Builders' radios - galileo

Last week some so-called builders supposed to be extending the house next door-but-one had a radio turned up full volume as they were messing about at the far end of the garden 25 yards away.

I went round and asked why they were inflicting this noise on local residents, the answer was "we're working".

Apart from the fact they don't seem to have laid a single brick in two days, I fail to see why so many of these clowns need a constant background of Radio 1 (or worse).

After my Mr Angry rant they turned it off, no doubt they'll be back tomorrow (and for weeks on end), suggestions welcome as to best course of action, short of 12-bore shotgun.

Builders' radios - RobJP

Council, environmental dept, statutrory nuisance enforcement.

Or speak to the people who own the house, if possible. If they tell you to get stuffed, then point out to them that having complaints against them will be something they'd have to divulge to a future buyer, and might reduce the value of their home.

Then ask them if they still want you to get stuffed, or if they're going to do somethng about it.

Builders' radios - gordonbennet

When my late brother lived in Winchmore Hill he always quipped how cheap it was to live there because you didn't need your own radio.

Those in power like a constant barrage of subtle propaganda in order to keep the proles from thinking their own dangerous independent thoughts, but really modern radio like its telly equivalent has reached an all time low, its utter dirge, with schoolgirl/boy soundalike presenters talking the same rubbish on almost every station, yes including radio 2 (state broadcaster brainwashing channel extraordinaire) which i can longer bear listening to...and don't get me started on the garbage that are radio adverts, each one i'm unfortunate enough to hear is banal enough for to make a mental note never to buy a single client's product as long as i live.

Edited by gordonbennet on 08/05/2016 at 21:57

Builders' radios - elekie&a/c doctor

If you can hear it and they are playing the radio during their business operation,then they probably need one of these.www.ppluk.com/I-Play-Music/Businesses/Why-do-I-nee.../

Builders' radios - Dogfuzz

Thoroughly irritating and thoughtless!

Were the builders employed by a company or "working" independently?...if the former ( and you can politely find this out by asking the owner of the house)-then that could be the way forward.

Nevertheless-It is bad manners to undertake building/gardening/exterior decorating work without advising close neighbours that there could be noise and dispruption occuring.Suggest this is your line diplomatic approach.

Builders' radios - concrete

RobJP is right on the money. I had this problem at my previous house. Two doors along were having a garage built, although at the time I though it was a disco!!. I politely asked the builders to turn down the radio, which they did, then every so often it would increase again until back to square one. I told my neighbour of the nuisance and he seemed reluctant to tackle the issue. So I contacted the local authority environmental health and they came round to visit. The result, total silence for the duration of the building work. I don't know what was said to the builders, but it worked.

Cheers Concrete

Builders' radios - Engineer Andy

Whilst its a quite different environment working on a full-blown building site to doing some building work or painting on a domestic property, having a radio (or other device spewing out music or talk radio or TV at any volume) is now considered to be unsafe, given that it distracts the workers from the task at hand, which often involves them having to concentrate on doing the job properly and safely.

As such, radios are banned from building sites (including whether refurbishment work is taking place) for those reasons, as well as because they are often a nuciance to other people living and working in the vicinity. Needless to say, many contractors still ignore this and have to be frequently 'reminded' of their obligations on both fronts.

Many seem to still think they are, along with 'white van men' and 'highway contractors' (you know - the endless stretches of cones on the road with workmen 'in the van' and never doing any work, a law unto themselves as to their conduct when 'on the job', including days of tea breaks and discussing last night's footie match/drunken escapade, punctuated by occasional work.

Builders' radios - concrete

Well Andy, quite a swipe at contractors, I feel your pain! However to some extent I agree that small contractors doing general building and maintainance do present a problem and do tend to plough their own furrow, much to our general annoyance. Larger contractors however are a different animal altogether. The projects I worked on were all very large with hundreds of men on site on occasions. Correctly, radios, even small personal ones with earphones and mobile telephones were banned from site for the reason you mentioned. Nothing really to do with the noise pollution that the environmental health people are concerned with. In any event it all comes down to simple consideration for others and how they are affected by your actions. Cheers Concrete

Builders' radios - Engineer Andy

Well Andy, quite a swipe at contractors, I feel your pain! However to some extent I agree that small contractors doing general building and maintainance do present a problem and do tend to plough their own furrow, much to our general annoyance. Larger contractors however are a different animal altogether. The projects I worked on were all very large with hundreds of men on site on occasions. Correctly, radios, even small personal ones with earphones and mobile telephones were banned from site for the reason you mentioned. Nothing really to do with the noise pollution that the environmental health people are concerned with. In any event it all comes down to simple consideration for others and how they are affected by your actions. Cheers Concrete

Saying that (i.e. on commercial projects the ban on radios etc not being about noise pollution), quite often the site being worked on is an active building (i.e. an extension or refurbishment of part of a building/complex) and thus occupants (staff members, clients/customers, school/univeristy pupils, residents and patients) do not appreciate loud music or talk radio and 'banter' throughout the day.

As such, other than for safety reasons, music and banter (amongst other 'coa***' behaviour) is banned and quite often opertaives (and sometimes entire contractor firms) are thrown off sites for sever or multiple breaches. To be honest, it can also 'distract' operatives (whether on a proper commercial or domestic project) from actually doing their work as well. Some very well-known sites (including a very famous one in central London) are known to be very strict about such things.

Builders' radios - concrete

Couldn't agree more Andy. On a huge hospital complex site I worked on, a worker was crushed by a mobile crane driving into him. He had strayed off the marked pathway and could not hear the crane or any warnings because he had sneaked onto site and was listening to his personal stereo through tiny earplugs. The price of being a music lover eh! Cheers Concrete

Builders' radios - Dan Groves

II think you might have watched a few too many episodes of 'Rogue Traders'.

I work on building sites every day. From multi million pound projects down to an hours work in someone's home. Whilst these characters still exist, they are a dying breed. A site is generally a very professional environment these days. I find your ridiculously sweeping generalisation quite offensive

As for radios, I really dont see the problem, as long as they're used sensibly. Once again it's a case of HSE forcing a blanket ban on the industry because it's easier than looking at individual sites (or even classifying sites), and judging each on merit.

It's also worth noting that a radio on site has a massive impact on morale, which as a result has an impact on productivity and (in my opinion) operatives general wellbeing.

Edited by Dan Groves on 11/01/2018 at 12:13

Builders' radios - concrete

I am sorry you are offended Dan. I thought most of the points made were quite specific and not generalised nor sweeping. HSE had little to do with the H & S policy on site. The HSE guidlines are always considered but it is the main contractor who sets the H & S policy. If they perceive radios, personal stereo/earplugs as a potential danger, particularly with mobile plant around the site, then they decide the policy for that site. Similarly mobiles were not allowed on many sites because of the potential for distraction. Communication on site was via Walkie-Talkie radio. Also on most large sites I worked on, random drug and alcohol testing were common. Some felt it was an intrusion on their personal freedom but most were supportive. Especially if you considered some men were operating potentially dangerous equipment, so I would rather they were sober and fully compus mentus. HSE gone mad or common sense??

I agree that if people are working in a small commercial or domestic environment then some music often helps the day go by. It is all a matter of degree and someone has to decide if it's appropriate or not. I have been in that position and take each case on its merits. On smaller jobs I had no objection to a more relaxed approach, but on large sites a controlled approach was always the safer option. You can make systems foolproof, until you get a clever fool!!!

Cheers Concrete

Builders' radios - Dan Groves

Sorry, I don't think it was your post I meant to reply to! I'm new here! Drugs and alcohol testing I'm fine with. I'm generally ok with anything that makes sense and improves things on site. Im so happy with the view (Not yours it would seem!) that we're all lazy, obnoxious drunkards!

I guess I'd just like common sense to return really!

Apologies for the confusion!

Builders' radios - scot22

This is obviously subjective. In my younger days I did some disc jockeying and was happy in noise. Now I can't stand it ! I appreciate that radio can make work more enjoyable for some people. Happy people usually do better work. Yes, I believe work should feel enjoyable and worthwhile.

As said common sense is needed. If we could all be more considerate of each then society would be much improved.

Builders' radios - concrete

You are right Dan. Some people outside the industry do percieve the average site operative in the way you decribed. So far from the truth in my, quite considerable, experience. As Scot says it is down to common sense. Where it gets everyones goat, is when there appears to be no rational thought or reason for a rule to be applied. This then, just like bad law, brings all rules into question. Glad we got that straightened out.

Cheers Concrete

Builders' radios - Eliza357

I work on building sites every day. From multi million pound projects down to an hours work in someone's home. Whilst these characters still exist, they are a dying breed. A site is generally a very professional environment these days. I find your ridiculously sweeping generalisation quite offensive

As for radios, I really dont see the problem, as long as they're used sensibly. Once again it's a case of HSE forcing a blanket ban on the industry because it's easier than looking at individual sites (or even classifying sites), and judging each on merit.

Edited by Avant on 28/01/2019 at 09:35

 

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