VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - Sunman

My Jan 2010 Tiguan suddenly lost all engine power (scary) and had to be towed by RAC to VW service dealer. Outcome was that the v-belt had partly "shredded" and a length of severed belt had whipped the cambelt, and knocked the timing out. Result - irreperable damage to the engine, and turbo charger also found faulty. This required a new engine and turbo charger at a cool £7200 !!

The vehicle had done 55,000 miles, been serviced only by VW franchise dealer, and belts had been ticked ok in the multipoint check just three weeks previously. Dealer reports this as a freak occurrance, and theorises that a small stone must have caught in the pulley, to cause the v belt to shred.

Dealer agreed to cover 50% of the cost as "goodwill" (the car is out of warranty), but I've still had to stump up £3600! I wrote to VW, who have looked into it, and say they've never come across anything like it, and will not add anything further to the dealer's offer as the cause was "external"(though the fact is the v belt failed for unknown reasons)

I feel very hard done by, having meticulously maintained the vehicle, and feel very disturbed that something like this can happen. I've lost confidence in the vehicle, and VW's concern for their customers..

Have I been treated fairly? Anyone had similar engine failure experience like this , and got better resolution/ compensation?

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - Ordovices

I cannot believe that anyone other than those who had something to gain from it would even consider that the small stone (a definition of small would be nice) could leap up, around the lower engine tray and come to rest in a pulley causing a belt to shred. The fact that this is a possibility sounds like a straw clutching exercise.

As the belt had been inspected and passed as OK, I would begin by asking what the criterion/criteria are for giving it the thumbs up, what measurement or characteristic applies to "pass".

Then confirm what the interval between inspections of the belt is.

The freak occurence could just as easily be a material failure of a service item which is not due replacement and has been passed as fit for continued use.

Given the cost you have borne, I would suggest speaking to an automotive engineer for a report, then consider SCC action for the balance.

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - elekie&a/c doctor

On the recent service,was the diesel fuel filter replaced.?Unfortunately on this model and other Golf variants,it is not unknown for the filter seal to leak after repacement and cause fuel to spray onto the poly vee belt.This in turn causes the belt to disintegrate and wind itself around the numerous pulleys on the engine and self destuct.hth

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - The-Mechanic

I'll second you on that doc. I had first hand experience of exactly that when a Saharan that had been serviced two weeks earlier at a well known chain of tyre and exhaust specialists threw its poly vee into the timing gear and destroyed the engine due to a leaking filter housing.

The Tiguan has a guard on the inner wing and a part undertray so the poly vee belt is pretty well protected against foreign bodies so I'd be dubious if this was the cause of the failiure. You would have to be very unlucky if this indeed was the cause. Had you noticed a smell of diesel after the service (assuming the fuel filter was changed) ?

Another thing to check is whether this model has had a recall for the fuel filter housing ? I know the Golf, Passat and Passat CC with the 2.0 TDi engines had a notice for this so its worth checking. If yours did have the same recall, was the poly vee belt replaced as it could have become contaminated with diesel and deteriorated the poly fee belt ?

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - Sunman

Yes, fuel filter changed in July. But car was back in again in October,for brakes, and the belts were again checked and reported ok. The v belt did not snap, or even detach , but had started to shred - and it was one of these lengths of shredded belt that whipped the cambelt and caused such a catastrophe.

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - MorrisC

Exactly the same thing has occurred in my Tiguan. 4 years old 37k miles full service history, fuel filter changed and 3 months later belt shreds and knocks the timing out - new top end to engine and new diesel pump - expensive. AA on arrival diagnosed straight away - obviously seen it before. non franchise service and repair (same place). Hopefully more people will also advise and maybe VW will hold their hand up. Still waiting for the adjustments for emmissions - VW not top of the favourites list.

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - Sunman

Well I asked about these multipoint inspections, and was told it's impossible to be 100% sure with belts, unless a fault is glaringly obvious. The green tick really means nothing more than someone having had a quick look/ feel, and making sure tension seems ok. Car was serviced in July, and then new brake discs/pads in October, with multipoint checks performed both times. I think you are right, this is likely a failure of a service item not due for replacement, and that's really why the dealer have decided to subsidise the cost. But disgusted that VW are washing their hands of it, and seem really unconcerned since they "have not come across it before."

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - Dorset123

Why do you think you are hard done by ? Your vehicle is out of warranty and the dealer has offered to pay 50% I would have thought that was a result.

Everybody today thinks that someone is too blame for things happening when it is just one of those things I am sorry you have to pay all that money but put it down to experience and move on.

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - gordonbennet

Firstly i wouldn't expect this maker to contribute a single pfennig.

I'm a little puzzled by the eagerness of the dealer to go halves, the car is out of warranty (end of) and the maker is, as usual, disinterested, why is the dealer voluntarily throwing over £3k at you, unless they know something.

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - Cyd

I don't have intimate knowledge of this model, but I simply don't buy into the stone idea. Just about all cars these days have way too much "stuff" in the way for a stone to get anywhere near.

The diesel contamination theory sounds plausible. Unfortunately the evidence for such is in the skip now!!

In what way was the damage irepairable? And how did the belt trauma damage the turbo?

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - gordonbennet
In what way was the damage irepairable? And how did the belt trauma damage the turbo?

1 complete lump out 1 complete lump in, old lump sent instantly on exchange basis, nothing to see here move along now....no difficult questions, we're the main dealer doncha know.

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - Cyd

indeed GB!

For 7 grand odd I would hope it was a brand new motor, not reconditioned!!

Main dealer offering half for a repair of this nature.....without being pressed.....hhhmmmm!!......did Hell freeze over recently???

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - Sunman

indeed GB!

For 7 grand odd I would hope it was a brand new motor, not reconditioned!!

Main dealer offering half for a repair of this nature.....without being pressed.....hhhmmmm!!......did Hell freeze over recently???

Yes - it was a brand new engine.

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - Sunman
In what way was the damage irepairable? And how did the belt trauma damage the turbo?

Here's the main part of the engineer's report

On inspection found that the ‘v belt’ was shredded. When this let go it also hit the cambelt as there is also damage to this.

There is a possibility that the force of this could have put the engine timing out. We would advise a new v belt and cambelt so that we are able to start the vehicle. There is a possibility that there may be internal damage to the engine.

Replaced v belt, on removal found that there was a very small stone caught in the pulley, suspect this may be the cause of the v belt shredding.

Replaced cambelt. Car will not fire still.

Carried out guided fault finding, fault logged with turbo charger. Carried out compression checks to all 4 cylinders, found that all the cylinders compressions were very low. 3 of them were at 11 bar and the 4 th was at 9 bar. At a minimum the compressions should be at 19 bar for each cylinder.

This signifies that there is internal damage to the engine and we would advise a complete new engine. With regards to the turbo charger fault, this could be caused by the fact that the engine compressions are low, however the turbo charger will have to be removed from the car to change over to the new engine, so it will be more cost efficient for the customer to replace it at the same time as the engine change. We will not know if there is a fault with the original turbo charger until the new engine is fitted. If the turbo charger is still at fault, there would be an additional £1500.00 cost to replace it.

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - Andrew-T

Is £7200 a 'reasonable' charge for a replacement engine & turbo? If it charged in to the dealer at half that, OP has nicely balanced their books for them ....

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - The-Mechanic

I'd be inclined to ask that the cylinder head be removed first and the pistons / bores inspected for damage. The valves will obviously be bent hence the low compression readings but there may not be damage to the pistons or bores and it may be a cheaper option to have just the head replaced ?

The dealership doesn't mention what the error code for the turbo is which is a shame. I'd ask for the diagnostic error code and definition before committing to a new unit. These turbos have a common problem with the VNT actuator diaphragm splitting so it cannot adjust the vanes in the turbo giving an under boost condition which will be logged by the ECU as P0299 Turbocharger/Supercharger "A" Underboost Condition. If this is the case there is an actuator available to replace the faulty one without having to change the whole turbo.

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - cws

I think by 2010, VW had switched over to electronic turbo actuators, so can't be a split diaphragm. However, I'm still puzzled as to why the car needed a new turbo as well.

I hate to say it, but one of the comments above where someone says the dealer may have 'balanced their books' may be true.......

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - The-Mechanic

cws,

The actuators are still vacuum operated. There is an electronic position sensor on the top of the unit that is used for the feedback values to the ECU so it knows where the actuator is and it can adjust the vacuum accordingly in relation to engine speed, load, temperature etc for the best boost characteristics at the time.

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - Simon

The stone theory sounds dubious to me but who knows? 55,000 miles and a knackered engine however it has occurred, is not good.

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - thunderbird

Stones can get caught in pulleys and damage belts, seen it, happened to a colleague. There was a hole in the belt just like a hole punch had been used on it. The belt was intact otherwise and it was only spotted at the next service.

But since the cam belt is totally seperate and hidden behind a plastic (or sometimes metal) cover together with all its tensioners etc its highly unlikely or to be honest impossible on all the installations I have seen for the 2 belts to come into contact.

Not familiar with modern VW engines thus cannot coment if it could happen on one of these.

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - Chris M

The car is coming up to 4 years old and could be deemed to be 1/3 rd of the way through its' life. On that basis a 2/3 rds contribution may be considered the most you should expect. But the car's value should have risen due to the new engine, perhaps not all the way up to a low mileage example as everything else has 55k of wear, but that brings it closer to the 50% given.

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - Sunman

The car is coming up to 4 years old and could be deemed to be 1/3 rd of the way through its' life. On that basis a 2/3 rds contribution may be considered the most you should expect. But the car's value should have risen due to the new engine, perhaps not all the way up to a low mileage example as everything else has 55k of wear, but that brings it closer to the 50% given.

Nice logic Chris, makes me feel slightly better....I had hoped for 75% contribution, but whilst the dealer seemed keen to help, VW have been totally unforthcoming (and seemingly unconcerned). Dealer has now also offered 10% off future servicing for the life of the car. We have a second VW (Eos) and the 10% offer has been applied to that too.

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - peter moss

Rightly or wrongly i understood that VW deemed 7 years old as end of life that was after another VW problem they had a few years ago !

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - davebee
hi I run a very small garage and have first hand knowledge of this problem we fitted a fuel filter it leaked onto the belt. Belt shredded wrapped itself round crankshaft/camshaft belt. The belt jumped put the timing out piston and valve contact each other result one dead engine. What we found was the camshafts on this engine are hollow the camlobes are pressed on to the camshafts normally they are a solid lump of metal which is then machined to give the desired profiles So when the piston on this engine hit the valves the valves transferred the resultant forces via the rocker arms to the cam lobes and they simply got knocked out of position .However the fix is not so simple as you have to fit 2 new camshafts A tool was purchased £700.00 to set camshafts in correct position still cant make up if this is heath robinson or state of the art engineering.No other damage was found. Job done car fine I took full responsibility for this job even paid for car rental total cost in excess of £2200 OUCH!. i have read somewhere there is a recall on the filter housing but not sure if this applies.. hope this little tale of woe helps someone out their Dave
VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - peter moss

Thank goodness for a good old boy with working knoweldge of todays so called advances in mechaical design , who in their right mind would design a camshaft with interference fit lobes its an accident waiting to happen ,dodgy fuel filter designs no wonder they offered what they thought they could get away with !

VW Tiguan 2.0TDI - Expensive engine failure! - corax

Thank goodness for a good old boy with working knoweldge of todays so called advances in mechaical design , who in their right mind would design a camshaft with interference fit lobes

The same manufacturer that put an interference fit oil pump drive shaft on their PD diesels, and look what happened to them.

I seriously wonder about some of the decisions made by bigwigs at VW these days.

The 'stone caught in the belt' sounds dubious to me. Surely if the belt was shredded, this stone, if it was even there, would have disappeared long ago, or did it somehow glue itself to the belt?

The fuel filter seal sounds more plausible, and if so, then it points to a recall, and the problem lies with VW.

Was the engineer independent? When I was in the process of buying my current car, it had good history, rare colour and 1 owner but the front brake discs were shot due to the car standing for a long time. The dealer claimed they were OK, but I wanted him to change them. In the end he took the car to his 'MOT place' around the corner who also claimed they were serviceable. The pedal was vibrating when I applied the brakes and they were pitted from surface corrosion, they were totally shot. After some pursuation he agreed a sum for new pads and discs, but I bought them and had them done elsewhere as I didn't trust him.

People in the trade will look after one another even if the customer is right.

Edit - I should say some people!

Edited by corax on 22/01/2017 at 11:06

 

Ask Honest John

Value my car