Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - jonnyjjbean

Hi - looking at a Mazda 6 after a reccomendation from someone on honest john (family of 4 need something bigger and was advised against SUV's).

I like the Look of the Mazda 6 and happy with what I can get for my budget - around 5-6k.

There is one I have seen - 2011, £5k, 85,000 miles, only 1 former keeper.

However the MOT history looks a little odd..the first MOT in 2014 was clocked at 72k; thereafter it's only done 3k every year....

Is that pretty normal for 1 person? I am guessing maybe it's been a company car that's moved from someone doing loads of miles to someone local...

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - Happy Blue!

If the servicing records match the MoT records then your assumption is probably correct.

I bought a car that had done only 21,000 miles in four years. And another had done 11,000 in 11 years. Both old men simply shopping and playing golf.

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - Doc

Low mileage does not always equate to short journeys. It could mean, especially for a second car, that only infrequent long trips are undertaken and the rest of the time the vehicle is kept in a dry garage.

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - SLO76
As long as it’s been serviced annually despite that low mileage and the Mot and service history stack up then I wouldn’t be concerned. These are good big wagons in petrol form but be wary of the diesels even the PSA 2.0 in some of these.
Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - DieselBoy

I'm guessing if the car did 72k in 3 years, it must be diesel, and the 2.2 diesel at that.

Beware,

This engine has a habit of gunking up the oil strainer, resulting in loss of pressure and subsequent engine damage.

I bought a 2009 '59' plate Mazda 6 in October 2013, with 92k on the clock. At approximately 120k, in March 2016, my oil light came on. Luckily, I avoided any immediate engine damage and got away with just having the sump dropped and strainer cleaned. I part exchanged shortly afterward - even the Kia dealer who took it was aware of the problem.

This cleaning is not part of any Mazda service regime.

So, if it's petrol - ace. Go for it. I loved my 6 estate. If it's diesel - think long and hard.

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - jonnyjjbean

Thanks, it's the petrol one! I've been told to avoid diesel for most cars with this milage. Unfortunately for every 100 estates only 5 seem to be petrol: /

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - DieselBoy

Well, like I say - ace!

My 6 was a brilliant car, let down by the engine. I'd have another (petrol) like a shot.

I'm guessing the one you're looking at is the black one, YP60? Looks good.

Edited by DieselBoy on 15/01/2018 at 23:03

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - pd

If it has 1 former keeper that means 2 ownwers in total. Probably a fleet/company/lease car for 3 years when it clocked up 20k a year then went into private hands to a low mileage owners who moved it on after 3-4 years.

Fairly typical ownership pattern for that type of car.

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - jonnyjjbean

Thanks.
The service record is as follows:

  1. 25/10/2010
  2. 03/06/2011
  3. 30/12/2011
  4. 13/07/2012
  5. 10/01/2018 (by the garage selling it)

A concern?


Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - veloceman
I would say so.
Could have done 100k more in that time and been clocked.
Far too long not to have been serviced. Oil deteriorates with time as well as mileage.
I would do an mot history check also, see if all matches.
Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - veloceman
Sorry, I note you already done that!
Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - jonnyjjbean

Thanks - MOT shows 3k a year dring the time it wasn't serviced. I am guessing the owner didn't feel the miles they were putting on it warranted a service as opposed to not getting the book stamped.

So hard trying to find a decent car!!! Grrrr. :(

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - SLO76
Last owner has either been servicing it themselves or hasn’t bothered at all. 5 1/2 years without spanners! Unless there’s proof it’s been serviced in that time such as invoices for parts then I’d leave it and find something else.
Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - Andrew-T

The service record is as follows:

  1. 25/10/2010 03/06/2011 30/12/2011 13/07/2012
  2. 10/01/2018 (by the garage selling it)

A concern?

It seems the one former keeper was a heavy traveller, then the next owner did 3K a year but only serviced it every 12K - which may be what the service schedule advises. Many on here would advise differently. If the car's warranty expired at 6 years is that why it is on the market?

It may be a good buy or not. Once a car reaches middle age, not much is predictable and you have to make your own decisions using your skill and judgment, as the competitions used to say. If you are suspicious of almost every car you see, you may never buy a used one .....

Edited by Andrew-T on 16/01/2018 at 18:53

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - Engineer Andy

Thanks, it's the petrol one! I've been told to avoid diesel for most cars with this milage. Unfortunately for every 100 estates only 5 seem to be petrol: /

Not really a suprise - like most manufacturers, diesels were heavily promoted for any car the size of a Focus and up in the last 20 years, regardless of the annual mileage and/or type of journeys undertaken by the person the dealer is trying to sell them to. Unless people have written proof of a dealer saying a low-mileage (used for short trips only) diesel-powered car being ok for that sort of use, nobody has really any comeback as regards all the huge bills they and future buyers face when looking at owning a diesel-powered car.

Probably why there's so many (and because the vast majority of hire cars are diesels as they actually DO lots of miles, as well as the knock-on effects of dieselgate and particular issues with certain makes.engines other than VAG's [Mazda diesels as an example]) diesels now on the market. Most petrol-engined cars are still bought by more savvy, perhaps older private buyers, who, in my view are more careful about what they buy and bother to do their homework as to what is most suitable. That's not to say anyone buying a diesel is an idiot. I think a lot of people bought into the hype about diesels 20 years ago (including at government level) and its only just dawning on them that things aren't quite so 'green' or 'economical'.

Sadly this does mean that petrol-engined cars are grwoing in popularity, with demand, especially on the second-hand market, outstripping supply. From what I've seen (I'm sure SLO and other experts in this area will be more aware than amateurs like myself), thi has lead to some softening of diesel car prices and a firming up of petrol car prices, but not as much I would've thought under the circumstances - maybe the effects of all these issues hasn't filtered down yet completely. I know some makes still are keen to flog diesel cars more than petrol ones (even hybrids or EVs) for the C-size and below, which I find very odd to say the least.

The same goes for 'Sport' models - lots of nearly new or ex-demo/showroom models on sale, yet very few of the upper-middle models with the still good spec and higher profile (nicer riding and cheaper to run) tyres and smaller wheels. Hopefully manufacturers can wean themselves off these models and be more realistic in what stock they keep - they might end up selling more cars with better profit margins, rather than flogging Sport models at a loss/very small margins to meet artificial sales targets and be saddled with digruntled owners who hate the ride quality and having to pay out twice as much (and much more often) for replacement low profile tyres.

You may want to try Mazda dealers around the reg change time, as some older cars that have been well-maintained at their delaer networks (and owned by one private buyer and carefully looked after) are often Part-exchanged for newer cars at this time, often because they liked the old model but just want something newer. Dealers are likely to want to shift such cars off their lot quickly, so keep an eye out before they disappear off to the auctions or indie dealers, as you may find a few good offers.

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - pd

Whilst petrols work quite well these days on small to medium cars and are hence quite popular once you get into the larger stuff (D/E Class up) then really over the last 10-15 years the petrols have made very little impact.

This is for a number of reasons but in that sector people generally buy to do a fair number of miles, many are fleet so BIK CO2 is very important, there seems to be a larger differences in real world fuel consumption and in many cases the petrol option has been pure and simply crap. Cars like an Insignia 1.8 which wheezes along with no guts and does 25mpg.

In many cases there was no sane reason to buy the petrol option but to be fair the Japanese have tended to make better offerings.

This is chaging somewhat now on the new market but if you're looking at 5-10 year old cars there won't be many of them.

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - skidpan

It seems the one former keeper was a heavy traveller, then the next owner did 3K a year but only serviced it every 12K - which may be what the service schedule advises.

Service intervals are always distance and time. An example would be 12,000 miles or 12 months which ever comes first. A sensible person would never leave a car 6 years without a service.

If the car's warranty expired at 6 years is that why it is on the market?

Mazda warranty is 3 years 60,000 miles. ..

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - pd

It seems the one former keeper was a heavy traveller, then the next owner did 3K a year but only serviced it every 12K - which may be what the service schedule advises.

Service intervals are always distance and time. An example would be 12,000 miles or 12 months which ever comes first. A sensible person would never leave a car 6 years without a service.

If the car's warranty expired at 6 years is that why it is on the market?

Mazda warranty is 3 years 60,000 miles. ..

Some manufacturer's service schedules do omit the oil change if not enough mileage has been done. Porsche is one I can think of.

Modern fully synthetic oil really doesn't suffer much from sitting around a few years and changing every 3000 miles is excessive in most circumstances.

The rest of a "service" is basically a check over at many intervals from many manufacturers - a fair old chunk of which gets covered at MOT time anyway.

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - catsdad
There is an assumption being made that its only the 3k a year owner who didnt have it serviced. Thats not how I read it. The last service prior to the current one was in 2012 (say at 48k), the first MoT was in 2014 at 72k. This means no service for 5.5 years and 37k (approx)

If thats the true situation it suggests its best to buy elsewhere. However Jonny hasnt said what form the service history takes. Mazda doesnt issue service books for the Mazda 3 so I assume the 6 is the same. However the official history is available online to anyone with the registration number. In case the history he's seen is simply the receipts then its worth doing the online check to see if the system tells him more.

Also, if not already done, it might be worth a check with the previous owner? My son bought an approved Mazda 3 last year with an apparent service gap that the selling dealer hadnt followed up. When the gap was pointed out (before the deal was signed) they contacted the previous owner and he had had the missng service done on time by a good local indie and receipts were produced. and the selling dealer confirmed in writing that it satisfied Mazda approved standards. A good result.

Mazda approved covers quite old cars (up to 10 years old??) without much of a price premium so its worth checking the offical site if not already done.
Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - jonnyjjbean
There is an assumption being made that its only the 3k a year owner who didnt have it serviced. Thats not how I read it. The last service prior to the current one was in 2012 (say at 48k), the first MoT was in 2014 at 72k. This means no service for 5.5 years and 37k (approx) If thats the true situation it suggests its best to buy elsewhere. However Jonny hasnt said what form the service history takes. Mazda doesnt issue service books for the Mazda 3 so I assume the 6 is the same. However the official history is available online to anyone with the registration number. In case the history he's seen is simply the receipts then its worth doing the online check to see if the system tells him more. Also, if not already done, it might be worth a check with the previous owner? My son bought an approved Mazda 3 last year with an apparent service gap that the selling dealer hadnt followed up. When the gap was pointed out (before the deal was signed) they contacted the previous owner and he had had the missng service done on time by a good local indie and receipts were produced. and the selling dealer confirmed in writing that it satisfied Mazda approved standards. A good result. Mazda approved covers quite old cars (up to 10 years old??) without much of a price premium so its worth checking the offical site if not already done.

Thank you - where would one check this record?

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - Engineer Andy

Check via the selling dealer if it's a main dealer - I saw a customer doing this at my local main dealer when I was getting my Mazda3 serviced a few weeks ago. Not sure what you would do if was being sold at an indie or privately - maybe via Mazda UK if a dealership couldn't look it up.

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - SLO76
Call any Mazda dealer, they should be happy to verify if it has any history. You may have to pay for a print out if you wish to keep a copy though. I absolutely hate this recent development from several manufacturers. If you buy a new or approved used car from a main dealer insist on a service book and make sure it’s stamped up to date on any used car. This is a must for resale and is a pain in the ass for non-franchises dealers. But it will backfire as the trade underbid cars in expectation of missing or difficult to prove service histories.
Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - catsdad
Jonny I accessed the system in November last year from the Mazda main site. It was easy and free and just required the reg no. The problem is I can't remember exactly what I did and going back today I can't get it to work without registering as the owner with VIN details.

Maybe it was a fluke as googling suggests its always been necessary to register. So as others have said you may need to go via a friendly Mazda dealer. However can't the selling dealer do this legwork for you as its up to them to support the service history and I'd expect them to bear any fee. If they can't be bothered for the sake of a sale then whats their after sales going to be like if you hit a problem? By the way can you say what form the existing quoted service history is in?

I actually like the idea of online service. Most service books have a stamp and a few random looking ticks and are easily forged or lost. Far better to have the info online although it needs to be read-only accessible to avoid the nonfranchised issues the SLO mentions.
Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - pd
Most service books have a stamp and a few random looking ticks and are easily forged or lost. Far better to have the info online although it needs to be read-only accessible to avoid the nonfranchised issues the SLO mentions.

There is no reason why you cannot have both. Many manufacturers have central databases of when a car has been into a dealer and also have a service book for non-franchsied servicing.

Virtually no car unless written off early spends all its life in a franchised dealer network.

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - nailit

When I have my mazda 6 serviced the main dealer has always (twice as only 2 services) handed over the service sheets without my prompting. It is registered online, I had to provide vin number iirc and my details, this is checked before you can access.All the service details are there too. So there is no excuse for no service history unless the previous owner couldn't be bothered to retain or ask for the service sheets.

Edited by nailit on 18/01/2018 at 19:20

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - rogerzilla1

I have a petrol (165PS) estate on order. It's been on order for over four months, although it is finally on the boat from Japan and should be here for 1st March.

According to the salesman, Mazda didn't anticipate the diesel backlash and production (and the stock held at the European hub) was very much geared to diesel. I could have had a diesel estate in a fortnight from ordering!

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - Engineer Andy

I have a petrol (165PS) estate on order. It's been on order for over four months, although it is finally on the boat from Japan and should be here for 1st March.

According to the salesman, Mazda didn't anticipate the diesel backlash and production (and the stock held at the European hub) was very much geared to diesel. I could have had a diesel estate in a fortnight from ordering!

My local dealership seems to be mostly stocked with diesels at present and are seemingly very keenly priced in comparison to the relatively few petrol-engined cars they are holding. Given Mazda have had many problems in the last decade (and, it seems still do, in my view [looking at reports here and elesewhere) with the reliability of their diesel-engined cars, you'd think that they would've 'got the hint' after dieselgate erupted and gradually wound back production of diesel-engined cars in favour of their very reliable petrol-engined ones, especially as they're seemingly making very decent progress with their new-fangled, very efficient HCCI petrol engines for the next gen of their cars.

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - rogerzilla1

My MX-5 only does about 1,500 miles a year but they are all good runs (over 10 miles, usually 40-60 miles) and it is properly mothballed in winter - garaged immediately after a hard run in dry weather, wheels on tyre savers, handbrake off, fuel stabliser in a full tank of fresh fuel, battery on trickle charge, dehumifidifier crystals in cabin.

It is a bit irksome taking it for an annual 12,500 mile service when it has barely done 10% of that milage, but it's a toy.

Short trips are more damaging than occasional usage for long trips, although a car parked outside for weeks without moving may develop problems like seized brake calipers.

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - SLO76

My MX-5 only does about 1,500 miles a year but they are all good runs (over 10 miles, usually 40-60 miles) and it is properly mothballed in winter - garaged immediately after a hard run in dry weather, wheels on tyre savers, handbrake off, fuel stabliser in a full tank of fresh fuel, battery on trickle charge, dehumifidifier crystals in cabin.

It is a bit irksome taking it for an annual 12,500 mile service when it has barely done 10% of that milage, but it's a toy.

Short trips are more damaging than occasional usage for long trips, although a car parked outside for weeks without moving may develop problems like seized brake calipers.

A fantastic buy for the next owner when you come to sell. Good to see a car being so well cared for. I’m particularly fond of MX5’s, they’re a great little toy.
Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - John F

My MX-5 only does about 1,500 miles a year but they are all good runs (over 10 miles, usually 40-60 miles) and it is properly mothballed in winter - garaged immediately after a hard run in dry weather, wheels on tyre savers, handbrake off, fuel stabliser in a full tank of fresh fuel, battery on trickle charge, dehumifidifier crystals in cabin.

It is a bit irksome taking it for an annual 12,500 mile service when it has barely done 10% of that milage, but it's a toy.

A fantastic buy for the next owner when you come to sell. Good to see a car being so well cared for. I’m particularly fond of MX5’s, they’re a great little toy.

MX5s have come - rotted - and gone. I hope it lasts as long as my 1980 TR7 has - never mothballed, 'restored' or 'off the road' in its life. One poster has doubted its existence. (BBV 800V - you are welcome to view its recent MoT history). Very sad that our incompetent motor industry (can't even make a decent gear box and still recommending annual oil changes in all circumstances, etc ) could not capitalise on the burgeoning international market for such cars.

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - SLO76
“MX5s have come - rotted - and gone. I hope it lasts as long as my 1980 TR7 has - never mothballed, 'restored' or 'off the road' in its life.“

Yours is in a minority of survivors though John. TR7’s were never particularly well made but they were mechanically simple and therefore quite robust. It was however a retrograde step compared to the fuel injected TR6’s or Dolomite 16v Sprint.

The MX5 is bad for rust, even Mk III’s are crumbling if not cared for but mechanically they’re almost bombproof and to drive they’d run circles round a TR7. Look after one and it can last as long as you want it to.

To be fair though I’ve only had the privilege of driving a TR7 once which was a 1977 coupe V8 conversion which was in 1996 and the owner wanted to part ex it for something modern, I can’t even remember what he was looking at. But I can say that the thing was absolutely rotten both bodily and to drive with poor body control, heavy steering and a weak synchromesh on almost every gear. It wasn’t a good example though and the chap was horrified by my realistic valuation of £800... he wanted £5k!!!

Prices are proof of desirability and TR7’s despite their rarity have never reached substantial values while early Mk I MX5’s are already hitting strong money with some mint examples exceeding £10k already despite not being particularly old.

Edited by SLO76 on 07/02/2018 at 12:52

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - John F
“MX5s have come - rotted - and gone. I hope it lasts as long as my 1980 TR7 has - never mothballed, 'restored' or 'off the road' in its life.“

Yours is in a minority of survivors though John. TR7’s were never particularly well made

Yes they were - when they brought the production line down to Canley. Unfortunately owing to the strength of the pound they were then costing as much as a Porsche 924 in the USA.

I’ve only had the privilege of driving a TR7 once which was a 1977 coupe V8 conversion ....... weak synchromesh on almost every gear.

The early Speke built 'coupes' were indeed dreadful cars - I hope that conversion included the LT77 gear box - the original 4 speed Morris Marina box wouldn't have lasted long! I agree - they should have used the Dolly Sprint head - I had one back in the 70s - great car.

Mazda 6 Tourer - Buying a car that's done only 3000 miles a year? - Engineer Andy
Short trips are more damaging than occasional usage for long trips, although a car parked outside for weeks without moving may develop problems like seized brake calipers.

Yep, that's what happens, to a slightly lesser degree, with my Mazda3 when I don't use it so often, as I've done in the past 9 months after giving up my job. I actually run it once week for a 25 mile round trip to the next big town for shopping just to keep the battery topped up and the brakes from binding badly (not always effective), especially in the current cold and/or damp conditions; less so as the weather gets warmer (I have stretched it to once every 3 weeks in the height of summer, but normally 2 weeks).

I too do 99% of my trips over 10 miles and I concur that it helps - in some years when I've been commuting by train, I've only done 2k miles and still had the 12.5k mile service. Still, far cheaper to do that then having to spend oodles on several new parts and maybe a new car years earlier than should be the case.

 

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