Hyundai i10 - Hyundai i10 clutch gone after 15000 miles - Chirpy99

Hi I just thought Id post up about my 62 plate i10 which has let me down today with clutch failure . Its only done 15000 miles whilst driving home the clutch started to slip and I was struggling to make any momentum, I thought Id get home but I ened up aout 6miles from home at the side . Called the Hyundai breakdown who sent the RAC I waited for an hour, because the dealer was open they took the car there where theyve said they will look at it tomorrow and report back to me. Its still under warranty so it shouldnt be any cost to me.

15000 miles is ridiculously short for the life of a clutch, any other owners had similar problems ?

Hyundai i10 - Hyundai i10 clutch gone after 15000 miles - Cyd

, any other owners had similar problems ?

How can we know? We don't know what your fault is yet. Dealers looking at it tomorrow, you said.

Hyundai i10 - Hyundai i10 clutch gone after 15000 miles - daveyjp
Premature cluctch failure is not an unknown problem on Hyundais. Don't be so confident that the warranty will be your saviour. Depending on the dealer you could be in for a battle as a clutch can be killed in a lot less than 15,000 miles.

forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=3747...h

We had an i20 and the clutch and transmission never felt right.
Hyundai i10 - Hyundai i10 clutch gone after 15000 miles - gordonbennet

I keep reading, and family have had this problem too of short clutch life on modern cars, where these often mature drivers have sometimes been driving for 30 years or more and never needed a new clutch.

I have no direct knowledge but several things stand out to me from my previous work, car transporting.

Modern clutches are very light, and seem 'soft', this is probably design to make them light to drive, bite point not as precise as cars were years ago, softer materials for smoother drive?

Gearing on some cars seems too high to me in first and reverse gears, leading to excess revs being needed every time you move off.

Engines very easy to stall now again demanding higher revs in order not to stall, but some excellent engines that buck this trend, Aygo 107 C1 in particular though early examples with a small clutch (size increased later) would fail early at around 40k miles.

In the rush to give these cars that necessary ''refinement'' i keep hearing about (DMF anyone?), have they made them so fragile that they are in some cases no longer fit for use.

Drivers, thorny subject this...how come we managed for donkeys years with a bog standard handbrake and a normal clutch, now cars are increasingly festooned with electric parking brakes and hill hold devices, are drivers becoming so incompetent that they can't manage to control their vehicles properly without all this tat.

Indeed most new lorries are now automated manuals from hell, and belive thsi or not from this or next month (should have come in in January but legislation not in place i believe), a HGV driver can pass a test on an auto and that will qualify them for manual box too, quite frankly thats unbelievable enough, but the move to auto boxes seems to have come because far too modern lorry drivers can't drive any more either without destroying their clutches or use appropriate gears, as with many things drivers are increasingly taught to pass a test not to drive a lorry.

Sorry for the waffle, and no help at all to the OP, as usual, Hyundai i20 has been reported regularly as having a short clutch life, quite how Hyundai are performing over this i haven't a clue, maybe there is an improved replacement available.

Edited by gordonbennet on 08/04/2014 at 22:43

Hyundai i10 - Hyundai i10 clutch gone after 15000 miles - bathtub tom

I've heard of a disgruntled employee destroying a clutch within less than ten miles, I don't doubt it can be done!

Hyundai i10 - Hyundai i10 clutch gone after 15000 miles - Railroad.
Drivers, thorny subject this...how come we managed for donkeys years with a bog standard handbrake and a normal clutch, now cars are increasingly festooned with electric parking brakes and hill hold devices, are drivers becoming so incompetent that they can't manage to control their vehicles properly without all this tat.

Simple answer, marketing.
Modern car manufacturers can no longer come up with anything new to improve the motor car. In fact apart from the safety aspect cars are no better now than they were 25 years ago, but modern cars are now loaded with bells and whistles to give us the perception that they are, and that the manufacturer is innovative and moving forward, which we know is business b*******. Today's ever more strict emission requirements are the reason why cars have so many engine management problems, and the fact is they just don't meet our everyday needs anymore. Cars that do stop/start short journeys will be problematic. The days of a mass produced car that's repairable and long lasting are behind us. And it isn't going to change any time soon.
Hyundai i10 - Hyundai i10 clutch gone after 15000 miles - skidpan

No manufacturers warranty covers a clutch for wear for one simple reason, there are some right muppets out there who can destroy a clutch in no time. A couple of winters ago we had a chap at work whose clutch went within 6 months of buying a new car. usual story, never ever needed a new clutch, definitely not my driving. Once stripped clutch was burned to a crisp. He then admitted slipping the clutch for some considerable time when stuck in snow, his fault.

If its a manufacturing fault it will be covered but there is no way of knowing until the cars apart.

The days of a mass produced car that's repairable and long lasting are behind us. And it isn't going to change any time soon.

Regarding the above comment I think that anyone who writes such nonsense needs to take a reality check. Cars today are way more reliable than they were 30, 40 or 50 years ago and they are repairable but like it always has done it takes money to sort. Main difference is that years ago a bloke with a big hammer could fix most things, now it needs a computer and some inteligence, a feature many mechanics lack.

The last truly unreliable car I owned was a new 1978 Triumph Spitfire, the mechanics failed to fix that despite it being as simple as a car could be.

Hyundai i10 - Hyundai i10 clutch gone after 15000 miles - Railroad.
Firstly I said 25 years ago, not 30, 40 or 50, but was a 1987 Vauxhall Cavalier SRi any less reliable or lacking in performance from an equivalent model today? The answer is no it wasn't. If you think otherwise then perhaps you need a reality check. I spent years as a patrol for each if the two major motoring organisations, and in so doing saw problems first hand at the roadside. I am not comparing a new car with a 25 year old car. Many old car reliability issues were self inflicted by the owner's failure to look after it properly. Modern cars fall to bits easily, and your argument that you need a computer to diagnose faults serves to prove you don't know much. Engines still work the same as they did 100 years ago. What has changed is the complex systems that run the engine. Electronic components don't tend to fail that often. It's still the mechanical limitations of an engine that leads to problems. This is because of the ever increasing strictness of the emission laws. The modern car is a mix of 19th century and 21st century technology in one box. Old cars were eventually killed by structural corrosion, modern cars don't last long enough to suffer that fate because everything else deteriorates first. This forum is full of people's experiences of them.
Hyundai i10 - Hyundai i10 clutch gone after 15000 miles - Railroad.

(Duplicate post)

Edited by Avant on 20/04/2014 at 23:14

Hyundai i10 - Hyundai i10 clutch gone after 15000 miles - Chirpy99

Hi here is the news on this car, it is now fixed with a new modified clutch and replacement anti roll bars as well. It took 6 days before I got it back. All covered by the warranty. I didnt ask too many questions when I went to collect her.

She drives well so far. Lets see how long this one lasts!!!!

Hyundai i10 - Hyundai i10 clutch gone after 15000 miles - Paul Harman

Hi

We have a 2012 i10 and clutch started slipping recently. If you try to talk to Hyundai about a slipping clutch they immediately say it must be wear and tear, suggest your driving style is at fault and therefore the problem is not covered under warranty. They wanted £660 to replace clutch so I went elsewhere. Local garage confirmed that an oil leak (input shaft oil seal) had contaminated the clutch. Hyundai insisted car had to be put back together so that they could take a look (too lazy to send someone round to other garage to take a look ). Hyundai eventually accepted that oil seal and clutch could be repaired under warranty but we are still out of pocket as we had to pay local garage for their investigation.

Hyundai i10 seems to have a poor reputation for wearing out clutches but I wonder how many are actually wear and tear and how many are due to a possible design fault with input shaft oil seal. If cars are within warranty Hyundai would appear to have a vested interest in blaming the problem on the clutch assembly / owner's driving style.

Hyundai i10 - Hyundai i10 clutch gone after 15000 miles - Anthony Nannini

This is very interesting. We took my wife's 63 plate i10 to the garage the day before yesterday, as there were small signs of a leak on the drive. I have just picked the car up (18000 miles on the clock). I was told that an input shaft seal had failed, causing a leak into the clutch, which they had replaced. Fortunately, it was all done under warranty, but in over 35 years of driving cars old and new, this is the first clutch replacement for either of us.

We are now wondering whether to get rid of the car before the 5 year warranty lapses , in case this is a design fault and happens again.

Hyundai i10 - Hyundai i10 clutch gone after 15000 miles - RT

This is very interesting. We took my wife's 63 plate i10 to the garage the day before yesterday, as there were small signs of a leak on the drive. I have just picked the car up (18000 miles on the clock). I was told that an input shaft seal had failed, causing a leak into the clutch, which they had replaced. Fortunately, it was all done under warranty, but in over 35 years of driving cars old and new, this is the first clutch replacement for either of us.

We are now wondering whether to get rid of the car before the 5 year warranty lapses , in case this is a design fault and happens again.

Keep it until a few months before the warranty expires - my Santa Fe needed engine/transmission rebuild at 3 year old so I got rid at 4yrs 8mths, just in case.

 

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