1990s Peugeots - Andrew-T

As most of us know, the price of the 205 GTi has ballooned in the last few years; even the surviving lower-level models can still be saleable. The 306 however seems to have almost disappeared, despite being basically an enlarged 205, and much applauded when it appeared, for its roadholding and driveability.

I recently got a Garros version of the 306 with 75K on the clock, owned by a lady for 20 of its 24 years, with a good deal of history. After a bit of fettling it is still a very nice drive with the 1.6 engine and should have several good years ahead of it. Will the 306 make a comeback like the 205, or is the cachet missing?

1990s Peugeots - badbusdriver

I think you have probably hit the nail on the head re cachet. As good a car as the 306 is, and objectively a better car than the 205, it just doesn't have the same cachet.

Certain versions, such as the GTI 6 and the Rallye, will probably go up in value, but it is doubtful they will ever get as high as the 205 GTI. So the 'less desirable' specs certainly won't, though they may increase slightly. It is the classic 'hot hatches' where the big money is to be made, where folk (usually men) growing up in the 80's, lusting after cars like the 205 and Golf GTI, now have the money to indulge in the same way that a couple of generations ago, it was cars like the MGBGT. But none of those buyers will have lusted after a lower spec version, so they will never reach the same prices. There is a 205XR on Ebay with 4k miles from new, dry stored, up for £5749. Which is quite a lot of money granted, but probably a quarter of what would be asked for a GTI in that condition with that miles.

1990s Peugeots - Engineer Andy

Ah, those wre the days - I learned to drive in a 205 1.9D, my cousin owned (before he wrote it off spectacularly in a ditch) a GTi 1.9 which drove like the proverbial doo-doo off a shovel. A former neighbour of mine owned a late model 306 - I can't quite remember the sub-model, but it sure looked good. Probably one of the more sporty ones.

1990s Peugeots - Andrew-T

I can't quite remember the sub-model, but it sure looked good. Probably one of the more sporty ones.

My previous car (before the 207SW) was one of the earliest 306 diesels with the then new HDi engine (1999T). I could do the oil and filter changes myself with just a pair of ramps, tho the fixings on the sump guard seized after a few years and needed a DiY replacement. It gave me 55mpg and very little trouble.

I also had a purple cabrio with the 2-litre for a while, very posy.

1990s Peugeots - FP

I had a 306 HDi - my one and only diesel car - and loved it. Though it felt (and probably was) a heavy lump to drive, it was glued to the road and just went where you pointed it.

Reliable apart from two predictable items: lights/indicator control stalk and wiper motor.

With two cambelt changes I took it to well beyond 100,000 and it felt as if it could go on for ever.

1990s Peugeots - Bilboman

Back then IIRC Peugeot used to make their own shock absorbers, so had complete control over the whole suspension setup and consequently the driving experience. Then the accountants appear to have taken over - or was it the designers? - with the "ugly" and "uglier" iterations of the 308 and then finally sense and style returned and the cracking new 308 put Peugeot back where it belonged.
Despite having bags of oomph and a pretty well sorted chassis the 309 GTi seems to have faded into obscurity, even across the Channel where there was a 16 valve version.

1990s Peugeots - concrete

When i was in receipt of company cars I had a couple of Peugeots, the 4 series though. Very good, comfortable and reliable cars. It did seem a pity that they lost that reputation for a few years but now they are back with a vengeance! Top of the JD Power reliability survey, who would have thought? Anyway, in the Seventies, working in North Africa and the Middle East our main workhorses were Landrovers for general duties and Peugeot pick up vans based on the equivalent saloon model. The early 4 series I think. These things were virtually indestructible. No proper roads half the time and they coped magnificently. Column gear change with a bench seat so you squeeze in an extra body. Great vehicles and probably a good testing ground for the engineers to develop things. Built for French farmers to abuse so pretty tough.

Cheers Concrete

1990s Peugeots - Theophilus

Anyway, in the Seventies, working in North Africa and the Middle East our main workhorses were Landrovers for general duties and Peugeot pick up vans based on the equivalent saloon model. The early 4 series I think. These things were virtually indestructible. No proper roads half the time and they coped magnificently.

Funny she should post that Concrete - I well remember the 7 seater 404 "Matatus" in Kenya in the 1970s - as you say they went almost anywhere & took any amount of punishment.

But - even more of a coincidence, yesterday I saw an old 404 pickup being driven along the street in a small village here in the south of France - looked as though it had earned its living over the last 40-50 years and still going strong!

1990s Peugeots - Bromptonaut

Ah, those wre the days - I learned to drive in a 205 1.9D,

I got an F reg 205XLD c1996 when we could no longer manage with just on car. Think it was a 1.7.

Obviously it was nowhere near a GTi for 0-60 but was no slouch 30-50 or 50-70. The XLD great fun to hustle along the 'lanes' route from here to Banbury.

1990s Peugeots - Clar1873
I have fond memories of both the 309 and 306. I joined the Police in 1992 and initially drove the petrol (1.3?) 309 - I always liked it, but others didn’t. I can recall the car would lean in corners at speed. When we got the first 306 models in 1994, they were the naturally aspirated diesel. Lovely to drive albeit a bit clattery ( to be expected). Not overly powerful but we thought they were a great car. I can remember the garage foreman saying that the 306 was the best beat car by far - reliable, well built and easy to repair ! The only negative I remember was that the drivers seat base would collapse after a while, no doubt due to the 24 hour use. You’re right though, they seem to be a bit thin on the ground now and I would love to own a good one that’s been cherished.
1990s Peugeots - bazza

I remember driving a MK1 focus across Wales and a few days later a 306. The Peugeot was at least as good as the focus to drive despite the huge fanfare about how much a leap forward the ford was. Shortly after I owned a Citroen ZX 1.9, an identical car under the bodywork and one of my favourites.

1990s Peugeots - SLO76
It’s largely the sporty versions which attain valuable classic status, even the 205 is of limited worth financially unless it’s a GTi, XS or very rare Rallye.

As with most hot hatches from the 90’s 306 GTi-6, XSi and D turbos are all fetching strong money if nice and will only continue to increase as numbers dwindle.

I absolutely loved these, even the basic 1.4 was a joy to drive as long as the PAS option box had been ticked. They were nimble yet comfortable, practical and reliable yet always fun. The Ford Focus Mk I was the only car of its time to beat it but I’d favour the 306 in sporty versions with Ford’s ST170 a bit of a letdown.

Drive it, preserve it and enjoy it. It’s unlikely to ever be worth a fortune but it’ll be depreciation free and fun. What’s not to like?
1990s Peugeots - veloceman
The 309 Gti was a far better car than the 205Gti, just didn’t have the looks.
Interesting that older Peugeot’s don’t rust anywhere nearly as badly as other cars of the era.
I had a 306XT (1.8) as a company car. I can honestly say it’s the best handling/riding car I ever had.
1990s Peugeots - Lee Power

I have many fond memories about 20 years back of my 405 leaving Foci for dust down the twisty country road on the way to work.

The 405 was a fine riding excellent go kart, it just went where you pointed it.

1990s Peugeots - SLO76
The 309 Gti was a far better car than the 205Gti, just didn’t have the looks. Interesting that older Peugeot’s don’t rust anywhere nearly as badly as other cars of the era. I had a 306XT (1.8) as a company car. I can honestly say it’s the best handling/riding car I ever had.

The 309 was the odd one out in the Peugeot 80’s/90’s range because it was designed to be a Talbot, the replacement for the Horizon but PSA killed the firm off and it got a Peugeot badge instead. Good cars especially the GTi and the diesels both of which were miles ahead of rivals in almost every way. But the 306 was almost perfect. The 1.9 turbo diesel XR/XT was a fantastic family car. Loads of go, 50mpg economy, 250,000 capability and brilliant handling and ride. Where did Peugeot go wrong? The 307 that followed was such a disappointment. I tried a new 307 2.0 HDi Rapier not long after they came out with a view to hopefully buying but I absolutely hated the way it drove and ended up with a used BMW 318 Ci instead which was woefully unreliable.
1990s Peugeots - Andrew-T

<< Where did Peugeot go wrong? The 307 that followed was such a disappointment. >>

So was the 206. The only one I owned was a Garros version, which I kept for a couple of months including trips to Devon and Scotland. Got rid because the seats became uncomfortable after about half an hour - something that could never be said of those in a 205 or 306.

1990s Peugeots - SLO76
Yeah, the 206 was disappointing too. Ditto the 407, 308, 408 etc etc etc. But the firm paid the price as their cars which commanded a slight premium over rivals before started selling only on price and they eventually went bust. It was only a restructuring deal with government and Chinese money that saved it and thanks to current boss turned it around. I’m itching for a shot in the latest 208 and 508 to see if they’ve really returned to form.
1990s Peugeots - corax

<< Where did Peugeot go wrong? The 307 that followed was such a disappointment. >>

So was the 206. The only one I owned was a Garros version, which I kept for a couple of months including trips to Devon and Scotland. Got rid because the seats became uncomfortable after about half an hour - something that could never be said of those in a 205 or 306.

Strange, isn't it, how manufacturers change the seat design as well as the car. The human shape doesn't change, so why? If a seat shape is comfortable, keep to it. For example, shortening the front seat squabs to allow more legroom at the back is robbing Peter to pay Paul, considering the driver is always going to be the one using the front seat and needs the comfort.

1990s Peugeots - Bilboman

I idly wonder to myself whether there would be any interest in grey imports of Peugeots not destined for Western Europe. The 301 seems popular in Greece, as one example, so theoretically could be imported into France or Spain (where it is actually made but not officially sold!) and would theoretically be covered by a EU wide warranty. RHD 408 modes were made in Malaysia - would any of them have ended up in the UK or Ireland?
Just wondering.

 

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