Double white lines - DieselBoy

Hello all,

If a main road with double white lines. Turning right into a business entrance would involve crossing the lines - I understand this is legal according to the TSRaGD 2002 s.26. What doesn't seem to be covered anywhere, however, is exiting the business. Is it legal to turn right onto the main road, crossing the double white lines?

Ta!

Double white lines - RT

Highway Code Rule 129

Double white lines where the line nearest you is solid. This means you MUST NOT cross or straddle it unless it is safe and you need to enter adjoining premises or a side road. You may cross the line if necessary, provided the road is clear, to pass a stationary vehicle, or overtake a pedal cycle, horse or road maintenance vehicle, if they are travelling at 10 mph (16 km/h) or less.
Laws RTA 1988 sect 36 & TSRGD regs 10 & 26

Double white lines - DieselBoy

Thank you. That covers entering a adjoining premises or side road, but not exiting. That is what I am interested in.

Double white lines - John Boy

Do you have a particular location in mind, DB?

Double white lines - DieselBoy

I do, but I'm not technically minded enough to link to it!

Double white lines - Dwight Van Driver

There is now a plethora of law with the introduction in March of the Traffic Signs and General Directions 2016 which I find hard to read unlike the previous well set out 2002 Directions. Progress??????????????

I would gather that this applies:

Viewed in the direction of travel, if the line closest to you is continuous, you must not cross or straddle it (except to turn into OR OUT OF A SIDE ROAD OR PROPERTY, avoid a stationary vehicle blocking the lane, or overtake a pedal cycle, horse or road works vehicle moving at not more than 10 mph)

Which makes sense other wise one could travel miles until a suitable turning.

dvd

Double white lines - DieselBoy

Lovely, thank you.

Double white lines - Bromptonaut

I you look at it purposively, the solid line is intended to prohibit overtakes, or rather those that cross the line. The line also prohibits parking/waiting etc. Reletivley recently exemptions were added for slow moving traffic, including cyclists.

Not intnded to prohbit, or otherwise interfere with, joining or leaving the road.

Double white lines - Wackyracer

The problem with rules like this is they are dependent on personal interpretation. While some will see it the way Brompt does, others might rightly or wrongly read it another way.

Really the HWC should be written in such a way as to leave no doubts about what is and is not acceptable.

Double white lines - RT

I you look at it purposively, the solid line is intended to prohibit overtakes, or rather those that cross the line. The line also prohibits parking/waiting etc. Reletivley recently exemptions were added for slow moving traffic, including cyclists.

Not intnded to prohbit, or otherwise interfere with, joining or leaving the road.

I thought the exceptions for slow moving vehicles was always there - but recently they changed the definition to "pedal cycle, horse or road maintenance vehicle, if they are travelling at 10 mph or less"

Which begs the question - is it legal to cross double white lines to pass a pedestrian, mobility scooter or broken-down vehicle moving slowly - assuming it's safe to do so ?

Double white lines - focussed

"Which begs the question - is it legal to cross double white lines to pass a pedestrian, mobility scooter or broken-down vehicle moving slowly - assuming it's safe to do so ?"

Yes - it always has been within the law to overtake said vehicles by crossing a solid white line - as long as they are travelling at less than ten mph.

Double white lines - Engineer Andy

"Which begs the question - is it legal to cross double white lines to pass a pedestrian, mobility scooter or broken-down vehicle moving slowly - assuming it's safe to do so ?"

Yes - it always has been within the law to overtake said vehicles by crossing a solid white line - as long as they are travelling at less than ten mph.

Bit of a bummer with the modern 'Froome-froome' cyclists travelling well in excess of 10mph, just not enough for motor vehicles to make decent progress when behind them. Much easier in days of yore with the odd day-tripper or two or district nurse travelling at low speed, rather than 'packs' of (peletons?) Team SKY wannabees travelling at 20-30mph on 40-60mph narrow, twisty roads who don't pull over to let other road users pass. (I am a cyclist too BTW).

Locals (as I frequently find holidaying in Cornwall) are far more clued up to being attentive and helpful if travelling along in slow-moving vehicles (including people who are having difficulty finding their way), on horseback or walking than the rest of us.

 

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