0 VED cars are) I do understand why the hybrids may suit some drivers.

Not everything is down to price. If you do a lot of urban driving combined with a little bit of general then the Toyota hybrids are simply much nicer to drive than their conventional equivalents. It's really nice edging forward in a town jam in silence with no vibration and they're quit fast where you need them as well.

Frankly, for some of the elderly drivers if they like them why not? You get to the point in life that saving for tomorrow is a bit dumb.

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - Engineer Andy

Whilst I agree there is a habit amongst the great car buying public to shell out silly money to save £100 a year on VED (it is amazing how popular £0 VED cars are) I do understand why the hybrids may suit some drivers.

Not everything is down to price. If you do a lot of urban driving combined with a little bit of general then the Toyota hybrids are simply much nicer to drive than their conventional equivalents. It's really nice edging forward in a town jam in silence with no vibration and they're quit fast where you need them as well.

Frankly, for some of the elderly drivers if they like them why not? You get to the point in life that saving for tomorrow is a bit dumb.

I never said it was. I was responding to a comment why some by 100% EV cars to save a few quid on VED. Hybrids are far cheaper, but even then you can buy a petrol-only ICE equivalent for several thousand less, and that won't have the problems associated with ultra low mileages made up of short urban journeys from cold (e.g. constantly drained hybrid batteries, thus using more fuel to charge them and becoming proverbial white elephants)

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - pd

Bad enough for most of us, even worse if that person is of pensionable age that they'll likely never see a 'return' of their 'investment'.

You get to a point in life you'll never see a return on an investment.

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - nick62

You get to a point in life you'll never see a return on an investment.

Usually the day after she says "yes". ;)

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - Leif
For the bulk of users electric and hybrid cars rarely make any financial sense. I see loads of elderly pensioners well into their 70’s floating around here in Toyota Hybrids, particularly the Yaris Hybrids despite likely annual mileages of less than 5k. It makes no sense to spend thousands extra to save maybe £100-£200 a year on fuel, in fact heavier depreciation will more than wipe that out on certain models. Great used buys though. There’s loads of them in Nissan Leafs too and again their mileage won’t be high yet depreciation eye watering. For some fuel economy and tax rates are the only thing of importance. A few years back I had s nice wee 1.25 Fiesta up for sale and despite being particularly nice I was struggling to move it as every person who called rejected the wee car as it fell into the £120 tax bracket, narrowly missing the Lower £20 rate. The high mileage very tatty Pug 207 diesel I took in part-ex however sold almost instantly and would’ve over and over twenty times had I ready supply of them as it was £20 to tax and did 60mpg. The lass who bought it turned up with two ‘knowledgeable’ chaps to look it over, I informed them of every fault I could find on it and left them to decide for themselves on the understanding that at £550 it was sold as seen and I didn’t want them to darken my driveway again. If they had any doubts or were unhappy at all I’d call the next person on the list. They happily bought and drive off only to complain a month later when the clutch cable snapped. A minor fault which she said she’d been quoted £800 to fix! Idiocy and dishonesty know no bounds with Joe (or Jane) Punter.

It still amazes me how so many people doing low annual mileages baulk at paying an extra £100 (or even £200 as I currently do) in VED to buy or keep an older car that is otherwise in perfectly serviceable condition, yet doesn't bat an eyelid at shelling out £15k, £25k or much more for an EV that might save them £750 a year in fuel and VED, which would take them (including taking into account all other costs) best part of 25 years to possibly recoup, if ever.

Bad enough for most of us, even worse if that person is of pensionable age that they'll likely never see a 'return' of their 'investment'.

In exactly the same vein, I’m amazed how many letters HJ publishes from people who have had their expensive car bought new for almost three years, and they say they are worried that the car will soon start costing money to maintain, so they had better buy a new one, and could he recommend a replacement. And he never ever says “Fer Christ’ sake just hang on to the old one mate/luv, it’ll be much cheaper in the long run”.

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - Engineer Andy
For the bulk of users electric and hybrid cars rarely make any financial sense. I see loads of elderly pensioners well into their 70’s floating around here in Toyota Hybrids, particularly the Yaris Hybrids despite likely annual mileages of less than 5k. It makes no sense to spend thousands extra to save maybe £100-£200 a year on fuel, in fact heavier depreciation will more than wipe that out on certain models. Great used buys though. There’s loads of them in Nissan Leafs too and again their mileage won’t be high yet depreciation eye watering. For some fuel economy and tax rates are the only thing of importance. A few years back I had s nice wee 1.25 Fiesta up for sale and despite being particularly nice I was struggling to move it as every person who called rejected the wee car as it fell into the £120 tax bracket, narrowly missing the Lower £20 rate. The high mileage very tatty Pug 207 diesel I took in part-ex however sold almost instantly and would’ve over and over twenty times had I ready supply of them as it was £20 to tax and did 60mpg. The lass who bought it turned up with two ‘knowledgeable’ chaps to look it over, I informed them of every fault I could find on it and left them to decide for themselves on the understanding that at £550 it was sold as seen and I didn’t want them to darken my driveway again. If they had any doubts or were unhappy at all I’d call the next person on the list. They happily bought and drive off only to complain a month later when the clutch cable snapped. A minor fault which she said she’d been quoted £800 to fix! Idiocy and dishonesty know no bounds with Joe (or Jane) Punter.

It still amazes me how so many people doing low annual mileages baulk at paying an extra £100 (or even £200 as I currently do) in VED to buy or keep an older car that is otherwise in perfectly serviceable condition, yet doesn't bat an eyelid at shelling out £15k, £25k or much more for an EV that might save them £750 a year in fuel and VED, which would take them (including taking into account all other costs) best part of 25 years to possibly recoup, if ever.

Bad enough for most of us, even worse if that person is of pensionable age that they'll likely never see a 'return' of their 'investment'.

In exactly the same vein, I’m amazed how many letters HJ publishes from people who have had their expensive car bought new for almost three years, and they say they are worried that the car will soon start costing money to maintain, so they had better buy a new one, and could he recommend a replacement. And he never ever says “Fer Christ’ sake just hang on to the old one mate/luv, it’ll be much cheaper in the long run”.

I think he used to sometimes in the past, but probably got a lot of negative feedback from those writing in, who obviously want a new car and don't want the 'bother' of having to have repairs done on their existing one, or they just want a change due to personal preference or the lastest fad/fashion (EVs for example), even if sticking with what they've got is far cheaper over the longer term. Rather indicative of today's society, don't you think?

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - alan1302
Rather indicative of today's society, don't you think?

No, I think people have always been happy to get rid of something to get something newer. It happens more now as people on the whole have more money to spend than they did in the past. But I do think if you went back 50 years, doubled someone wages they would buy a lot more new rather than trying to keep things running.

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - Avant
'In exactly the same vein, I’m amazed how many letters HJ publishes from people who have had their expensive car bought new for almost three years, and they say they are worried that the car will soon start costing money to maintain, so they had better buy a new one, and could he recommend a replacement. And he never ever says “For Christ’s sake just hang on to the old one; it’ll be much cheaper in the long run".'

Probably because he recognises that we are all different. Sometimes it may not make much financial sense to buy a new car, but if someone wants one and can afford it, it's not an act of madness to do so. As I've often said, finance is a vital ingredient in any car-buying decision, but it's not the only one.

Some of our regular members, whose views I hugely respect, are mechanically minded and maintain older cars by choice as much as necessity - particularly cars of a vintage not to be saddled with too much electronic trickery. On the other hand, I have a little mechanical knowledge and SWMBO has none, and one of the advantages of being semi-retired instead of completely retired is that we can still buy new cars (on PCPs and the nay-sayers will say we shouldn't do that either). We enjoy them, and as we still do quite a few long trips, we are buying peace of mind. But I certainly don't claim that one view is right and the other is wrong.

Tesla Model 3 - Tesla 3 real-world range - Leif
I don’t have an issue with someone buying new every three years, but he could suggest keeping it if cost is the reason. Some friends change every three years, they like the fixed annual outlay, and get bored of the car. Fair enough.
 

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