Peugeot 308 SW - Battery completely dead - Alex Kyriacos

I think I know the answer to this question already but it's always good to ask. My car is a ten year old 308sw diesel.

Unlocked my car with the remote, got in, turned the ignition - one click and - not even a flicker of power. No interior light, no radio, definitely no engine turn. My question is, if this is the battery, wouldn't it have died a slower death - ie; given me lighting etc but not enough juice for the engine? Or is this a bad cell in the battery? Or is it something else?

For a car that has not cost me very much in upkeep during nearly ten years, this will be the third battery. I think it is only a couple of years old - is that acceptable?

Thanks for your time.

Peugeot 308 SW - Battery completely dead - elekie&a/c doctor
Car batteries can die at any time . At 2 years old it seems a bit premature. I would get it tested properly. If it is a no-name make ,then I would not be surprised.
Peugeot 308 SW - Battery completely dead - Railroad.

We might like to think of a battery as 'has failed' but they can actually fail for a number of reasons. Depending on how it has failed will give varying symptoms and test results. The solution however is always the same. It needs replacing.

Peugeot 308 SW - Battery completely dead - sammy1

Have you checked the obvious ie the terminals, weather not that cold to kill it without warning but does happen.

Peugeot 308 SW - Battery completely dead - Peter.N.

Check the voltage across that battery, it can still read around 12v if its flat, you need a load on it to test it properly. If you switch the lights on and it drops much or try to engage the starter and it drops to a much lower voltage then its flat - or as mentioned has a poor connection somewhere.

It could be of course that either something is draining it or the alternator is not charging properly, if you can get it started it should read about 14.4 volts if its OK.

Peugeot 308 SW - Battery completely dead - paul 1963

This happened to me years ago with a Mondeo, drove it first thing and it was fine, went back out to it later and it was completely dead, I first suspected the starter motor and it was only a neighbour with a meter showing the battery at fault that stopped me changing it...

Peugeot 308 SW - Battery completely dead - galileo

This happened to me years ago with a Mondeo, drove it first thing and it was fine, went back out to it later and it was completely dead, I first suspected the starter motor and it was only a neighbour with a meter showing the battery at fault that stopped me changing it...

Years ago I had this with a Hillman Imp, started first thing and drove to the shops, got in with the shopping,, turned the key, dead. One cell of six had failed, bump started and went straight to the factors for a new battery

Peugeot 308 SW - Battery completely dead - Andrew-T

Going through 3 batteries in 10 years suggests that there may be a fault somewhere. My 2008 Pug 207SW diesel is still starting on its original battery, perhaps a bit less enthusiastically than 10 years back, but I never need to crank twice. I do count myself rather lucky, but that's how it is.

I have used the recommended procedure to reconnect the battery a couple of years back - you could try that (after testing the battery itself).

Peugeot 308 SW - Battery completely dead - edlithgow

At the risk of being obvious..um..I'd try charging it with a battery charger, which no one seems to have mentioned.

If it wont accept a charge its a fair bet its had it. If it will then it may be OK or on its last legs but in either case you can use it to check your in-car charging system and then load test the battery with the headlights. Lots of descriptions and video's on't nyet

Before I did that I'd look inside the cells to see if they have the correct level of electrolyte and top them off if they havn't.

I buy trad batteries with screw caps for indiv cells, but some have a press fit cover that can with varying difficulty be prized off to give access. Don't like them so much.

If its a sealed "maintenance free" battery you will not be able to check the cells, and you shouldn't have bought one.

You can measure the voltage per cell with a multimeter using disposable probes (maybe coat hangar wire), and the SG with a hydrometer, which may tell you which cell is bad, but I dont find it very useful information.

There are various claims for ways to stretch battery life with chemicals and/or pulse-charging, but I dunno if there's anything in them. Charging and discharging cycling sometimes seems to dislodge some sulphation and buy a bit of time

Peugeot 308 SW - Battery completely dead - Gibbo_Wirral

Get the alternator checked. I've known a few stop regulating and push too much current back to the battery.

If your car is going through batteries, that would be my first culprit.

Edited by Gibbo_Wirral on 11/01/2019 at 12:36

Peugeot 308 SW - Battery completely dead - Andrew-T

Before I did that I'd look inside the cells to see if they have the correct level of electrolyte and top them off if they havn't.

There aren't many batteries you can look inside these days, I think.

Peugeot 308 SW - Battery completely dead - Simon

My guess will be cheap and nasty batteries being fitted.

Peugeot 308 SW - Battery completely dead - edlithgow

Before I did that I'd look inside the cells to see if they have the correct level of electrolyte and top them off if they havn't.

There aren't many batteries you can look inside these days, I think.

All the more reason to seek out those where you can, as I said above.

If they aren't available AT ALL in the Yook now (still available here, or at least they were a year or so ago when I bought my last one) then you've only yourselves to blame.

If people didn't buy crap, they wouldn't be able to sell it.

Peugeot 308 SW - Battery completely dead - Andrew-T

<< If they aren't available AT ALL in the Yook now (still available here, or at least they were a year or so ago when I bought my last one) then you've only yourselves to blame. If people didn't buy crap, they wouldn't be able to sell it. >>

It's easy to make assumptions and slag off, Ed, from the other side of the globe - where I imagine just as much 'crap' is available. But as I said above, my OEM battery, which I can't look inside, is still starting my car after almost 11 years.

My conclusion is that batteries can now be made which don't need to be looked inside. Those with fiddly little caps are more likely to lose water by evaporation, so they DO need to be looked inside [don't know where the hydrogen leaks off though ...]

Peugeot 308 SW - Battery completely dead - edlithgow

<< If they aren't available AT ALL in the Yook now (still available here, or at least they were a year or so ago when I bought my last one) then you've only yourselves to blame. If people didn't buy crap, they wouldn't be able to sell it. >>

It's easy to make assumptions and slag off, Ed, from the other side of the globe - where I imagine just as much 'crap' is available. But as I said above, my OEM battery, which I can't look inside, is still starting my car after almost 11 years.

My conclusion is that batteries can now be made which don't need to be looked inside. Those with fiddly little caps are more likely to lose water by evaporation, so they DO need to be looked inside [don't know where the hydrogen leaks off though ...]

Actually, in my experience its just as easy to slag off and make assumptions from the other side of the room.

Easier. You don't have to type.

People do sometimes throw things at you, though.

I'll admit to a general predjudice in favor of maintainable rather then maintenance free "sealed for life" stuff, so, in a battery context, describing maintenance-free as a Compromised Rechargeable Automotive Powerstore (CRAP) is an assumption, since I havn't seen any actual comparative data on life span when properly maintained.

One would think it should be out there, but vested interest and advertising may intervene to prevent it.

Best I could find from a quick look was this:-

autosystempro.com/maintenance-free-batteries/

Not actual data, and they dont seem to be able to spell "The" but no obvious BS, which is not the rule on the internyet. Their Pro-Con listing goes:-

Hie advantages of maintenance-free batteries over conventional batteries include:

A larger reserve of electrolyte above the plates. [I wonder why? Oh wait, you NEED it, don't you?]

Increased resistance to overcharging. [That's good, though only relevent if you've got a charging fault]

Longer shelf life (approximately 18 months). [OK]

Ability to be shipped with electrolyte installed, reducing the possibility of accidents and injury to the technician. [Bit harsh, but that is not my problem]

Higher cold cranking amps rating. [No cold-cranking 'ere mate. Maybe slightly chilly cranking very occaisionally]

Hie major disadvantages of the maintenance-free battery include:

Grid growth when the battery is exposed to high temperatures. [ Here on the other side of the globe, high temperatures are not unknown]

Inability to withstand deep cycling. [ I use the car infrequently, though I do sometimes charge between use, so deep cycling is a possibility]

Low reserve capacity. [Doesn't sound good, though offhand I'm not sure exactly what it means. I'd have thought it was a function of the specification rather than the technology. Maybe they mean for a given size or weight]

Faster discharge by parasitic loads.[I don't have any of them, but I bet y'all do]

Shorter life expectancy.[NOT GOOD]

Now the last one conflicts with your experience, (I'd think 11 years was rather exceptional) so either:-

(a) the above is t*** (its The Internyet, after all),

(b) the above is outdated,

(c) you've been especially lucky with your battery.

I dunno, maybe a bit of (b) + (c), but there's enough predjudice-confirmation above to keep me buying the maintainable type for a bit longer, while they're still available.

They're a bit cheaper too.

Edited by edlithgow on 12/01/2019 at 11:11

Peugeot 308 SW - Battery completely dead - edlithgow

I had a look on "Battery University" for some better info, but its a bit inconsistent/unclear.

batteryuniversity.com/index.php/learn/article/lead...s

Sometimes they equate maintenance-free and/or sealed batteries with Absorbant Glass Mat and Gel types, implying those are the main alternatives to the "conventional" battery, and that's what "sealed" means, but elsewhere they refer to sealed flooded lead acid starter batteries, which is what I was thinking of and assumed was referred to above.

Since the above doesn't actually specify the technology, this may be incorrect.

 

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