Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - argybargy

A close relative of mine has just purchased a brand new Mazda 6, 2.2 diesel. I haven't clapped eyes on it yet, but he hummed and haahed between the Mazda and a Jag XS, eventually going for the Mazda, I'd like to think, based on my advice regarding the reliability of the brand. Advice which, I hasten to admit, I accumulated not through personal experience, but through reading positive comment about Mazdas on here.

He's blissfully happy with it so far. He tends to hang onto his cars until way beyond the point where they're worth much, previous example being an 8 year old 2.2 petrol Vectra which had about 65k on the clock and which developed a fuel problem that nobody could get to the bottom of without spending more money than the the car was worth. So he traded it in for scrappage on the Mazda.

He's not bothered about depreciation because he'll keep it for years; as above, he always does keep his cars for years. Question being about the advisability of buying a new diesel. Apparently it conforms to Euro 6 emissions, whatever the Hell that is, and he doesn't give a flying flea about the current downer that the car buying public seem to have on diesels. My worry is that for political reasons there will be further sanctions levied on the drivers of diesels to include even the newest and least polluting examples.

With discounts/ scrappage I think he paid 19k; full price was 25k

Good buy, or no?

Edited by argybargy on 01/04/2018 at 11:47

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - FiestaOwner

A close relative of mine has just purchased a brand new Mazda 6, 2.2 diesel. I haven't clapped eyes on it yet, but he hummed and haahed between the Mazda and a Jag XS, eventually going for the Mazda, I'd like to think, based on my advice regarding the reliability of the brand.

You must really hate this relative if you advised them to buy a Mazda Diesel.

Oh, sorry well done. Just realised that it's April 1st.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - skidpan

Hope its an April fools.

If not he had better arrange an overdraft to pay for expensive DPF and engine repairs. 65,000 in 8 years (c. 8000 a year) is not the teritory any buyer should consider any diesel, a Mazda with its known issues should be at the bottom of the list.

For less than he paid there are deals on Skoda making a Superb TSi £16103 at Carfile (after discount and PCP contribution).

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - argybargy

Nope, no April Fool's. He really has bought this car, and in fact, was all set to buy a diesel Jag till I talked him into a Mazda instead ( I didn't specify Mazda diesel, just "Mazda"). I made the necessary noises about the way diesels are now viewed, both by the trade and by the public, and I think he mentioned the DPF thing himself, but he went for it anyhow. Not to worry, he's got plenty of moolah left in the bank to sort out any issues.

So far it looks like the consensus is "whatcha up to, you dope". Any alternative thoughts?

Edited by argybargy on 01/04/2018 at 13:08

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - SLO76
He’s been missold it if he’s not been warned that low mileage use like this isn’t suitable for a DPF equipped diesel. Mazda’s are great cars but the one area they really fall down on is Diesel engines with this motor having a particularly bad reputation for failure. I’d’ve advise buying the 2.0 Skyactiv petrol which is a very good bet for longterm ownership with no turbo or anything complex to worry about.
Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - daveyK_UK
I’m not sure what telling them they have made the right or wrong purchase now it’s been made will achieve?

Problems with Mazda 2.2 Diesel engine is well known in the trade, not much to add.
Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - gordonbennet

I don't suppose all these will suffer the well reported issues.

However i would advise him to monitor the oil level weekly, and any sign of it rising to change the oil pronto.

I'd also be inclined to find the correct oil and buy it 20+ litres at a time when its on offer and to make sure the oil is changed twice a year regardless, this may sound excessive to some but its cheap in the grand scheme of car ownership and should help see a long trouble free life.

It might also be interesting to peruse the Mazda owner forums, see if some bright spark has come up with any software for laptop so the clued up owner could interrogate the car with a view to keeping an eye on the condition of the DPF, and if getting a bit full maybe able to trigger a regen when the owner knows a suitable journey has been undertaken.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Engineer Andy
I’m not sure what telling them they have made the right or wrong purchase now it’s been made will achieve? Problems with Mazda 2.2 Diesel engine is well known in the trade, not much to add.

...and widely reported on this site, especially in the reviews and on the forum. Even I as a fan of the brand and an owner of a (admitedly petrol-driven) Mazda car for 12 (reliable) years wouldn't touch their diesels with a bargepole, even if I was doing 20-25k miles a year - just too much of a risk given the possible financial pitfalls, especially as I tend to keep cars well in excess of 5 years, like the OP's friend.

To me, its no coincidence that a high percentage of the Mazdas from the CX-3/3 and above are either Sport models (ride is way too firm in the longer term on the 18in rims) and/or diesel engined models (both the 1.5 and 2.2 diesels), even taking into account that some are obviously ex-hire cars. Many, especially the diesels amazingly (and continually) turn up at dealerships with low mileage for their age.

I'm just amazed how some people are still taken in by the sales spiel about diesels given how much negative publicity and proven facts about the problems that often occur when they are used for predominantly short distance and/or urban work, even the latest designs which are better than those from a few years ago.

As regards the 'deal' acheived in this case, you only have to look at HJ's broker (new cars) section to find that you can source perfectly decent Mazda 6s with the 2.0 petrol SE-L Nav spec for £16k - £17.5k (depending on whether you spec an auto and/or a tourer) or about £1500 more for the Sport, and that's without any trade-in to offset against the deal. The Skoda skidpan mentioned still is a better deal though - a better engine (presumably the 1.4/1.5 TSi) and bigger, though not quite as good handling.

Still, a petrol-engined car should've been the way to go here - even assuming no problems with any diesel engine, the higher purchase price, normally higher fuel and maintenance costs would likely take well over the decade to pay off, if at all, the difference by the higher fuel economy (again, assuming a reasonable amount of longer trips) of the diesel car.

I think the OP's friend has made a BIG mistake, and will likely pay for it in a big way within a reasonable amount of time.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - KJP 123

I agree that with low annual mileages diesels do not make economic sense, even on quite big cars let alone small cars that do not use much fuel anyway. Also Mazda diesels have a poor reputation.

But a low annual mileage in itself may not be bad for a diesel. Maybe it is used for long trips at the weekend mainly with the owner commuting by train during the week.

I think that SLO76, whose opinion I respect since joining forum, is going a bit strong when he says,

“He’s been missold it if he’s not been warned that low mileage use like this isn’t suitable for a DPF equipped diesel.”

Mis-sold has legal implications. Sure, he has bought the wrong engine but did he tell the dealer his annual mileage and should the dealer have enquired? Quizzing the purchaser is likely to make him walk away; if not to another make but to another Mazda dealer.

Should a Mazda dealer advise that their diesels are not very good or a VAG dealer that some of their dual clutch gearboxes are poor? I understand that they have to be driven differently to traditional torque converter autos; how far does a dealer have to go in assuming the total ignorance of the customer?

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Engineer Andy

I agree that with low annual mileages diesels do not make economic sense, even on quite big cars let alone small cars that do not use much fuel anyway. Also Mazda diesels have a poor reputation.

But a low annual mileage in itself may not be bad for a diesel. Maybe it is used for long trips at the weekend mainly with the owner commuting by train during the week.

I think that SLO76, whose opinion I respect since joining forum, is going a bit strong when he says,

“He’s been missold it if he’s not been warned that low mileage use like this isn’t suitable for a DPF equipped diesel.”

Mis-sold has legal implications. Sure, he has bought the wrong engine but did he tell the dealer his annual mileage and should the dealer have enquired? Quizzing the purchaser is likely to make him walk away; if not to another make but to another Mazda dealer.

Should a Mazda dealer advise that their diesels are not very good or a VAG dealer that some of their dual clutch gearboxes are poor? I understand that they have to be driven differently to traditional torque converter autos; how far does a dealer have to go in assuming the total ignorance of the customer?

It wouldn't suprise me if the buyer just said 'I love diesels for the economy and low tax' and the dealer just stayed schtum. It is true that an honourable salesperson will ask what type of driving the prospective buyer is likely to be doing, but in law, unless they tell a lie or do not reveal something really obvious, especially if the buyer is more concerned about other things, then I suspect they would have no case for mis-selling, or at least less of one than if they asked a straight question or advice about what is better for short trips, etc.

Like people supposedly 'mis-sold' PPI cover, most people lie through their teeth because they know its more likely they didn't ask questions or actually had any issues about the sale at the time - its just 'free money' (compensation) for idiots who can't be bothered to read Ts & Cs and ask questions (getting important answers in writing) about things that could be very costly, etc.

I myself do a low mileage for the most part, 3-5k miles a year on average, but 99% of each journey is 10+ miles, and the vast majority on faster flowing roads. I run a petrol-powered car, so that's no problem, and if they did the same as me, then I agree it would likely lead to a far lower likelihood of serious issues, especially involving the DPF.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - badbusdriver

I remember going into our local Fiat dealer some years ago to enquiring about a doblo 1.3 turbo diesel as a possible next car. I was asked what type of running would be done with the car and when i said mainly short local journeys and certainly less than 5k per year, was told that it would not be a good choice for that, and that the 1.4 petrol would be far more suitable.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - argybargy

Many thanks for the further responses.

It was a Jaguar XF I was referring to, so a car that does exist but which temporarily acquired an air of mystery due to a typo.

I think the best bet is to send him a link to this thread and if he wants to comment he can join the forum and do so.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - SLO76
“Mis-sold has legal implications. Sure, he has bought the wrong engine but did he tell the dealer his annual mileage and should the dealer have enquired?“

Yes it does and yes the dealer should have asked and advised accordingly. They are the (alleged) experts and it does count as misselling if they then sold a product that is unsuitable for the customer. The last two diesels I purchased from dealers, our current Honda CRV and VW Polo were sold correctly by sales staff who enquiried about our usage and in both cases we were told about the DPF and its requirements. In fact Arnold Clark required that we sign a disclaimer explaining that we had been advised about it.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - gordonbennet

A sales bod who interrogated me on my motoring norm would only see the back of me as i stalked out the door.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - SLO76
“A sales bod who interrogated me on my motoring norm would only see the back of me as i stalked out the door.”

I find that rather odd. Why would you be upset by someone trying to be responsible? If you were unaware of the potential problems low mileage use could cause with a DPF (90% of buyers aren’t) then wouldn’t you appreciate it being explained before parting with a lot of money? Why would you be offended by someone asking how many and what sort of miles you did?
Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - badbusdriver
“A sales bod who interrogated me on my motoring norm would only see the back of me as i stalked out the door.” I find that rather odd. Why would you be upset by someone trying to be responsible? If you were unaware of the potential problems low mileage use could cause with a DPF (90% of buyers aren’t) then wouldn’t you appreciate it being explained before parting with a lot of money? Why would you be offended by someone asking how many and what sort of miles you did?

Completely agree SLO, bizzarre atitude. How is a salesman supposed to know if you are aware of the potential problems in doing short low speed journeys in a diesel. I'd imagine there are much more people totally oblivious to the pro's and con's than those who have done a bit of research, and know what they want or need.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Vickster44

Hello- I am the person who bought this car.A lovely brand new gunmetal grey Mazda 2.2 diesel sel-nav. I didn't want a nearly new one, or a petrol one or a pre-registered one or a Skoda.

I am very happy with it so far. I was fully conversant with what I was doing when I bought it, I know about DPF filters and how they can clog if mileages/revs are low,I know that a serious motorway blast is adviseable every month or so to burn off those bits. It is lovely to drive,it has excellent fuel economy ,a punchy torquey motor and so far,everything works. 60k miles, 3 year warranty so if it goes wrong -they can fix it.

So I will watch with interest and see whether my new wheels become a disaster, as some posters seem to predict or whether-as I suspect-I get trouble free motoring into the next few years.

In the meantime-I ought to say hello somewhere on this forum!

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - argybargy

Hello, feller!

Much better to hear the tale from the horse's mouth than expect authoritative representation via someone who bought a Ford Powershift!

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Alby Back
Good looking car the Mazda 6. Stands out from the crowd somehow. I hope you enjoy it Vickster.
Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Engineer Andy

Hello- I am the person who bought this car.A lovely brand new gunmetal grey Mazda 2.2 diesel sel-nav. I didn't want a nearly new one, or a petrol one or a pre-registered one or a Skoda.

I am very happy with it so far. I was fully conversant with what I was doing when I bought it, I know about DPF filters and how they can clog if mileages/revs are low,I know that a serious motorway blast is adviseable every month or so to burn off those bits. It is lovely to drive,it has excellent fuel economy ,a punchy torquey motor and so far,everything works. 60k miles, 3 year warranty so if it goes wrong -they can fix it.

So I will watch with interest and see whether my new wheels become a disaster, as some posters seem to predict or whether-as I suspect-I get trouble free motoring into the next few years.

In the meantime-I ought to say hello somewhere on this forum!

From my limited knowledge, but more by what I've read about what seems more useful is that diesels equipped with DPFs need a decent run on faster moving roads at least once a fortnight, and those most affected (most prone due to the design of the system and exhaust and/or does a lot of short and/or slow speed journeys from cold) once a week. Of course, that means you may need to use more fuel (see below) if the car is actively regenning its DPF as you get to your destination.

None of this 'guarantees' no DPF problems, as the car itself doesn't know when the driver will be doing a longer journey on a fast bit of road (to do an active DPF regen - it just does it when it has to, a bit like empying a bin when its full, rather when its not raining outside), but for those with better DPF systems, doing so will help passively regen the DPF and thus the unit needs less frequent active regens.

As has been said on the forum (but you won't necessarily be aware of yet - check out other threads on this to see more), when you pull up at the 'end' of your journey, don't switch the engine off - open the door, and if you smell a burning smell coming from under the car, it's the DPF actively regening, which means it needs to be driven around for a good few miles more (I'm not an expert on this - other who are can tell you how long - your dealership should anyway) so that the DPF regen can finish and not quickly clog up if you switch the car off before it has done so.

Again, from memory, keep an eye on the oil level in your car, as the Mazda diesel engines suffer from issues related to rising oil levels as well (hopefully someone else can fill you in [or you can do a search on the forum or interweb to check]) - the main 'point of failure' on many of these engines, I think particularly the 2.2TD.

Bear in mind that the warranty WILL NOT likely cover problems associated with inappropriate driving if you don't follow the manufacturer's guidance in the handbook. I would hope Mazda have been good enough to include something like the above about the pitfalls of using diesel-powered cars predominantely for short trips and how to look after the DPF, as not doing so would be a potential financial disaster if sale people kept flogging them to punters who know they are doing that sort of driving. Note also that its a 60k miles or 3 years, whichever comes first, so likely the 3 years in your circumstance.

I can fully understand why you chose the 2.2TD over (say) the 2.0 petrol, as it is far more responsive an engine (I've test driven the 2.0 petrol in the smaller 3 and CX-3 and its ok, but not significantly better than my old 1.6 petrol 3 in performance terms) and, on longer journeys, probably 5-10mpg better than the petrol engine.

Still, best of luck and welcome to the forum, even if you're reading all this 'after the fact'. Let us know how you get on, as that's how we, and eventually (hopefully) the manufacturers get to know how life in the real world of car ownership affects the running and reliability of cars.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Vickster44

Engineer Andy , thank you for a most interesting reply full of good advice :-)

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - argybargy

Yes, much appreciated, Andy.

Far more generous, intelligent and constructive than "is this an April Fools joke", for example.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - skidpan

I am very happy with it so far. I was fully conversant with what I was doing when I bought it, I know about DPF filters and how they can clog if mileages/revs are low,I know that a serious motorway blast is adviseable every month or so to burn off those bits.

All a monthly blast on the motorway will do will be to produce soot that will further block up the dpf and use diesel. Only a regen will clean out the soot and that will be triggered by the ECU when it reads the magic soot loading percentage. Its an urban myth that driving on the motorway will do that. On our Kia and BMW a regen could start at any time, sometimes when driving back from Tesco. And revs has nothing to do with it. Both BMW and Kia recomended between 1800 and 2000 rpm during a regen, in the BMW that was 70 mph in 6th, in the Kia 60 mph in 6th. Reving it higher did not make the regen work faster, it actually slowed it down beacuse the exhaust gas was moving through the matrix to fast to allow it to get upto the 600 degrees required. The optimum revs specified resulted in the quickest regen which wasted less diesel.

It is lovely to drive,it has excellent fuel economy ,a punchy torquey motor and so far,everything works.

You have just described a modern turbo petrol which does not have the issues a modern diesel potentially has.

60k miles, 3 year warranty so if it goes wrong -they can fix it.

No they won't. All manufacturers exclude the exhaust from their warranty unless a manufacturing defect is to blame and the dpf is classed as part of the exhaust. I would expect that virtually all dpf issues are usage related (or misuse by owners who do not understand them) therefore do not expect mazda to be of any help when your problems start.

We had turbo diesels from 1996 to 2015 and loved them. Compared to petrols they drove much better. When dpf's were introduced we looked at petrols but non drove anything like we wanted so we still bought diesels. We probably got away with it bacause my commute was 15 miles each way 3 days a week and the wifes was 20 miles each way 3 days a week. But when we drove the first really good modern turbo petrol (Seat Leon 1.4 TSi) that was it for diesels. The Seat was faster, more refined, more flexible and averaging 45 mpg for almost 4 years very nearly as economical. It was also £2000 cheaper than the equivalent diesel, using Hionest Johns real MPG figures the break even point (taking the lower depreciation of the diesel into account) was over 60,000 miles, far longer than we keep cars these days.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Engineer Andy

he Seat was faster, more refined, more flexible and averaging 45 mpg for almost 4 years very nearly as economical. It was also £2000 cheaper than the equivalent diesel, using Honest Johns real MPG figures the break even point (taking the lower depreciation of the diesel into account) was over 60,000 miles, far longer than we keep cars these days.

...and that's probably not taking into account any expensive issues on a modern diesel that might cost the Earth to fix, if you keep the car after its 5th or 6th birthday. Too many punters these days just look at the mpg only. More fool them for not doing their homework (and it doesn't take that much, with the Interweb and forums such as this to help) at all - just plain lazy. Odd that, given the car is the second most expensive purchase a person will likely ever make in their lifetime.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - skidpan

More fool them for not doing their homework (and it doesn't take that much, with the Interweb and forums such as this to help) at all - just plain lazy. Odd that, given the car is the second most expensive purchase a person will likely ever make in their lifetime.

The calcs only took a few minutes, simple to do school maths.

The same calcs did show that the BMW diesel and Kia Ceed diesel did save us money over 5 years, quite a bit in all honesty but even it they hadn't the petrols were so poor I would not have bought one. With the introduction of the excellent turbo petrol why would anyone risk a diesel over low annual mileage, especially the Mazda with its terrible reputation.

But I would not buy a Mazda petrol, very poor to drive, you need loads of revs to make good progress which can be very tiring. Even Honda have introduced turbo petrols now to replace the lethargic older petrols (type R not included).

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - argybargy

Not everyone trusts internet motoring forums, nor indeed forums of any other kind.

HJ has a good reputation amongst those who use it, but I'd venture to suggest that to most punters who make the decision to buy and go browsing, this just another forum amongst many. It certainly has the same potential pitfalls as those others. Despite its greater gravitas, the standard of advice can still vary greatly, and particularly for a new poster it can take time to work out who is talking authoritative-sounding but worthless flannel and who actually knows what they're on about.

I reckon far more "punters" pass through these forums having accidentally found something that strikes a chord whilst using a search engine, than ever stick around and absorb any of the expertise on offer.

As for MPG, I find it hard to believe that anyone who has been driving for more than a handful of years would buy a car on the strength of nothing else. I've bought badly on more than one occasion, but never because I bought something too frugal.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - skidpan

HJ has a good reputation amongst those who use it

The real mpg for our recent cars has been very close to the HJ figure thus I feel that I ca trust it in calcs. Examples, Leon TSi HJ 44.9vmpg ours about 45 mpg. Ceed CRDi HJ 50.2 mpg ours about 51 mpg. Superb HJ 45.5 mpg ours about 44 mpg. BMW 118d HJ 48.9 mpg ours about 47.5 mpg. Please note that all our figures are calculated and not from the fuel confuser on the dash.

There is however one anomoly. The Note. HJ 44.6 mpg but we are averaging over 49 mpg after 3 years and its still improving after every tankful. It was probably the tightest engine we have ever had, as the miles have increased it has noticably loosened up and the performance and mpg have both improved. Shame its going next month.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Vickster44

Wise words Argy.

Forewarned is forearmed and knowing that the dpf is a prime potential source of trouble means I will use best knowledge running the car in the way that suits it best , taking into account my motoring needs.

To suggest I bought it purely with mpg in mind is just silly frankly. I walked in to the dealer intending to test the petrol but decide I liked the diesel much more. If it blows up so be it but I don't think it will. I've always gone with my gut feeling on every car that I've ever owned and all have given great service.

Time will tell !!

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - FiestaOwner

Hi Vickster44

To be honest, I don't understand why Argy started this thread.

The time for starting this thread was while you were still considering what car to buy.

I think it was a bit rotten to start this thread (and invite you to join it) once you had taken delivery of your car which "He's blissfully happy with it so far". Quote taken from opening post.

Although Mazda diesels do have a reputation, we never know how many are affected. If it's 1 in a 1000 then you'd be really unlucky to have a faulty one. Even 1 in a 100 you'd still be unlucky to have a faulty one. There is an element of luck involved with all car purchases.

I wish you well with your new car and hope you get a lot of pleasure from owning and driving it.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Avant

It's also reasonable to hope that - given that the first problems with Mazda diesels that we heard about concerned cars mad in the mid-2000s - Mazda will have applied some redesign work to the engine in question so as to have sorted out the problem.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - pd

Out of the last 200-300 or so cars I have bought and sold with about 80% of them probably diesel I think I've had about 3 with DPF issues.

There are some know crap designs (and Mazda has been one of them) but most seem to have no issues even when used mainly for town use. Many do actually re-generate just at low speeds and do not need motorway runs.

9/10 if a DPF blocks it is a secondary symptom of something else wrong elsewhere.

The whole isssue is vastly, vastly over blown in this forum and whilst it should be a consideration when buying unless you have very unusual mileage patterms probably not something which should be top of the list to worry about when buying.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Engineer Andy

Out of the last 200-300 or so cars I have bought and sold with about 80% of them probably diesel I think I've had about 3 with DPF issues.

There are some know crap designs (and Mazda has been one of them) but most seem to have no issues even when used mainly for town use. Many do actually re-generate just at low speeds and do not need motorway runs.

9/10 if a DPF blocks it is a secondary symptom of something else wrong elsewhere.

The whole isssue is vastly, vastly over blown in this forum and whilst it should be a consideration when buying unless you have very unusual mileage patterms probably not something which should be top of the list to worry about when buying.

...in your opinion. It depends upon the make, how they are used as well as the specific design of the DPF and related systems - the apparent design flaw with (I think) a certain JLR car means that it CANNOT passively regen its DPF due to its location. Other cars, e.g. Hondas, seem to have been designed better to be less susceptible (but not immune) to their DPF clogging up if the car is mainly used for short urban trips, others somewhere in between.

I'm not sure how you can make such sweeping statements without knowing the full usage history of the cars you sell, especially if you a) only sell second hand cars and are an independent, so those sold may not be maintained at your firm, or b) only sell new cars at a main dealer of one make, therefore have most of your knowledge from one brand.

No-one has said that 'all' diesel cars equipped with DPFs have or will have problems, regardless of usage pattern, but the instances of problems appear to be, from what HJ says he gets in his postbag and from other industry insiders, far higher than older diesel engined cars or petrol engined cars for their emissions control and exhaust systems.

That may well mean this accounts for another 5% (say) than for the other categories, but its still significant, even if the DPF doesn't have to be replaced, but cleaned out by a forced regen at the dealer or a more thorough clean at a specialist. This, if needed reasonably regularly, would not be an insignificant cost to the owner, and may persuade them, especially now with all the negative publicity, to (rightly) switch to a petrol or hybrid petrol engined car that would better suit their usage pattern. The car might then be sold on to someone who DOES need it for long distance driving, thus the issue is then negated for that car.

I would prefer to say that the 'DPF issue' has probably peaked due to all the (negative) publicity and greater amount of information available to us all, as well as (finally) car manufacturers are actually paying attention to the media coverage and complaints from car owners who were (say) deliberately mis-sold or just unaware of/indifferent to this issue after sales of diesels cars has dropped a lot, especially when the increase in petrol cars means that EU limits on corporate CO2 (without getting fines) could be breached or gone even further into the red, incurring even more fines per car.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - pd

It's also reasonable to hope that - given that the first problems with Mazda diesels that we heard about concerned cars mad in the mid-2000s - Mazda will have applied some redesign work to the engine in question so as to have sorted out the problem.

Jury is out on that as they still had engines going pop with blocked atrainers in 2012.

Edited by pd on 03/04/2018 at 00:14

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Engineer Andy

It's also reasonable to hope that - given that the first problems with Mazda diesels that we heard about concerned cars mad in the mid-2000s - Mazda will have applied some redesign work to the engine in question so as to have sorted out the problem.

I'm not sure if they can - the 1.5TD is, I think, the smaller capacity variant of the 1.6 'diesel of doom' developed by PSA (possibly in conjunction with Ford); not sure who the 2.2TD design belongs to, whwther its one they've bought in like the 1.5 or an in-house one they've developed from a commercial diesel engine in their pickup trucks.

Given the smaller size of the firm when compared to the vast majority of other car manufacturers, they may not have the financial clout to solely develop their own complete range of engines, probably (belatedly) they are getting into petrol-hybrids (in partnership with Toyota) with them appearing in the next 2 years or so.

I still say that Mazda should ditch all their unreliable diesel engines and negotiate hard for a tie-up with Honda, as their diesel problems are, in my view, hurting their reputation, and they don't have the financial clout like VAG to withstand a prolonged financial hit if they have to spend £Bns fixing problems and extra PR to fight negative media reports, never mind the likes of us on forums.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - xtrailman

Andy You do write some rubbish i have to say.

The Skyactive design is a Mazda only product, up until last year only fitted to Mazda cars, since then Toyota have bought a 5% stake specifically to study the Mazda engine design, which they say they greatly admire.

Its no coincidence that some Toyota engine now have a simular ratio of 13 to 1 compression, used in other markets, we have 14.1 ratio's in the UK.

Why would anyone want to tie in with Honda, they are no longer the cutting edge engine maker they once were, they aren't even capable of making a F1 engine that is both competitive or reliable.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - argybargy

A post not without fair points, FO, so let me respond as best I can.

I started it because antipathy to diesels is in the news, on this forum in spades, and I find it hard to believe that every smidgeon of that negativity is based on sound evidence rather than anecdote. I was looking for that sound evidence rather than flippant remarks about April 1st.

My acquaintance, being someone who doesn't part with his money without careful thought and research, appears to have swum against that tide. Knowing him as I do, he obviously had sound reasons for doing that. I didn't post before he bought because it wasn't up to me to direct his buying habits for him, for the reasons given above. He knows more about cars than I do, so I didn't consider that to be my place.

Because I know him and trust his judgement, I'm confident that he has given the matter sufficient thought, but hoped to benefit in any case from the expertise of some of those who used this forum.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Andrew-T

.... antipathy to diesels is in the news, on this forum in spades, and I find it hard to believe that every smidgeon of that negativity is based on sound evidence rather than anecdote.

As a slight counterbalance to the diesel antipathy, I would mention (again) my Pug 207 SW with the 1.6 HDi engine, which is just celebrating its tenth birthday by passing its 8th MoT today. I suppose this will be the 'diesel of doom' but it is old enough not to have a DPF, fortunately. Having owned other Pug diesels I am aware of the benefits of changing oil and filter more often than the foolishly long recommended service interval. My car's engine has never needed attention, tho I am considering a cambelt change at 70K (recommended 10 years/100K miles).

I don't believe this is a poor engine if attended to regularly - like many others. Cars whose motors have been neglected are a different matter, as usual.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Vickster44

Thanks you! What a gracious and sensible post.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - skidpan

Thanks you! What a gracious and sensible post.

But read it carefully. The poster said

"but it is old enough not to have a DPF,"

thus will not have the issues that mazda diesels are noted for.

Problems with the "diesel of doom" are mostly related to poor servicing. As I said in a recent post ours (no DPF) ran for 12 years with no issues. Problems with the Mazda are due to poor design of the emmision system and no amount of servicing will gaurantee reliable motoring.

If I was doing sufficent miles I would probably still be driving a diesel but it would 100% not be a Mazda.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Vickster44

This is a great car to drive. The engine is wonderfully well sound proofed so bangs and rattles are almost non existent.There is s great slug of smooth power at low revs thats missing completely from petrol,even turbo petrol engines, and that's a very alluring asset.

It only remains to see whether the car stays trouble free and as it is brand new and as I rarely take no for an answer with warranty matters, I am quietly confident! Counting no chickens though.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - pd

he Seat was faster, more refined, more flexible and averaging 45 mpg for almost 4 years very nearly as economical. It was also £2000 cheaper than the equivalent diesel, using Honest Johns real MPG figures the break even point (taking the lower depreciation of the diesel into account) was over 60,000 miles, far longer than we keep cars these days.

...and that's probably not taking into account any expensive issues on a modern diesel that might cost the Earth to fix, if you keep the car after its 5th or 6th birthday. Too many punters these days just look at the mpg only. More fool them for not doing their homework (and it doesn't take that much, with the Interweb and forums such as this to help) at all - just plain lazy. Odd that, given the car is the second most expensive purchase a person will likely ever make in their lifetime.

If you look at the stuff going into a modern petrol (ncluding particulate filters) and in cars in general if you are of the nervous type you wouldn't really want to keep *any* car made today much beyond 6 years.

The electrical systems alone are totally beyind 90% of people in the "trade" including many franchised dealers in my experience.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - skidpan

I don't believe this is a poor engine if attended to regularly - like many others. Cars whose motors have been neglected are a different matter, as usual.

I agree. We had a 1.6 TDCi C-Max for 5 years and never had an issue (other than a cracking alternator belt). Chap who bought it had it 7 years. It died late last year at 12 years old. He has no complaints, one of his longer lasting cars. He maintains them well but they lead a hard life.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Engineer Andy

I don't believe this is a poor engine if attended to regularly - like many others. Cars whose motors have been neglected are a different matter, as usual.

I agree. We had a 1.6 TDCi C-Max for 5 years and never had an issue (other than a cracking alternator belt). Chap who bought it had it 7 years. It died late last year at 12 years old. He has no complaints, one of his longer lasting cars. He maintains them well but they lead a hard life.

We're lucky to have lived through and (hopefully) owned quality cars that were built during the 'sweet spot' period of automotive manufacturing - emissions regulations not too stringent that it mean loads of control devices like DPFs or design changes that are unreliable or make the car not pleasant to drive (e.g. poor mid-range grunt in N/A petrol engined cars), weren't full of unnecessary electronics and gadgets that aren't really tried and tested, but had decent performance and handling characteristics as well as being reasonably comfortable (no 18in rims and £500+ bills for tyre replacements).

I am seriously contemplating keeping my 12yo Mazda3 (barring terminal corrosion, OK at present) for a LOT longer, especially if my career change doesn't happen anytime soon and money is going to be tight for a few years. I see a LOAD of these and Focus mk2s locally, all looking perfectly good for essentially cars that are in (modern day) old age.

With many new cars, they (in my opinion) are either way too expensive for what they are (with no reasonably priced lower spec option available) or very complex, unreliable/not proven (changing too much too quickly just to keep up with competitors) and the few 'basic' (and 'good value' [more 'cheap n cheerful to me) are from makes I personally don't associate with high reliability/engineering quality, and the cars themselves are that great to drive, certainly not any better than my 'aged' Mazda.

I just hope that governments realise the error in their ways as regards (often) stupid laws and regulations as regards exhaust emissions and testing (the new EU test hopefully is, for once, a step in the right direction), to encourage manufacturers worldwide to K.I.S.S. (kepp it simple stupid), as making cars so complex just to fit in with artifical regulations is ruining reliability (and sometimes functionality) when, in theory, they should be almost bullet-proof, given the quality of the previous generation between the late 90s and mid 2000s.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - skidpan

We're lucky to have lived through and (hopefully) owned quality cars that were built during the 'sweet spot' period of automotive manufacturing

I have been lucky to have quality cars and still have quality cars. I have also had right piles of bull excrement which were the norm in the 60's, 70's and into the 80's.

Todays cars are absolutely brilliant. A vast majority never need to see a garage between services, never fail to start on a damp/cold winters morning and don't rust away before your eyes before they are 5 years old.

There are undoubtably some dogs out there but they are few and far between and if buyers were more careful they could be avoided.

Its not a perfect motoring world but its a hell of a lot closer to perfection than it was 30, 40 or 50 years ago.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Oli rag
I couldn’t agree more, today’s cars are brilliant. If you think of the problems we used to have with older cars. Rust, bad starting and running, poor road holding and mpg. That was with none of the gadgets that we all have become used to. I think the only way we have gone backwards is that cars used to have comfortable rides, now that’s more the exception than the norm and I for one don’t think that’s an improvement.
Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - corax
I couldn’t agree more, today’s cars are brilliant. If you think of the problems we used to have with older cars. Rust, bad starting and running, poor road holding and mpg. That was with none of the gadgets that we all have become used to. I think the only way we have gone backwards is that cars used to have comfortable rides, now that’s more the exception than the norm and I for one don’t think that’s an improvement.

Ventilation systems aren't as good now. Many cars used to have a separate cold air feed, independent of the warm air vents. I can't think of many cars that do this anymore except BMW and Mercedes.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Andrew-T

<< I am seriously contemplating keeping my 12yo Mazda3 (barring terminal corrosion, OK at present) for a LOT longer, >>

As I mentioned above, our workhorse car just passed its 10th anniversary. My backup vehicle will reach its 28th next month and is in a surprisingly good state of preservation, with 146K on the shell and about 100K on the engine, which has been thoroughly overhauled. It also passed its MoT wothout advisories. If I choose to have it repainted it could almost approach showroom appearance. It has no airbags, satnav, crumple zones, cupholders, rearview cameras or many other gizmos, but it gets me enjoyably from A to B. And doing what I can to improve it helps to pass the time.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Chorlton2080

I've not had any problems with my 2016 Mazda diesel, but the bigger issue for me is the paint. Have you had any issues with yours in terms of how easily it chips?

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - xtrailman

Personally i would ignore most of what has been posted on this forum.

I'm on my 3rd diesel with a DPF, never had an issue with any clogging, never take it on a trash down the motorway to clean, which is a stupid idea.

I only do 7K miles a year, mileage is 90% A and B roads, run it on Tesco fuel mainly, tow a caravan of 1700kg, and not had an issue worth talking about.

Some early Skyactive engines which came out in 2012 did have problems with excessive oil rise, prematuring cams and prematuring brake vacuum pumps, i had the latter and was only aware of it during the 2 year service, the garage tested it under a campaign and it failed, so a new one was fitted.

I latter learnt that the engine was with in a batch fitted with the dogey cams and so traded it in for my present 2015 cx-5. This one has very little oil rise considering the number of times i have interupted a regen. And apparently a 2017 owner with over 8K on his car reports no oil rise, he is a working mechanic.

The latest 6 has been refined over its lifespan and is now the optimum time to buy one IMO.

My present 175ps 420nm 2.2 diesel with AWD and torque convertor auto is brilliant, and i will be probably buying another when the 190ps 450nm diesel becomes available in the UK, at present it's only in Japan.

In other markets the 6 is available with a 2.5 NA engine, and a 2.5T petrol with 420nm of torque.....

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - FP

I would question the logic of making generalisations based on one's own (i.e. limited) experience.

What we know is that in the past Mazda diesels have in many cases (I'm not saying "most" - we don't have the statistics) proved unreliable. I think that is accepted. It remains to be seen whether they have now solved the problem.

When I decided to buy a CX-5 I was absolutely clear in my mind that it would be petrol. Maxda's reputation for building reliable petrol engines I think is also accepted. I wasn't prepared to make a leap of faith in the direction of a diesel.

As it turns out, I am more than happy with my choice. And I shall be interested to see how Mazda's latest petrol technology turns out (the so-called Skyactiv-X, due for launch in 2019), and whether it will eventually make their diesels redundant.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - xtrailman

I would sooner listen to owners of the car with personal experience myself rather than sweeping statements made on this thread. I know a few who are on their second CX-5 diesel now not just myself. Speaks for itsself.

Of cause a NA petrol will be potentially more reliable than any turbo engine, mazda are one of the few that still offer 2L NA engines.

Edited by xtrailman on 07/04/2018 at 14:22

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - daveyK_UK

im sorry xtrailman

but when it comes to mazda diesels, there are simply too many horror stories

Why take the risk on an expensive purchase?

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - skidpan

but when it comes to mazda diesels, there are simply too many horror stories

Why take the risk on an expensive purchase?

At 7000 miles a year buying a diesel is not beneficial regardless of brand. Mazda charge £2500 approx extra for the diesel and using HJ's real MPG figures you would need to be do 100,000 miles before you recouped the money. Considering that the OP is hoping to keep the car m,any years recouping some of the extra £2500 does not figure in the calcs.

That is 14 years. If the OP has DPF (or any diesel related issues) in the 14 years he could be well out of pocket.

It simply does not make sense.

However

Having driven a couple of Mazda 2 litre petrols I have to say that are pretty poor so if it came down to a decision based on Mazda 6 petrol v Mazda 6 diesel on a short test drive I can probably see why the diesel won.

Fortunately there are other brands available who make excellent petrols.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - xtrailman

I buy tow cars, a 2L NA petrol 2L Mazda engine would be a step back 20 years for me. I also only run one car so reliability is important to me, so i usually buy Japanese cars made in Japan.

Cost doesn't actually come into any decision i make buying a car, only power, torque kerb weight, and noseweight limit.

If i didn't tow a turbo petrol would be my choice but still a high powered one simply because i'm used to one now.

Last petrol i bought i took a risk with because it was a Vag product with the usual question mark with reliability. Mine was luckerly ok, apart from the wheels corroding onto the hubs in year one, squeaking windscreen wipers, and a failed window switch, all was well, apart from the time after service when the car wouldn't start.

I suspected a failed spark ignitor common at the time for my car a 1.8T A4 Audi Quattro Avant, but it turned out that the service boy had disturbed the wiring to an engine sensor accessing the oil filter.

Problem is that model at the time with 180bhp and 177 pound feet of torque only had a towlimit of 1500kg, useless for my 1700kg caravan. 2017 CX-5 diesel tows 2100kg. Petrol cars are often rated to tow lower weights.

The power delivery makes for a really nice relaxing drive and as a bonus will return more MPG than a petrol, once I've handed over my cash that wrote off mentally, its only the running costs that I look at.

On the subject of Mazda Skyactive DPF I have yet to read of a single post that mentions DPF failure and the need to replace one.

Don't confuse the skyactive cars with the old lower compression 2L diesels that had failing injector seals leading to blocked sump pickup strainers, oil starvation, blocked oil ways and expensive engine repairs.

Edited by xtrailman on 07/04/2018 at 17:11

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - skidpan

I buy tow cars, a 2L NA petrol 2L Mazda engine would be a step back 20 years for me. I also only run one car so reliability is important to me, so i usually buy Japanese cars made in Japan.

Cost doesn't actually come into any decision i make buying a car, only power, torque kerb weight, and noseweight limit.

I towed for many years, the Caterham on a covered transporter, wieghed about 1200kg all in. Originally towed with a Golf GTi. 112 bhp, 112 torques, kerb weight 970 kg and a tow limit of 1200 kg. Never had a single issue even though we were as close to the limit as possible, used it from 1989 to 1996. Then in 1996 bought a Golf TDi. 90 bhp and 148 torques. Towed better without a doubt and with a limit of 1500kg we had a bit of spare capacity. Then in 2002 came a Mondeo TDCi 130 PS which although brilliant we did not tow that much with it, sold trailer soon after be bought the car.

If we were still towing now I would probably be looking at something like the Octavia VRS TSi. 230 PS and 258 torques (from 1500 to 4600 rpm) I would expect it to be brilliant.

With our low annual mileage a diesel would be totally stupid (forgetting the extra purchase cost) and why take the risk when there are petrol turbo's out there that have the ability to do the job.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - xtrailman

Octavia is too light for a 1700kg caravan.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Engineer Andy
On the subject of Mazda Skyactive DPF I have yet to read of a single post that mentions DPF failure and the need to replace one.

Read: www.honestjohn.co.uk/carbycar/mazda/6-2013/?sectio...d

On (the 2013 and onwardds) Mazda 6s doing (often but not exclusively) short trips an interruption of the apparently very frequent active regens of the DPF results in the rising sump oil level. Many reports on the 'Good & Bad' part of the Review, including ones from 2016 & 2017. Sounds like a significant problem (even if the DPF itself isn't always replaced) to me...also many other problems on the 2.2TD models, far more than on the 2.0 petrol (including that fitted to the 3 mk3 as well).

I have no axe to grind BTW - I've owned a Mazda3 (admitedly a 1.6 petrol mk1) since new, had it maintained at my local main dealer all throughout its life with no major problems, just normal 'wear and tear' replacements. I'm a fan of Mazdas, and know how good to drive the 2.2TD is, far better (much more powerful and responsive) than the de-rated 2.0 petrol (not much quicker unless you rag it) than my 1.6 petrol.

A shame the 2.5 petrol (185hp, same as the diesel, though probably a lot less torque) hasn't made it to our shores - apparently its doing a good trade Down Under and probably in North America. That I could've gone for in the 3 (especially if they had an auto option).

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - xtrailman

Thats right not a single DPF has been reported being replaced, only oil rise, and not everyone gets it.

Edited by xtrailman on 07/04/2018 at 22:25

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Engineer Andy

Thats right not a single DPF has been reported being replaced, only oil rise, and not everyone gets it.

The problem as I see it is due to the DPF actively working far more than it should need to, even for drivers who don't do that many short trips. To me, that indicates a design flaw with the emissions control system, which includes that of the DPF, how and when it operates.

Rather than knackering the DPF as happens on other engines, the problems on the Mazda 2.2TD end up affecting other, but related systems. Who cares if the DPF isn't always broken if other engine components have to repaired or replaced at great cost or inconvenience on a regular basis?

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - xtrailman

What parts are you talking about?

The way the Mazda carries out its regens isnt very impressive, usually its based on mileage not use, on the 2017 model update, the timed intervals are now about 300 miles.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Engineer Andy

What parts are you talking about?

The way the Mazda carries out its regens isnt very impressive, usually its based on mileage not use, on the 2017 model update, the timed intervals are now about 300 miles.

If they're 'timed intervals', then that's daft in my view, as the rate at which the DPF clogs up depends on the type of driving done - the more short trips and slow speed urban driving (and from cold) you do, the quicker it clogs up that if you do longer trips at faster speeds, creating less soot to burn off.

The point seems to be (in my view, and it seems, many other people's) generally that, as well as some other makes and models (e.g. the latest Land Rover Disco Sport, others) suffer particularly if you do anything other than longer trips at faster speeds or work the engine hard (e.g. towing) that passively burns off the soot. This may result in different problems, but it still seems to be a design flaw in my view.

Please don't take our criticism of this particular engine so personally, just because you've bought a car with it. You may have had no issues, and that's great, as otherwise its a great engine as regards driving, but you have to recognise that the vast, vast majority of the problems with Mazdas are associated with the diesel engines.

I think that you also need to recognise that just because you haven't had any problems, then that does not mean no-one else will (or should) have any, or that all those complaints about them in HJ's Good and Bad section are 'fake news' or suchlike.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - skidpan

The way the Mazda carries out its regens isnt very impressive, usually its based on mileage not use, on the 2017 model update, the timed intervals are now about 300 miles.

The 2 diesels we have owned with DPF did their regens in a very different way.

The BMW 118D carried out its regens when the soot loading reached the preset level. The frequency depended on use. Once started they appeared to last quite a while. I can remember driving to the coast one day and a regen starting about 20 miles from Whitby. When we got there it was still regenerating. But the BMW would restart the regen once the engine was back up to temp so on the way home it was regenerating for about another 20 miles.

The Kia Ceed would carry out a regen every 300 miles when we bought it but after an ECU update this reduced to every 250 miles. They would normally last about 15 minutes and would complete with no issues driving back from Tesco, about 7 miles at town speed. problem was if ypu stopped mid regen it would not restart until it decided to. Could be anywhere between 50 and 100 miles. More than 2 interupted regens would probably result in a forced regen at the dealer to get the light out.

Which did I perfer. The Kia definitely but with the BMW's instant regen restart after interuption.

Kia have very few reported DPF issues on forums so they must be doing something correct.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - xtrailman

I haven't timed the regen length but its not long, the BMW over 40 miles sounds like it was faulty.

I don't think Mazda are going about it correctly either, but using mileage to regen at least helps offset any sensor error monitoring the differential pressure across the DPF to activate a regen.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - skidpan

I haven't timed the regen length but its not long, the BMW over 40 miles sounds like it was faulty.

Not faulty, like it all the 5 1/2 years I had it. Some regens were longer than others and that would probably be one of the longest because it was interupted. If I was only using the car locally a regen could take 2 or 3 days to complete.

But on a long trip the BMW regenerated far less than the Kia. On a couple of trips over 400 miles the BMW never regenerated. But the Kia could carry out 3 regens on a 400 mile trip if one was due just after we set off. Over a year I would put money on the BMW spending less time doing regens.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - xaghra

The garage I go to said do not buy diesel only petrol for Mazda 6 auto as they are really lousy

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - mum2atoddler

We purchased a 2.2D CX5 in March. We went into the purchase knowing of the issues regarding the Diesel engine in the past. After the face lift the issues were widely ironed out and in the new model the issues don't arise at all. The issues Mazda had still happen in other Marques, I've been reading about the very same problem with LR Evoques and it's not unheard of with petrol engines either. The regens on the new Mazda are not timed, I've had regens after 200 miles and up to 500 miles. They only last about 7 minutes. We look after and take care of our cars, so we know the oil level hasn't moved at all since it was new and I never stop or turn the engine off if its actively regening.

Obviously time will tell whether it remains reliable, it hasn't given us any cause at all to worry it won't. We test drove all it's competitors and the CX5 drove and handled better than most. It's also the only car we haven't needed to go back to the dealers for any irritating new car niggles.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - FP

"Obviously time will tell whether it remains reliable..."

Indeed, but Mazda's diesel reputation meant that when I bought my CX-5 I ruled out the diesel versions entirely.

I agree the car is a lovely drive and I'm sure the diesel performs in most areas better than the petrol, though I've no complaints.

It would be nice to think Mazda have eventually got it right with diesels, but for me it's a leap in the dark.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Avant

Welcome back to the forum: I see you were last here about 5 years ago. Stay with us and good luck with the CX-5.

As I said further up the thread in April, it's reasonable to hope that after all this time Mazda have sorted out the problem, and that new ones like yours shou d be reliable..

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - mum2atoddler

Thanks, i certainly hope it will be. This will be our last diesel car i'm guessing because of the way things are going. I wanted something a little more fun and far better looking than the CRV we had before and that was an awful car for reliability!.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Vickster44

I am the person who bought myself a brand new Mazda 6 sel-nav 2.2diesel way back in May '18, possibly an ill-advised move to buy the diesel according to some of the sages on here,so I thought I might add to this thread and let anyone interested know of the various problems and issues that this car has given me over the past 15 months.

Ummm... nope, not a single issue or problem after 12,000 miles :-)

I know its resale value will be poor but I don't care, 'cos it is gorgeous to drive and I intend to keep it for a long time.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Engineer Andy

As many people have said, it's HOW you use such cars that makes as much of a difference as how it's maintained. Sufficient amounts of longer trips to provide passive DPF regens means you should have little in the way of issues.

Longer term, though, any failures will end up costing far more than the petrol engined equivalent, which is less complex and thus there's less to go wrong, and what does costs less to repair/replace.

Just be wary if your usage pattern changes, e.g. due to a change in circumstances, e.g. job or house move, or having kids, any of which might mean lots of shorter trips and less longer ones. You could find things go South very rapidly in such circumstances if you're not careful, especially as the car passes the end of its manufacturer's warranty.

Make sure you keep on top of your local Mazda dealership as regards servicing - as a long-term Mazda car owner myself, I know from discussing the issue with fellow owners that the main dealership experience with them can be VERY hit and miss - some a great, some are ok, quite a few are terrible.

It's well worth putting up with travelling further to use a decent dealership than a local one that has a bad reputation, especially during the warranty period. Keep an eye on the Mazda owners forums, not just for the 6, but all the other cars in their range as their owners' experiences are just as useful.

I hope you continue to enjoy your car. I still do with mine - I just put 1k miles on it going on holiday for two weeks, no problems at all (13+yo car).

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - SLO76

I am the person who bought myself a brand new Mazda 6 sel-nav 2.2diesel way back in May '18, possibly an ill-advised move to buy the diesel according to some of the sages on here,so I thought I might add to this thread and let anyone interested know of the various problems and issues that this car has given me over the past 15 months.

Ummm... nope, not a single issue or problem after 12,000 miles :-)

I know its resale value will be poor but I don't care, 'cos it is gorgeous to drive and I intend to keep it for a long time.

Despite the poor reputation for failure the bulk of owners will see no trouble at all if used and maintained correctly. Sadly though there are loads of these sitting at auction with engine problems and plenty of tales of woe online from owners who’ve been badly stung. A large part of it is blind luck. Mazda just can’t do diesels reliably and rather than becoming overly confident because it’s been good to date I’d be thinking about replacing it before the original warranty is up. It’s a shame though as I love these big cars and the powerful diesel suits it far better than the reliable but sluggish (by comparison) petrol.
Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Engineer Andy

I am the person who bought myself a brand new Mazda 6 sel-nav 2.2diesel way back in May '18, possibly an ill-advised move to buy the diesel according to some of the sages on here,so I thought I might add to this thread and let anyone interested know of the various problems and issues that this car has given me over the past 15 months.

Ummm... nope, not a single issue or problem after 12,000 miles :-)

I know its resale value will be poor but I don't care, 'cos it is gorgeous to drive and I intend to keep it for a long time.

Despite the poor reputation for failure the bulk of owners will see no trouble at all if used and maintained correctly. Sadly though there are loads of these sitting at auction with engine problems and plenty of tales of woe online from owners who’ve been badly stung. A large part of it is blind luck. Mazda just can’t do diesels reliably and rather than becoming overly confident because it’s been good to date I’d be thinking about replacing it before the original warranty is up. It’s a shame though as I love these big cars and the powerful diesel suits it far better than the reliable but sluggish (by comparison) petrol.

They might be a bit more fortunate in this case if they bought the car brand new, then at least they don't have to worry about what they previous owner did with it. If they do mainly decent length trips where the engine can fully warm up and the DPF can regen passively, then they shouldn't have too many issues in the first few years at least (assuming, as I indicated, if they get it serviced correctly/on time via a decent main dealer), but I agree that in the longer term, it will be somewhat of a lottery as to how reliable it will prove to be.

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Vickster44

Good advice as always.

And yes..having it from brand new, at least I know exactly how the 6 has been run and serviced so if it were treated poorly ,which it isn't, then tis nobody's fault but mine.

On the subject of good dealers and not so good dealers it is surely very hard to know one from the other? A dealer that greets you with smiles and latte , might employ a careless spanner monkey who over fills the oil or uses an old filter- and vice versa .

Mazda 6 diesel - Mistake, or not? - Engineer Andy

Good advice as always.

And yes..having it from brand new, at least I know exactly how the 6 has been run and serviced so if it were treated poorly ,which it isn't, then tis nobody's fault but mine.

On the subject of good dealers and not so good dealers it is surely very hard to know one from the other? A dealer that greets you with smiles and latte , might employ a careless spanner monkey who over fills the oil or uses an old filter- and vice versa .

As I said in one of my other (recent) posts, Mazda car owners forums are a valuable resource in determining which main dealers are good, bad and middling. The Mazda3 owners forum site, for example, has a specific section for the dealership experience and for maintenance.

I'm sure there is (somewhere) a Mazda6 owners forum site as well, but any Mazda owners club/forum is useful in that regard, given the commonalities in designs and the ownership experience. Bear in mind though that some forums and discussion threads may be or including quite old posts, so some information may be out of date, but it's always worth asking on them if (especially if the original posters are still around) the information is still accurate.

Admitedly, like many forums, they are individuals' opinions, where it's not easy to fully back them up with facts, though the more (good or bad) accounts tend to back up the viewpoints to a reasonable degree, especially if they are detailed.

 

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