Any - Stop yer beeping. - argybargy

Driving from North Wales to my son's gaff in Cheshire the other day, I was followed for much of the way by a chap in a 4x4.

He got a bit close occasionally, but never actually tailgated for more than a few seconds at a time, soon dropping back when he realised I wouldn't break the speed limit to allow him to make more progress.

At one point we arrived at a set of traffic lights where there was a give way to the left which you could negotiate after checking for vehicles moving on a green light to your right. Someone clearly not familiar with the junction had stopped at this give way in front of me, perhaps confused by the absence of a filter light. As soon as I stopped, the 4x4 man behind me beeped loudly, twice, without giving this befuddled driver a single second's more time to work things out. I was mildly annoyed because if it was anyone's turn to beep it was mine, and it felt as if he was beeping me as well for failing to beep the confused driver the instant I arrived at the junction. Being a placid soul I was willing to give them time to work it out before moving on. The confused driver lurched forward and we followed, with a bit more tailgating to come before 4x4 guy turned off.

Question being much wider than this incident itself. Are folks more impatient on the roads nowadays, and if so, why? Is it a symptom of the need for instant gratification/ progress across society in general? Is it because roads are much busier?

Edited by argybargy on 19/06/2018 at 10:54

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Dogfuzz

Definitely. My observation is that there are particular times/examples that should be noted

1) Most of any friday afternoon, but particulary testosterone fueled between 17.00 and 18.00

2) The 20 minutes BEFORE school ending AT 15.30'ish, drivers of 4x4s and SUVs most guilty

2) Sunday -between 11.30 am and 14.00. It calms down after people have their sunday dinner

3) Any time there is an international football fixture

4) Builders/painters/plumbers white vans at any time of the day or night.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - John F

It is an example of the incivility which lurks at varying depths in many of us, being particularly shallow and violent beneath the thin layer of affected politesse sometimes displayed by the BPD chav. Extreme examples can escalate to road rage murder, e.g. the notorious Kenneth Noye case.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Andrew-T

I suspect some of it comes from unfortunate delivery drivers or couriers, who have probably been held up in traffic and are finding it steadily harder to make all their drops before knocking-off time. I would likely feel the same way in their position.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Leif

Where I live people are mostly very good. But yes when I go to busy areas, tempers fray and fuses are shorter. And of course during the evening rush hour, people can be irritable due no doubt to a day at work. Generally young men in vans are impatient and sometimes aggressive, though some vans are annoyingly slow.

The best antidote is a cumfy car, with a nice audio system including AirPlay or the Android equivalent. I can't be doing with the dipsticks and give them a wide berth as and when possible. Or I ignore them if possible.If someone tailgates, I slow down to make sure I can brake more slowly if necessary. Ironic really!

And remember that we all make mistakes, so a little patience is worthwhile (not that I'm saying you don't have patience).

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Ethan Edwards

Essex Audi have a new model. The Audi Enema. To be found three inches from the rear bumper of cars all over the county.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - bolt

Are folks more impatient on the roads nowadays

Yes they are, specialy around my area, outskirts of London and with the roadworks going on causing miles of traffic jams, its getting worse

two lots of works with traffic control within a mile or so is bound to cause frustration, shows when motors will not stop for the red light,ie a dozen or so motors dodge the red and those coming the opposite way are stuck untill they have gone

another annoying part is those going round local roundabout, as most use inside lane then cut drivers up in correct lane, but the ones in wrong lane hoot and gesture the correct lane users...talk about mad world

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Gibbo_Wirral

My bubear at the moment are those who check their phones while waiting at a red light.

The light changes and their delay in putting down the phone, putting the car in gear, taking the handbrake off and setting off means 1 or 2 cars or more don't get through.

Edited by Gibbo_Wirral on 19/06/2018 at 13:32

Any - Stop yer beeping. - nellyjak

Impatience has inceased I'm sure.....getting from A to B as quickly as possible seems to be the overriding mantra these days..and woebetide anyone who gets in the way.

I'm unapologetically old skool...I still see driving as a privilege and a skill to be learnt and constantly honed. I doubt many would agree nowadays....it's a different world out there.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Alby Back
There is something amusingly primitive about it all, and it seems to be related to vehicle size. If I'm driving my son's Aygo, it's not at all uncommon for other road users to try to "bully" me. When I'm in my wife's Qashqai, it happens less frequently, and when I'm in my E Class estate it almost never happens.

Now the only appreciable difference in those vehicles is their size, but something in the primitive psyche of some other drivers seems subjectively, to make them more inclined to try to dominate the small one.

My reaction in all cases is to ignore them.
Any - Stop yer beeping. - nailit
There is something amusingly primitive about it all, and it seems to be related to vehicle size. If I'm driving my son's Aygo, it's not at all uncommon for other road users to try to "bully" me. When I'm in my wife's Qashqai, it happens less frequently, and when I'm in my E Class estate it almost never happens. Now the only appreciable difference in those vehicles is their size, but something in the primitive psyche of some other drivers seems subjectively, to make them more inclined to try to dominate the small one. My reaction in all cases is to ignore them.

Good point, this applies if you ride a motorcycle or bicycle, very sad to contemplate.

Like the new audi model :-) mentioned above.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - argybargy
There is something amusingly primitive about it all, and it seems to be related to vehicle size. If I'm driving my son's Aygo, it's not at all uncommon for other road users to try to "bully" me. When I'm in my wife's Qashqai, it happens less frequently, and when I'm in my E Class estate it almost never happens. Now the only appreciable difference in those vehicles is their size, but something in the primitive psyche of some other drivers seems subjectively, to make them more inclined to try to dominate the small one. My reaction in all cases is to ignore them.

I've noticed that phenomenon also.

Whilst driving bigger cars that I've owned in the past, I was rarely tailgated, and you just felt that others on the road gave you more leeway. On the other hand, driving my wife's Nova or Mini, even as far back as the early 90s, seemed to make me a magnet for finger wagging, gesturing, gratuitiously beeping arrashooles.

Maybe folks assume that the smaller the car, the less likely that the person behind the wheel might prove an intimidating foe. Its a dangerous assumption. I've known a number of men of relatively small stature who drove very large cars, so its probably the case that some large people drive small ones.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - bolt

so its probably the case that some large people drive small ones

there are several very large people that drive small cars in my road, and they do get annoyed with others that tailgate because they should know that the small cars they drive take a while to progress being small engined cars

they have also mentioned the Audi, BMWs, and Merc drivers who think they own the road, their words not mine(though I agree with them)!

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Bilboman

A cunning and totally aggression-free anti-tailgating tactic of mine is to tilt the interior mirror down just low enough so that Chummy behind can't actually make eye contact with me, although I can see his car. Like most forms of bullying, when the aggressor gets absolutely no response, and finds there is no alternative strategy, he tends to either give up or else engage in a screaming rage with himself. Zero eye contact and music to drown out any beeping add to the tranquility. A friend of mine specialises in making a brief glance in the direction of the bullying driver just as the two cars peal off in opposite directions never to cross paths again, offering a huge smile and cheery wave.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - John F

A cunning and totally aggression-free anti-tailgating tactic of mine is to tilt the interior mirror down just low enough.......

I appreciate this is not an option for most, but raising the rear window blind removes much of the unpleasant sensory input of a tailgater, especially when dark. Might even convey a signal of disapproval - as yet I have not pursued the possibility of attaching a salutory message to it.

Many years ago, I graduated from a large cheap rusty old Jaguar XJ6 to a small expensive new Ford Fiesta. As alluded to above, the change in behaviour of other road users was astonishing. I have preferred luxobarges ever since.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - argybargy

A cunning and totally aggression-free anti-tailgating tactic of mine is to tilt the interior mirror down just low enough so that Chummy behind can't actually make eye contact with me, although I can see his car. Like most forms of bullying, when the aggressor gets absolutely no response, and finds there is no alternative strategy, he tends to either give up or else engage in a screaming rage with himself. Zero eye contact and music to drown out any beeping add to the tranquility. A friend of mine specialises in making a brief glance in the direction of the bullying driver just as the two cars peal off in opposite directions never to cross paths again, offering a huge smile and cheery wave.

I had one incident a few weeks ago (pattern emerging here...) where I was tailgated onto the A494 by--yes, youve guessed it--another 4x4. He appeared behind me with lights blazing in the middle of the day and positioned himself just feet from my rear bumper as I overtook another car. We were doing about 65mph. No suggestion of waiting until I'd completed the overtake to give me time to move over. Oh no.

. I didn't move to the inside lane for a good 30 seconds, because it occured to me that he shouldn't be easily rewarded for such aggression (and there was probably some foolish pride at work there also.). Eventually I had to make way, because he remained dangerously close. I blew a raspberry as he came alongside me, though not making eye contact and continuing to look forward, and almost unbelievably, he moved over straight away and cut me up. I leaned on my pathetic horn and waved the fist, his hand came out of the window ( it wasn't a cheery wave) and after a brief exchange of uncomplimentary gestures he disappeared into the distance like a rocket fuelled by petulance.

Not my finest hour, I agree, but far less his. That cretin could easily have caused a serious accident, and for what?

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Leif

I've only been tailgated once while overtaking - a very dangerous move since it removes the option of cancelling the overtake - and it scared me witless.

I used to respond with a gesture to such people. However, these people are thick as poop, and do not realise they are in the wrong. They just think I am a bad driver because I'm getting in their way, and I'm not driving fast enough. A rude gesture will simply enrage them, which will make their already dangerous driving even worse, as they now have even less attention on the road ahead. And of course if I get angry, then my driving will suffer. Best let Mr/Ms NutJob overtake and have an accident elsewhere.

Many years ago I gave a finger to a tailgater. He overtook, then pulled in and braked sharply. Such people are best avoided completely.

Many years ago a then friend stopped at lights and had words with a nut job who was tailgeting him. He was promptly beaten up by the occupants of the car who were criminal gang members. And of course there is Kenneth Noye ...

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Josh Fisher

Best way to be hahaha.

Nothing more fun than grinning and waving to an angry tailgater!

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Leif

they have also mentioned the Audi, BMWs, and Merc drivers who think they own the road, their words not mine(though I agree with them)!

I've always assumed that the Deutshe Uber Barges are company cars, and the arrogant drivers are salesmen (usually if not always the bad drivers are men) and middle managers.

Highish end sports cars such as Jaguars and Porsches usually keep their distance.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - kerbed enthusiasm
There is something amusingly primitive about it all, and it seems to be related to vehicle size. If I'm driving my son's Aygo, it's not at all uncommon for other road users to try to "bully" me. When I'm in my wife's Qashqai, it happens less frequently, and when I'm in my E Class estate it almost never happens. Now the only appreciable difference in those vehicles is their size, but something in the primitive psyche of some other drivers seems subjectively, to make them more inclined to try to dominate the small one. My reaction in all cases is to ignore them.

I've noticed that phenomenon also.

Whilst driving bigger cars that I've owned in the past, I was rarely tailgated, and you just felt that others on the road gave you more leeway. On the other hand, driving my wife's Nova or Mini, even as far back as the early 90s, seemed to make me a magnet for finger wagging, gesturing, gratuitiously beeping arrashooles.

Maybe folks assume that the smaller the car, the less likely that the person behind the wheel might prove an intimidating foe. Its a dangerous assumption. I've known a number of men of relatively small stature who drove very large cars, so its probably the case that some large people drive small ones.

Absolutely. We now have a c3 Picasso. It's obviously not a fast car but it keeps up with the traffic and drifts along lazily enough at 70mph on cruise control. I have never, ever, had so many people cut in front of me or overtake so recklessly and needlessly. I don't know whether the drivers that do so are acting out of presumption, poor observation or ego.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - kerbed enthusiasm

Argybargy - "like a rocket fuelled by petulance". Beautifully put.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - mss1tw
There is something amusingly primitive about it all, and it seems to be related to vehicle size. If I'm driving my son's Aygo, it's not at all uncommon for other road users to try to "bully" me. When I'm in my wife's Qashqai, it happens less frequently, and when I'm in my E Class estate it almost never happens. Now the only appreciable difference in those vehicles is their size, but something in the primitive psyche of some other drivers seems subjectively, to make them more inclined to try to dominate the small one. My reaction in all cases is to ignore them.

If it helps, I drive an (Old, non flashy) 4x4 and generally let little or unpresumptuous cars go.

A couple of times when being tailgated on a quiet road, I've simply knocked it into neutral and coasted to a stop. No brake testing. No gestures. No shouting. No swearing. Just sat gripping the wheel and staring ahead. Think Michael Douglas in Falling Down. (Although he probably wasn't trying not to grin).

Any - Stop yer beeping. - argybargy
There is something amusingly primitive about it all, and it seems to be related to vehicle size. If I'm driving my son's Aygo, it's not at all uncommon for other road users to try to "bully" me. When I'm in my wife's Qashqai, it happens less frequently, and when I'm in my E Class estate it almost never happens. Now the only appreciable difference in those vehicles is their size, but something in the primitive psyche of some other drivers seems subjectively, to make them more inclined to try to dominate the small one. My reaction in all cases is to ignore them.

If it helps, I drive an (Old, non flashy) 4x4 and generally let little or unpresumptuous cars go.

A couple of times when being tailgated on a quiet road, I've simply knocked it into neutral and coasted to a stop. No brake testing. No gestures. No shouting. No swearing. Just sat gripping the wheel and staring ahead. Think Michael Douglas in Falling Down. (Although he probably wasn't trying not to grin).

During my first few years of driving I drove a series of pretty low powered cars, and often found it necessary to pull over on fast country roads (when safe to do so) to allow quicker vehicles to pass. I didn't mind that because I knew they could make better progress, and still do it legally. But the buffoons you encounter nowadays do not inspire a generous response. They just get your back up and make you want to teach them some patience.

Aside from sticking to the speed limit and refusing to make any eye contact, I've struggled to get creative with tailgaters. The tactic you describe above is tempting, but it would need to come with ear defenders.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - dan86

On one of my previous cars I think it was my suzuki swift I wired in a switch so that I could make the break lights come on without touching the breaks. Was great for when someone was tailgating, they would slam on the breaks whilst I would speed away.

That was in my youthful days now i just ignore them and stick to the speed limit knowing it's winding them up.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - mss1tw

During my first few years of driving I drove a series of pretty low powered cars, and often found it necessary to pull over on fast country roads (when safe to do so) to allow quicker vehicles to pass. I didn't mind that because I knew they could make better progress, and still do it legally. But the buffoons you encounter nowadays do not inspire a generous response. They just get your back up and make you want to teach them some patience.

Aside from sticking to the speed limit and refusing to make any eye contact, I've struggled to get creative with tailgaters. The tactic you describe above is tempting, but it would need to come with ear defenders.

Put the hazards on and feign a breakdown if you get worried about anything.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - TheGentlemanThug

Drivers are absolutely getting more aggressive, but what I don't understand is what they hope to achieve? If someone tailgates me I certainly won't change my driving style to accommodate their dangerous behaviour, and if our vehicles come to blows then they'll be entirely to blame.

Most tailgaters I come across quickly change their tune when they realise I have a rear-facing dash camera. Smile!

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Sofa Spud

My own observation in over 40 years of driving is that impatience is not really any worse that it was when I started. But because the roads are a somewhat busier nowadays there are probably more opportunities for drivers to display their impatience.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Bromptonaut

Wirst example I've had recently was on Boxing Day last year.

Got about half way from Windermere to Ambleside when we caught up with a 'roadie' cyclist. The road is hugging the side of the lake and is twisty with a pretty much continuous solid white centre line. Cyclist was moving briskly at around 20mph and had sensibly taken a line well out from the kerb. No way I could pass him in safety, never mind legally. Following Range Rover type vehicle repeatedly blew his horn at me to try and prompt an overtake.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Alby Back
You don't have to react at all to a vehicle behind you. You are (possibly) their problem, but they are not yours. If they are irritating you then just pull over and let them go by, or go round a roundabout twice or something. No need to let them spoil your day when they could be spoiling someone else's. ;-)
Any - Stop yer beeping. - corax
You don't have to react at all to a vehicle behind you. You are (possibly) their problem, but they are not yours. If they are irritating you then just pull over and let them go by, or go round a roundabout twice or something. No need to let them spoil your day when they could be spoiling someone else's. ;-)

Exactly. It's what I do if someone is hovering from my rear bumper. That way you haven't done anything silly which may make them drive more erratically (and cause a danger), and you are rid of them. Stay calm and keep the blood pressure down.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - alan1302

I always look at it that I want the idiot driver away in front of me to will allow them to get by ASAP even if I have to pull over.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Avant

Indeed - this is just a matter of what the police used to call (may still do) 'defensive driving': keeping out of trouble is more important than asserting rights.

I know our local Dorset lanes well; but I didn't know some of the narrow lanes in Cornwall and Devon where we've just been. I was happy to pull over and let someone past who was probably a local.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Leif
I’ve pulled over several times when I felt threatened by someone behind me. There’s no point arguing with them, they probably think they are an expert driver and I’m a mimser. Hi ho.
Any - Stop yer beeping. - Engineer Andy

Especially if said following driver has either a bunch of mates itching to kick the living daylights out of you at the slightest insult or the driver has a baseball bat for company and is looking for trouble. Quite a lot of those people about these days sadly, and not always as easily identifiable as we may think either.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Leif
I had one nutter undertake me (I thought I was in the correct lane for turning right), then stop. When I was near him, he started again, then veered sharply to the right, coming within inches of me. I believe he wanted to scare me into swerving into the central reservation barriers. An hour later I was still shaking and wound up. You have to wonder what sort of people do such things.

Maybe it’s age, I’m 54, but I can’t be bothered responding to nut jobs. Then again, people down here are generally good polite drivers.
Any - Stop yer beeping. - bolt
I had one nutter undertake me (I thought I was in the correct lane for turning right), then stop. When I was near him, he started again, then veered sharply to the right, coming within inches of me. I believe he wanted to scare me into swerving into the central reservation barriers. An hour later I was still shaking and wound up. You have to wonder what sort of people do such things. Maybe it’s age, I’m 54, but I can’t be bothered responding to nut jobs. Then again, people down here are generally good polite drivers.

I had someone undertake me using a long bus lane on the A224 in Cray, in an old Rover 25, I thought they were parking in the bus stop as some do sometimes, but no they were undertaking, never seen that before and narrowly missed my N/s front wing as they shot in front of me...I thought I`d seen it all....seems not!

whoever it was, their passengers were young and waving England flags out the windows?

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Leif
That’s fairly common in parts of London. Hi ho. :)
Any - Stop yer beeping. - hillman

When anyone who tailgates or beeps me I have practice of continuing until I reach a clear stretch of road, to signal stop and pulling over to let them pass. It sometimes causes a bit of misunderstanding with anybody following them. They are disconcerted when I resume progress. Sometimes I have to let a stream of traffic pass me. To make things clear I am keeping the speed limit for the road. I am not a slow driver.

I adopted the practice when a very experienced friend told me he did it. Once, he told me, the beeper was a young man and his mate in another car was following him. In such circumstances young men seem to drive faster. When my friend pulled over the one following my friend cut in front of him closely followed by the 'mate'. The one who was first made it safely but the second one hit the bus.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - argybargy

When anyone who tailgates or beeps me I have practice of continuing until I reach a clear stretch of road, to signal stop and pulling over to let them pass. It sometimes causes a bit of misunderstanding with anybody following them. They are disconcerted when I resume progress. Sometimes I have to let a stream of traffic pass me. To make things clear I am keeping the speed limit for the road. I am not a slow driver.

I adopted the practice when a very experienced friend told me he did it. Once, he told me, the beeper was a young man and his mate in another car was following him. In such circumstances young men seem to drive faster. When my friend pulled over the one following my friend cut in front of him closely followed by the 'mate'. The one who was first made it safely but the second one hit the bus.

Pulling over, when safe to do so, was my default response to tailgating in the days when I tended to own cars with the power output of the average grass strimmer.

When tailgated, its tempting to tootle along at or just below the speed limit, with the occasional glance in the mirror at the arm waving and hand signals, flashing lights, horns and the rest of the portfolio routinely employed by the average road using Neanderthal, rather than spoiling the fun by pulling over.

But yes, these are people whose temperament on the road massively increases the chances that one day, they'll end up in a ditch, head on with another vehicle or wrapped round a tree. No point in winding them up and increasing the chances of sharing their fate.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - Bilboman

I've always thought it "good practice" to let the speedsters get past and on their way whenever it is safe to let them do so. Years ago in Spain large lorries on winding single carriage roads would use first a green "I've seen you" rear-mounted light and then the nearside indicator to say "I'm slowing down, it's safe to pass" - something the driver of a smaller vehicle would not be able to decide unaided - but flicking the offside indicator, logically, meant "danger - do not pass".
There is a rule in the Spanish Highway Code requiring drivers to allow overtakers to overtake by moving as far over as possible to the nearside of their lane and maintaining or reducing speed. Speeding up or otherwise impeding a legitimate overtake is therefore a motoring offence.

Any - Stop yer beeping. - gordonbennet

I've slowed down and let tailgaters past hundreds of times, much rather they caused an accident with someone else instead of me.

Since i've resumed driving Hlux/Landcruisers its no longer an issue, if they get close enough i can't see them anyway and have developed peripheral vision techniques with the mirrors, where i never actually look in any of them when i realise i have a tailgater in a vehicle high enough to be seen or one who hogs the crown of the road 6ft off my back bumper but lacking the wit to overtake normally.

Did have a real idiot on the way home from work across the lanes couple of weeks ago, typical car a hot Golf of some description, i was following 3 others all of us at normal distance and speed,said Golf jammed tight up my back side, he overtook me literally yards from a blind bend going into the village despite clear opportunites before, and overtook the chap in front on the brow of a blind hill departing the same village, didn't see him again but fully expected to be giving him a cheery wave at some point further along when he gets it wrong and ditches the thing, i shall sail by without breaking progress.

 

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