Tyre pressure gauges - scot22

I use an automative ring tyre inflator. It has an integrated pressure gauge. I wonder how do I know it is accurate ? Which is the most accurate tyre pressure gauge ? Sometimes I lose a little air when disconnecting. Is there a way to avoid this ?

Tyre pressure gauges - RobJP

I have a SnapOn pressure guage, which was not cheap when I bought it about 2002 (£50 or so, I think). But it's very high quality.

I also have a 'Ring' inflator. I fill to 7 psi (reason in a minute) above my target, remove the inflator, and then reduce pressure back to target using the pressure guage. The Ring inflator seems to read 3-4 psi high compared to the SnapOn, so that gives me enough to lose a bit in removing the inflator, and still reduce to target.

Tyre pressure gauges - Dwight Van Driver

If I recall correctly Trading Standards used to go round air lines at Garages to certify their correctness.

So check with a cerified outlet into your tyre and then use your purchased guage....

dvd

Tyre pressure gauges - daveyjp
One of the old school pen style analogue gauges. Cost about £2 and after checking following a tyre change it appears to be quite accurate.

The air temperature has quite an effect on pressure, so unless you check daily the pressure is only accurate on the day you check it.
Tyre pressure gauges - scot22

Thanks - the posts are VERY helpful. I'll now look to spend some Christmas money ! Excellent tip re loss of air pressure. Thanks again

Tyre pressure gauges - Andrew-T

I recently replaced an elderly footpump with a knackered gauge with a Ring 12v compressor. I have always checked pressures with my trusty pen-type gauge, and the Ring gives pretty similar readings. I'm not sure whether service-station figures would be any more reliable.

Tyre pressure gauges - skidpan

Had a dial type gauge for 20 years or so now. Was expensive at the time but when I have checked it against other similar gauges (not recently) it has always been spot on. Also have a couple of pen type gauges, considering how cheap they were these are pretty close to the dial type gauge, probably more robust but I find that in certain valve positions and valve types it can be hit and miss getting a reading.

Gauges on footpumps are typically rubbish and I have never had any luck whatsoever with electric pumps, if you run them too long they simply burn out the motor.

Tyre pressure gauges - John Boy

Also have a couple of pen type gauges, considering how cheap they were these are pretty close to the dial type gauge, probably more robust but I find that in certain valve positions and valve types it can be hit and miss getting a reading.

That was exactly my experience. Earlier this year someone showed a little electronic gauge which really impressed me. Then I found this survey

www.autoexpress.co.uk/accessories-tyres/85474/best...t

and bought the winner in Halfords. It works well.

Tyre pressure gauges - scot22

Thanks for these valuable posts. I will buy after Christmas now. When knowledge is shared on this forum it is very impressive.

Happy Christmas all and may the New Year bring all you wish yourselves.

Tyre pressure gauges - Galaxy

I myself have been using the Michelin Digital Tyre Pressure Gauge for the past 6 years. It really is the Rolls Royce of pressure gauges, believe me! They are quite expensive and some people might not want to spend that amount of money on a gauge. But I myself don't mind the cost when buying something as well designed and well made as this. It's well worth the money.

Since having mine I've also recommended this gauge to friends of mine, who, in turn, have also been out and bought them. Complete satisfaction all round!

www.halfords.com/motoring/garage-equipment/tyre-in...e

Tyre pressure gauges - Hamsafar

I had a years old dial guage that finally packed up. I would take the pressure and the needle would 'sink' after disconnecting insated of remaining in situe.

I bought one of these for under £4 delivered,

www.dx.com/p/1-lcd-digital-tire-pressure-gauge-yel...3

it is accurate to the shiny new digital one in a SAINSBURY'S station and that's good enough for me, built in light and illuminated display too. God bless the Chinese.

Edited by Hamsafar on 24/12/2014 at 17:31

Tyre pressure gauges - scot22

Thanks for these. As I've said previously this forum is a fund of information.

Tyre pressure gauges - Wackyracer

I have a few digital tyre pressure gauges and they are all accurate. An RAC one, A professional one from MAC tools and a cheap £2 one from Tesco at Gallows corner.

Some years ago I had a sykes pickavant dial type one that was pretty good until someone used it on a tyre that had a pressure higher than it was designed to read and it never returned to zero after that.

I would never buy that Michelin one - The price is far too much.

Tyre pressure gauges - alastairq

The observation that actual pressure within a tyre depends very much on the tyre's temperature.[and the ambient temp, for that matter]....is an important one.

I have several different [yet all were deemed 'accurate'.by comparison articles, etc] types/ makes of pressure gauge...including a hokme-made one, using an old brass tyre inflator end from a garage sale, with an ancient gas pressure gauge screwed into teh end.....I required low pressure gauges, so I have two that read between zero and 30 psi....the other being a shock-proof low pressure gauge from ...I think, Demon Tweeks?

However,both read within 2 psi of each other...and none of rhe other gauges read much more than that.

The problem with gauges is, how accurately can we read them, using mark one eyeballs?

The more important issue is to get the ratio of tyre pressures, front to rear, correct.....but use the same gauge. Thus, the actual pressures, whilst maybe a psi or two up or down from 'real',,will maintain the same ratio....so if there is, for example, a 2 psi difference, front to rear, that will remain the same....

It is the ratio that dictates the handling characteristics of the car..[assuming all other unintentional variables are allowed for?]

Tyre pressure gauges - skidpan

The observation that actual pressure within a tyre depends very much on the tyre's temperature.[and the ambient temp, for that matter]....is an important one.

That is why manufacturers always quote cold pressures.

Tyre pressure gauges - Andrew-T

<< That is why manufacturers always quote cold pressures. >>

Quite so, but there is 'cold' and 'colder'. Just now, with outside temps a little above freezing, an inflated tyre will read several psi lower than the same tyre in midsummer. Even as a trained scientist I am still a little surprised by the noticeable pressure drop when the weather turns colder - when the absolute temperature may have dropped by 8°, or only 3%.

Tyre pressure gauges - RT

<< That is why manufacturers always quote cold pressures. >>

Quite so, but there is 'cold' and 'colder'. Just now, with outside temps a little above freezing, an inflated tyre will read several psi lower than the same tyre in midsummer. Even as a trained scientist I am still a little surprised by the noticeable pressure drop when the weather turns colder - when the absolute temperature may have dropped by 8°, or only 3%.

And as a trained scientist, you'll realise that the apparent tyre pressure shown on a tyre gauge is the pressure ABOVE ambient air pressure.

It's measuring and maintaining the differential that's important - easier to accept scientifically if the word "cold" is replaced by "ambient".

Tyre pressure gauges - Andrew-T

Can anyone suggest what kind of percentage variation there can be to a maker's recommended running pressure before there is a perceptible change in driving characteristics? This obviously depends on many mechanical factors to do with the tyre's and the car's construction, but equally obviously there are lots of cars out there running with significantly under-inflated tyres?

Tyre pressure gauges - RT

Can anyone suggest what kind of percentage variation there can be to a maker's recommended running pressure before there is a perceptible change in driving characteristics? This obviously depends on many mechanical factors to do with the tyre's and the car's construction, but equally obviously there are lots of cars out there running with significantly under-inflated tyres?

From experimentation, only a couple of psi difference is needed to start noticing differences - particularly in front:rear balance - but like many things it depends on your level of mechanical empathy, real or imaginary!

My SUV has recommended pressures of 33:33 - it handles more to my taste at 36:33 with less understeer but the ride is noticeably harsher particularly in winter when the sidewalls are stiffer due to lower temperatures - tyre wear across the treads is more even at 34:32.

So I tend to run 33:33 in winter and 36:33 in summer.

Edited by RT on 27/12/2014 at 10:30

 

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