Water V Coke - Dynamic Dave
This is really an eye opener.... Water or Coke? We all know that water is important but I've never seen it written down like this before.

WATER:

1. 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated.

2. In 37% of Americans, the thirst mechanism is so weak that it is often mistaken for hunger.

3. Even MILD dehydration will slow down one's metabolism as much as 3%.

4. One glass of water will shut down midnight hunger pangs for almost 100% of the dieters studied in a University of Washington study.

5. Lack of water, the #1 trigger of daytime fatigue.

6. Preliminary research indicates that 8-10 glasses of water a day could significantly ease back and joint pain for up to 80% of sufferers.

7. A mere 2% drop in body water can trigger fuzzy short-term memory, trouble with basic math, and difficulty focusing on the computer screen or on a printed page.

8. Drinking 5 glasses of water daily decreases the risk of colon
cancer by 45%, plus it can slash the risk of breast cancer by 79%, and one is 50% less likely to develop bladder cancer.

And now for the properties of COKE:

1. In many states (in the USA) the highway patrol carries two gallons of Coke in the truck to remove blood from the highway after a car accident. [1]

2. You can put a T-bone steak in a bowl of coke and it will be gone in two days.

3. To clean a toilet: Pour a can of Coca-Cola into the toilet bowl and let the "real thing" sit for one hour, then flush clean. The citric acid in Coke removes stains from vitreous china.

4. To remove rust spots from chrome car bumpers: Rub the bumper with a rumpled-up piece of aluminium foil dipped in Coca-Cola. [1]

5. To clean corrosion from car battery terminals: Pour a can of
Coca-Cola over the terminals to bubble away the corrosion. [1]

6. To loosen a rusted bolt: Applying a cloth soaked in Coca-Cola to the rusted bolt for several minutes. [1]

7. To bake a moist ham: Empty a can of Coca-Cola into the baking pan, wrap the ham in aluminium foil, and bake. Thirty minutes before the ham is finished, remove the foil, allowing the drippings to mix with the Coke for a sumptuous brown gravy.

8. To remove grease from clothes: Empty a can of coke into a load of greasy clothes, add detergent, and run through a regular cycle. The Coca-Cola will help loosen grease stains.

9. It will also clean road haze from your windshield. [1]

For Your Info

1. The active ingredient in Coke is phosphoric acid. Its pH is 2.8. It will dissolve a nail in about 4 days. Phosphoric acid also leaches calcium from bones and is a major contributor to the rising increase in osteoporosis.

2. To carry Coca-Cola syrup (the concentrate) the commercial truck must use the Hazardous material place cards reserved for Highly corrosive materials. [1]

3. The distributors of coke have been using it to clean the engines of their trucks for about 20 years! [1]


Now the question is, would you like a glass of water or coke?


[1] Motoring connections.
Water V Coke - CM
Does the same apply to diet coke?
Water V Coke - Robin
The harmful acidic properties of Coke are unfortunately an Urban Myth, oft repeated on the WWW. True, Coke does contain Citric acid and phosphoric acid as well as carbonic acid (this last in common with all carbonated drinks: CO2 + H2O = Carbonic acid). However, the important thing to consider is the concentration of the acid. There is no way that a fizzy drink has a pH of 2.8 - this would make it a very strong acid. The concentration of phosphoric acid in Coke is around 0.055% (cf the 1.09% acid concentration in an orange) which gives it a pH much higher than the mythical 2.8.

Follow this link for some photos of what happens when you put a steak in coke for a couple of days:
www.clevermag.com/investigations/coke.htm

By the way, ham cooked in Coke is surpisingly good. Nigella Lawson gives a recipe in one of her books.
Urban Myths - Onetap
Yes, sadly another urban myth.

See

www.snopes.com/cokelore/acid.asp

A useful site for checking out such yarns. Snopes says;

"Many of the entries above are just simple household tips involving Coca-Cola. That you can cook and clean with Coke is relatively meaningless from a safety standpoint -- you can use a wide array of common household substances (including water) for the same purposes; that doesn't necessarily make them dangerous. The fact is that all carbonated soft drinks contain carbonic acid, which is moderately useful for tasks such as removing stains and dissolving rust deposits (although plain s**a water is much better for such purposes than Coca-Cola or other soft drinks, as it doesn't leave a sticky sugar residue behind). Carbonic acid is relatively weak, however, and people have been drinking carbonated water for many years with no detrimental effects.

Coca-Cola does contain small amounts of citric acid (from the orange, lemon, and lime oils in its formula) and phosphoric acid. However, all the insinuations about the dangers these acids might pose to people who drink Coca-Cola ignore a simple concept familiar to any first-year chemistry student: concentration. Coca-Cola contains less citric acid than orange juice does, and the concentration of phosphoric acid in Coke is far too small (a mere 11 to 13 grams per gallon of syrup, or about 0.20 to 0.30 per cent of the total formula) to cause harm. The only people who proffer the ridiculous statements that Coca-Cola will dissolve a steak, a tooth, or a nail in a day or two are people who have never actually tried any of these things, because they just don't happen. (Anyone who conducts these experiments will find himself at the end of two days with a whole tooth, a whole nail, and one very soggy t-bone.)

The next time you're stopped by a highway patrolman, try asking him if he's ever cleaned blood stains off a highway with Coca-Cola. If you're lucky, by the time he stops laughing he'll have forgotten about the citation he was going to give you."

The pH of the phosphoric acid may be 2.8, but that of Coke is around 6 to 7. I checked it with litmus paper. I wouldn't put aluminium foil in Coke for cooking purposes.
Urban Myths - joe
Coke is remarkably effective at cleaning certain types of golf club. I leave my old brass putter overnight in a bowl of coke, and it comes out shiny and new!
Urban Myths - Dude - {P}
It is`nt the acidic content that concerns me with these soft drink products, but the high sugar concentrations. Is it any wonder that the incidence of diabetes amongst young children is going through the roof.???
Urban Myths - Dynamic Dave
Before Mark tells me off for encouraging you lot to post off topic, can someone bring this subject back to a motoring theme please? HINT HINT
Urban Myths - Baskerville
I was involved in an argument with a doctor about this a while back and he claimed that the sugar/diabetes link has been disproved. Apparently the figures were muddied by the fact that overweight people tend to eat a lot of sugar. It's now thought that obesity, not suger per se, is a major cause of diabetes. But back to motoring. Doesn't carbonic acid also protect against rust as well as removing it?
Motoring Coke link - No Do$h
If you cook your clutch in the middle of a rally (FiF, take note) you can regain some friction by pouring coke all over the clutch face.

A mate of mine swears blind that he did this on the Acropolis rally about 15 years back. He and the co-driver always had a couple of large bottles of the stuff in the car. Allegedly.
Motoring Coke link - Flat in Fifth
If you cook your clutch in the middle of a rally
(FiF, take note) you can regain some friction by pouring coke
all over the clutch face.
A mate of mine swears blind that he did this on
the Acropolis rally about 15 years back. He and the
co-driver always had a couple of large bottles of the stuff
in the car. Allegedly.


Norman Masters who was, at the time, Roger Clark's personal mechanic used to swear by this technique. Only time I actually saw it done was on Makinen's car, Timo not Tommi BTW.
Motoring Coke link - No Do$h
Norman Masters who was, at the time, Roger Clark's personal mechanic
used to swear by this technique. Only time I actually saw
it done was on Makinen's car, Timo not Tommi BTW.

Good lord! I've always taken it with a pinch of salt.

Any other soft-drink related motoring tips out there?
Urban Myths - Mark (RLBS)
Not much motoring related here.

If it doesn\'t get motoring related it will disappear in the near future.

Mark.
Urban Myths - Onetap
The active ingredient in Jenolite rust remover is phosphoric acid. Jenolite's pH is 2 to 3. The pH scale is logarithmic, so this suggests (I'm not a chemist) that this stuff is about 1,000 times more concentrated than Coke. The rust removing effects of Coke are probably similary diluted; about as feeble as this post's connection to motoring.

I have heard of carbonated drinks (beer in that case) being used as a fire extinguisher; shake the bottle and point.

Urban Myths - Martin Devon
Right. To get this this thread back on topic. Was it a Coke bottle??? (Cortina Mk. III)

Regards.
Urban Myths - Ben79
My dad claims to have used defizzed coke as brake fluid after boiling his away in the alps many years ago.

The coke was still there when he sold the car many months later....

Ben
Urban Myths - Robert Fleming
When I had my wisdom teeth out, the dentist gave them to me in formaldehyde. I put one in coke for a few days to see if it would dissolve.

It didn't. Stained it a nasty brown colour though, and 8 years of soaking back in the formaldehyde pot hasn't dissolved any of the discolouring.
 

Value my car