Petrol particulate filters - primus 1
Just reading the reviews for the updated Fabia, I see the petrol models are now equipped with a petrol particulate filter, as I think all new petrol cars will have to be, if not now then in the future, does this mean that they will suffer the same problems as the diesel equivalents especially if , like me, you just do low mileage’s,
Petrol particulate filters - Miniman777

Too early to say. Maunfacturers should be aware thorugh extensive testing, but does that stop them sticking cars on the market knowing that once the warranty has expired it's not their problem? VW group has a history of cars which developed serious defects (DSG gearboxes, Teves ABS modules, TFSI engine issues, ERG valves etc ) and left the owner on his/her own to pick up hefty tabs more often than not.

It doesn't bode well and I'd not be couraged to buy one.

Petrol particulate filters - madf

Early in my life I decided that adopting new technology early was for those with money to burn and people who liked to be guinea pigs and pay for the priviedge. (Rather than be paid)

It's a policy which has saved me loadsofmoney and loadsof hassle. Who cares if your phone is 5 years old, or your camera was designed in 2009 or your car was first sold in 2012? By waiting a few years, prices on new tech fall - often a LOT- bugs are ironed out and consumer reports warn you of issues.

A no brainer..

Edited by madf on 27/08/2018 at 14:13

Petrol particulate filters - edlithgow

Who cares if your phone is 5 years old, or your camera was designed in 2009 or your car was first sold in 2012?

I'd care.

I'd hate to have a car as recent as that.

Petrol particulate filters - Engineer Andy

Even though many manufacturers have had issues on their diesel models, some appear to have learnt from theirs and others' mistakes, but I suspect some won't have - you only have to look at the problems with some Land Rover cars to see how (IMHO) inept they are at design by design flaws such as the poor positioning of the DPF that cannot passively regenerate because it can't get hot enough (as well as many other faults), and I wouldn't be surprised if similar faults start appearing on petrol engined cars of makes with a reputation for problems generally.

I'm with other Backroomers in saying I'd be wary of going for a brand new engine or major system design as its released unless the brands you're looking at have never had much in the way of major reliability issues in the past.

If PPF problems start popping up over the next few years in more than a few makes of car, especially major selling brands, then there's going to be quite a reckoning in my view. Ones with less or no (design) issues on this score up until now who are more likely to avoid future ones will be the big winners.

If I'm forced into getting a car with some kind of particulate filtration system, I'll be doing a good deal of research first to see which system is likely to be the most fault free for my driving pattern. For people who do lots of short urban trips from cold, this may well reduce the list of worthwhile cars considerably, possibly even forcing them into the hybrid, plug-in hybrid and full EV range of cars, despite the extra cost and charging drawbacks of the latter two.

Petrol particulate filters - RobJP

I don't see it as much of a problem as others do.

1. Petrol engines produce a lot fewer particulates than diesels - even the modern direct injection petrol cars (which are supposedly the worst for this) produce a tiny fraction of the particulates to be 'trapped' by the filter, compared to diesels.

2. Petrol engines warm up a lot quicker than diesels. My (2.0) 325d takes at least 6 miles for the temp guage to even start to move, whereas the 2.0 petrol Z4 is fully up to temperature within that distance, and the guage starts moving within 2 miles.

3. Petrol engines, as we know, generally produce less torque than diesels. So the engine has to be worked harder through the rev range, whereas you can be lazy with a diesel, and let the torque at low revs do a lot of the work. So the petrol engine (and thus it's exhaust system) gets up to temperature more quickly, aiding in passive regen of the far fewer particulates.

Who knows, I may be completely wrong though !

Petrol particulate filters - focussed

Petrol engines produce a lot fewer particulates than diesels

Sorry to burst your bubble RobJP - but the euro standard for particulate emissions for passenger cars - petrols and diesels for a euro 6 September 2018 is exactly the same!

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_emission_standards

Petrol particulate filters - bolt

I don't see it as much of a problem as others do.

Maybe not, but I think it will depend on design, like how far away the PPF is away from the manifold, it relies on hot oxygen to burn the particles, and gather certain Fords have problems with it filling up already with the ECU warning of it but not doing anything about it

apparently the PPF only holds about 1gram whereas the DPF is approx. 30grams, info available on google but the problem is the ECU should tell the engine to run lean during burn off but doesn't always which causes the blocking

I found no info on the Ford ie if they are going to sort it or not ?

Petrol particulate filters - TheGentlemanThug

I'm no engineer, not by a long shot, but it seems that the filter doesn't trap soot in the way that a DPF does, so that may reduce the risk of the filter clogging up.

Petrol particulate filters - BMW Enthusiast

It's just another money racket to oppress the motorist.

Petrol particulate filters - skidpan

A PPF is very different to a DPF in many respects. Diesel particulates are very different to petrol particulates and the way a petrol engine operates is very different to a diesel.

This means that (as I understand it) the PPF burns off particulate matter constantly since the petrol exhaust runs much hotter than a diesel exhaust which means no diesel type regens.

And since they operate under different conditions a replacement PPF is far cheaper than a DPF when eventually (as with all exhaust components) a replacement is required. I have seen estimates between £25 and £150 which is nothing to get too worried about.

But having said all that we made sure that we got the new Fabia TSi before VAG fitted PPF's (or GPF's in some languages), its one less thing to worry about.

Petrol particulate filters - alan1302

It's just another money racket to oppress the motorist.

No, it's to stop particulate to get into the envronment and into your lungs...

Did yu have the same views about teh introduction of ctalysts on petrol cars?

Petrol particulate filters - BMW Enthusiast

No, it's to stop particulate to get into the envronment and into your lungs...

Did yu have the same views about teh introduction of ctalysts on petrol cars?

You're a right little eco warrior aren't you?

Petrol particulate filters - landmarker

He's not wrong though, is he...

If it extends the time we can buy petrol engines, creating more variety and competition in the market (vs monopoly of EVs), and benefits health - particularly of people living in cities, is it necessarily a bad thing?

It seems to me the problems with DPFs are to do with poor engineering choices, poor testing and consumer regulations which don't look after the customer. The DPF as a concept is not inherently bad.

Edited by landmarker on 28/08/2018 at 16:13

Petrol particulate filters - FP

"You're a right little eco warrior aren't you?"

Childish comment. This, together with "It's just another money racket to oppress the motorist" suggests you have a rather large chip on your shoulder.

If you value the environment in general, and people's health in particular, you would see why pollution has to be controlled. Or perhaps you don't.

Petrol particulate filters - BMW Enthusiast

"You're a right little eco warrior aren't you?"

Childish comment. This, together with "It's just another money racket to oppress the motorist" suggests you have a rather large chip on your shoulder.

If you value the environment in general, and people's health in particular, you would see why pollution has to be controlled. Or perhaps you don't.

You really believe that burning fossil fuels is linked with climate change? Fair enough! I certainly don't. No genuine "petrol head" or vehicle enthusiast as I prefer to say falls for that claptrap.

Petrol particulate filters - RobJP

"You're a right little eco warrior aren't you?"

Childish comment. This, together with "It's just another money racket to oppress the motorist" suggests you have a rather large chip on your shoulder.

If you value the environment in general, and people's health in particular, you would see why pollution has to be controlled. Or perhaps you don't.

You really believe that burning fossil fuels is linked with climate change? Fair enough! I certainly don't. No genuine "petrol head" or vehicle enthusiast as I prefer to say falls for that claptrap.

'Belief' has nothing to do with it. It has been proved, scientifically, that levels of CO2 in the atmosphere have risen at an alarming rate over the last 200 years, and even more so in the last 2-3 decades. During that timescale, the general trend has been towards a warming, and this can be seen in a large number of countries and continents.

'Belief' is for gods. Science is what keeps aircraft up.

As for your comments about someone being a little eco-warrior, if all you've got to offer are insults then you've already lost the argument, and we all know it.

Petrol particulate filters - BMW Enthusiast

'Belief' has nothing to do with it. It has been proved, scientifically, that levels of CO2 in the atmosphere have risen at an alarming rate over the last 200 years, and even more so in the last 2-3 decades. During that timescale, the general trend has been towards a warming, and this can be seen in a large number of countries and continents.

'Belief' is for gods. Science is what keeps aircraft up.

As for your comments about someone being a little eco-warrior, if all you've got to offer are insults then you've already lost the argument, and we all know it.

We shall see in the very near future who has lost the argument when Petrol Particulate Filters start to cause the same problems as Diesel Particulate Filters do on short drives. One more thing. Have you ever noticed how black the tip of the exhaust pipe on a new petrol engine car gets compared with a new diesel engine car?

Petrol particulate filters - RobJP

We shall see in the very near future who has lost the argument when Petrol Particulate Filters start to cause the same problems as Diesel Particulate Filters do on short drives. One more thing. Have you ever noticed how black the tip of the exhaust pipe on a new petrol engine car gets compared with a new diesel engine car?

More pure speculation.

You have absolutely no evidence that PPFs will suffer the same problems as DPFs do. If you'd read, considered and actively sought to contribute something to the discussion, you might have some valuable input. For example, petrol engines run a lot hotter, thus the exhaust systems run a lot hotter, thus passive regens will happen a lot more easily, causing fewer problems. In addition, petrol engines produce a tiny fraction of the particulates of diesels, so the filter will take a lot longer to clog up.

Alas, such consideration and positive input seems beyond you. You prefer to throw out wild accusations, conspiracy theories, and insults, in a Trump-esque style.

As to your claim that the exhaust pipes on 'new' petrol cars getting considerably dirtier than those on diesel cars, there can be a whole host of reasons as to why that is. Vehicle aerodynamics, frequency of washing, even the engine potentially burning oil if cylinder bore liners are worn, etc. Without some actual reasoning, there is zero validity in such a statement.

Petrol particulate filters - FP

"You really believe that burning fossil fuels is linked with climate change? Fair enough! I certainly don't. No genuine "petrol head" or vehicle enthusiast as I prefer to say falls for that claptrap."

Oh dear. Shall we keep to the point?

Who mentioned climate change?

You prefer petrol to have lead in it? You prefer people to suffer lung disease? Asthma attacks? You like the murky haze that hangs over traffic-polluted cities?

And, since you mention climate change, why is it that a genuine "vehicle enthusiast" wouldn't believe in the effects of burning fossil fuel on climate change?

You seem to like throwing around trivial comments that are pretty badly thought through.

Edited by FP on 28/08/2018 at 18:54

Petrol particulate filters - BMW Enthusiast

Oh dear. Shall we keep to the point?

Who mentioned climate change?

You seem to like throwing around trivial comments that are pretty badly thought through.

Do not try and get smart with me with your sanctimonious attitude.

Petrol particulate filters - RobJP

Do not try and get smart with me with your sanctimonious attitude.

'Try and get smart'.

The best advice you could get, given by you freely.

Remember, Irony isn't a metal.

Oh, and if you're accusing others of having 'attitude', then maybe you'd like to apologise for your insults to other posters, not to mention your comically 'threatening' comment above.

I'd love to know what you are going to do if FP continues with his 'attitude'.

Petrol particulate filters - FP

"I'd love to know what you are going to do if FP continues with his 'attitude'."

Ridiculous, isn't it? The guy can't have a reasoned debate and has to get a bit nasty when challenged.

It would be amusing were it not for the unpleasantness. In fact, ever since AS started posting on here, I thought he was someone with attitude.

Interesting that he thinks I'm sanctimonious. I wonder if he knows what that means.

Petrol particulate filters - dan86

"I'd love to know what you are going to do if FP continues with his 'attitude'."

Ridiculous, isn't it? The guy can't have a reasoned debate and has to get a bit nasty when challenged.

It would be amusing were it not for the unpleasantness. In fact, ever since AS started posting on here, I thought he was someone with attitude.

Interesting that he thinks I'm sanctimonious. I wonder if he knows what that means

Reminds me of a poster who used to frequent thus forum calos25. He was always right you was always wrong. And could only answer with insults but when challenged didn't like it.

Petrol particulate filters - FP

You'll always get people like this appearing on a public forum. It's a sad fact that the anonymity of the internet allows people to be more unreasonable than they are in real life. Or maybe they are always like that.

But often people put stuff that they haven't thought through and when asked to think about it and defend it, or explain it, or consider an alternative view, take it as a personal attack.

Petrol particulate filters - alan1302

Oh dear. Shall we keep to the point?

Who mentioned climate change?

You seem to like throwing around trivial comments that are pretty badly thought through.

Do not try and get smart with me with your sanctimonious attitude.

Just realsied the schools go back soon...

Petrol particulate filters - alan1302

in particular, you would see why pollution has to be controlled. Or perhaps you don't.

You really believe that burning fossil fuels is linked with climate change? Fair enough! I certainly don't. No genuine "petrol head" or vehicle enthusiast as I prefer to say falls for that claptrap.

No genuine petrol head thinks science is real? I know for sure that's not true.

You may believe that climate change is not partly mamade but does not make it true as there is lots of science to show it to be the case.

Petrol particulate filters - Big John

To achieve the latest Euro AG / 6dTEMP some petrol cars will be fitted with a particulate filter (usually called GPF or OPF or PPF) - these tend to be direct injection fuelled cars. Some port injection petrol cars don't require a particulate filter (er yet!). EG Skoda tsi direct injection engines will be fitted with an OPF but it looks like the port injection NA engine fitted to the Citigo will not be fitted with one yet.

Not 100% certain though as information is somewhat sketchy...

I think the Petrol PF will be less of a problem anyway as particulate emissions pre filters is much lower on petrol engines, in addition combustion temperatures are much higher which helps passive regen(most of the time when warmed up), I don't think active regens can be done in the same way as diesels as injecting extra fuel down the exhaust of a petrol would be rather explosive!

One long term thing that would worry me - as a petrol car gets older and starts burning oil then the smaller petrol particulate filters may quickly fail.

Edited by Big John on 27/08/2018 at 19:36

Petrol particulate filters - mss1tw

One long term thing that would worry me - as a petrol car gets older and starts burning oil then the smaller petrol particulate filters may quickly fail.

PPF and ultra long service intervals will be an interesting combo then

Petrol particulate filters - skidpan

You really believe that burning fossil fuels is linked with climate change? Fair enough! I certainly don't. No genuine "petrol head" or vehicle enthusiast as I prefer to say falls for that claptrap.

Regardless of the climate change discussion causing unnecessary polution is totally irresponsible.

Go back to 1996 and our first diesel, a Golf TDi 90 PS. A great car we had for 7 years but it was a dirty beast, press on the loud pedal and the world behind the car would dissapear in a black cloud. The last diesel we bought was a Kia Ceed CRDi 115 PS with a DPF and in the 5 years we owned it we never saw any smoke at all. That is progress, anyone with only 1/2 a brain knows that damaging the envirnment and peoples health is irresponsible and it shows just how much the improvent up to and including Euro 5 helped clean up exhausts.

And lets be honest I am a petrol head. 2 Caterhams, had this one 26 years almost but this car is far cleaner than it was when new. Originally it was a 1700 X-Flow on twin Webers, did 25 mpg on a good day and had to run richer than desirable due to the tune of the engine etc. Now its a modern 2 litre Zetec on TB injection. Way more powerful than the X-Flow was but the engine runs clean and on a good day averages 35 mpg, a 40% increase on the X-Flow.

And another example. My 1989 Mk2 Golf GTi had 112 bhp and averaged about 32 mpg. No CAT and god knows what carp came out of the tail pipe. My 2013 Leon 1.4 TSi 140 PS averaged about 45 mpg and met Euro 5 regs. It was way quicker than the Golf especially in respect of in gear acceleration.

Being environmentally friendly does not mean you cannot be a petrol head. But round these parts there are many you chaps who have had their diesels chippd to within a mm of their life and appear to revell in the clouds of black smoke their cars produce. Those cars should be taken off the road and crushed and their drivers fined and banned. They know what they are doing so no excuse.

Petrol particulate filters - Big John

You really believe that burning fossil fuels is linked with climate change? Fair enough! I certainly don't. No genuine "petrol head" or vehicle enthusiast as I prefer to say falls for that claptrap.

Regardless of the climate change discussion causing unnecessary polution is totally irresponsible.

Go back to 1996 and our first diesel, a Golf TDi 90 PS. A great car we had for 7 years but it was a dirty beast, press on the loud pedal and the world behind the car would dissapear in a black cloud. The last diesel we bought was a Kia Ceed CRDi 115 PS with a DPF and in the 5 years we owned it we never saw any smoke at all. That is progress, anyone with only 1/2 a brain knows that damaging the envirnment and peoples health is irresponsible and it shows just how much the improvent up to and including Euro 5 helped clean up exhausts.

And lets be honest I am a petrol head. 2 Caterhams, had this one 26 years almost but this car is far cleaner than it was when new. Originally it was a 1700 X-Flow on twin Webers, did 25 mpg on a good day and had to run richer than desirable due to the tune of the engine etc. Now its a modern 2 litre Zetec on TB injection. Way more powerful than the X-Flow was but the engine runs clean and on a good day averages 35 mpg, a 40% increase on the X-Flow.

And another example. My 1989 Mk2 Golf GTi had 112 bhp and averaged about 32 mpg. No CAT and god knows what carp came out of the tail pipe. My 2013 Leon 1.4 TSi 140 PS averaged about 45 mpg and met Euro 5 regs. It was way quicker than the Golf especially in respect of in gear acceleration.

Being environmentally friendly does not mean you cannot be a petrol head. But round these parts there are many you chaps who have had their diesels chippd to within a mm of their life and appear to revell in the clouds of black smoke their cars produce. Those cars should be taken off the road and crushed and their drivers fined and banned. They know what they are doing so no excuse.

100% agree - my first diesel was a 1990 1.6TD Passat where if you floored it all the cars behind you vanished in a cloud of smoke although it always passed it's MOT where the limit was 3.0m-1 (which is still the limit for older diesels where a plated value doesn't exist). Fortunately most cars which were that bad are no longer on the road.

The new MOT may sort out diesels badly chipped as with or without a DPF you now have to be within the plated value of the car (eg the new owner of my old Superb has mentioned the plated value is 0.7m-1 - wheras last years test was 3.0m-1). Obviously with a DPF car that plated value will be very low indeed and any sign of visible smoke is a fail.

I still see loads of diesel cars (and Vans!) less that 10 years old generating smoke, presumably they must have had there DPF's "deleted" - most were fitted with these before 2008 - except the odd Kia (although the plated value will still be low for Euro 4). Hopefully all of these will start to vanish over the next year. It must have been OK a few years ago but I hate being stuck behind a car laying smoke these days.

The problem is that comparing a modern DPF diesel to an unfiltered petrol DIRECT injection (not port injection) the petrol now creates more particulates at the tailpipe hence the need for the particulate filter for the direct injection petrol.

Edited by Big John on 31/08/2018 at 10:26

Petrol particulate filters - Galad

I changed my Golf TDI in June this year for a brand new Hyundai i30 T1.4 GDI petrol as my daily commute had drastically reduced to just 3 miles each way with a longer run at weekends of up to 20 miles. Have been using regular fuel (not supermarket) and there’s now just 3k on the clock. On my way home today a warning light popped up which I quickly deduced to be exhaust emissions. Whipped out the handbook and eventually came across advice on regeneration of the PPF tucked away at the back to drive the car in 3rd gear and 50mph for at least 30 minutes. Promptly did a motorway run and light finally went out after 30 minutes.

Wasn’t expecting this issue at all on a modern petrol car. I’m sure that lots of owners wouldn’t be able to find the advice that’s in the handbook (it’s nearly 500 pages! with no quick reference guide for essential items but lots of tips on not to drink and drive and ensure that passengers wear their seatbelts!!) and of course the dealer never mentioned it. Now going to switch to BP Ultimate petrol and give my car a weekly Italian tune-up on the motorway. Seems ironic though with all the fuel saving devices fitted to my car that I have to race it for 20 miles in 3rd gear just to keep the filter clean!

Petrol particulate filters - Leif
Apparently direct injection petrol engines can produce significant amounts of particulates and NOx. Does anyone know if a GPF can be fitted to a car built without one? I suspect not from what I have read. It looks as if by buying a new car in March, I missed the GPF by six months or so.
Petrol particulate filters - skidpan
Apparently direct injection petrol engines can produce significant amounts of particulates and NOx. Does anyone know if a GPF can be fitted to a car built without one? I suspect not from what I have read. It looks as if by buying a new car in March, I missed the GPF by six months or so.

Definitely not, the engines and the control systems will be very different. In the case of VAG they have replaced the 1.4 TSi with the 1.5 TSI since the old engine would not comply.

We bought our Fabia in March to specifically avoid the PPF, not because we want to polute but because I expected delivery delays (very true it turns out) and a price rise (true as well). We paid £12000 for the Fabia after discount and contributions from Carfile, the exact same car is now £14350, the only difference is the PPF.

Just enjoy your car.

For the record Skoda are referring to the PPF as the OPF (Otto Particulate Filter). No idea if the other VAG companies are doing the same.

Petrol particulate filters - Darryl586
Apparently direct injection petrol engines can produce significant amounts of particulates and NOx. Does anyone know if a GPF can be fitted to a car built without one? I suspect not from what I have read. It looks as if by buying a new car in March, I missed the GPF by six months or so.

Definitely not, the engines and the control systems will be very different. In the case of VAG they have replaced the 1.4 TSi with the 1.5 TSI since the old engine would not comply.

We bought our Fabia in March to specifically avoid the PPF, not because we want to polute but because I expected delivery delays (very true it turns out) and a price rise (true as well). We paid £12000 for the Fabia after discount and contributions from Carfile, the exact same car is now £14350, the only difference is the PPF.

Just enjoy your car.

For the record Skoda are referring to the PPF as the OPF (Otto Particulate Filter). No idea if the other VAG companies are doing the same.

(Suspicious link deleted, which wasn't in Skidpan's post that's being quoted.)

Any new update ????

Edited by Avant on 04/03/2019 at 17:41

Petrol particulate filters - skidpan
Apparently direct injection petrol engines can produce significant amounts of particulates and NOx. Does anyone know if a GPF can be fitted to a car built without one? I suspect not from what I have read. It looks as if by buying a new car in March, I missed the GPF by six months or so.

Definitely not, the engines and the control systems will be very different. In the case of VAG they have replaced the 1.4 TSi with the 1.5 TSI since the old engine would not comply.

We bought our Fabia in March to specifically avoid the PPF, not because we want to polute but because I expected delivery delays (very true it turns out) and a price rise (true as well). We paid £12000 for the Fabia after discount and contributions from Carfile, the exact same car is now £14350, the only difference is the PPF.

Just enjoy your car.

For the record Skoda are referring to the PPF as the OPF (Otto Particulate Filter). No idea if the other VAG companies are doing the same.

Any new update ????

Update about what?

Edited by Avant on 04/03/2019 at 17:40

Petrol particulate filters - KylePhan

Bought a 2011 GMC 2500 HD 6.6L Duramax Diesel Truck (first time EVER owning a diesel)from a used car dealer June of 2015 truck ran great up until 3 weeks ago, when it said DEF low and was only able to go max 20 miles an hour, did searching on what DEF meant and where the tank is “suppose” to be, can see the plug for the DEF tank but the person who owned before me had it removed, Not sure if it is legal to drive without it, but he has been in the repair shop for 3 weeks now(diesel truck repair place) and they are having a hard time to get the code to over ride the problem, the Allison transmission keeps throwing the code. At a lose on what to do now, they said it could cost thousands of dollars to put a tank back on, and yes it also has the delete kit on it. live in Alabama and not sure if this is legal and what to do in order to get the truck repaired.

(LInk deleted)

Edited by Avant on 28/06/2019 at 10:30

Petrol particulate filters - dan86

You'd be better looking at a forum specific to these vehicles or one for American vehicles.

Petrol particulate filters - sammy1

brand new Hyundai i30 T1.4 GDI petrol

Whipped out the handbook and eventually came across advice on regeneration of the PPF tucked away at the back to drive the car in 3rd gear and 50mph for at least 30 minutes. Promptly did a motorway run and light finally went out after 30 minutes.

Does this sound familiar re the diesel DPF HJ was always advising wasting your time and fuel gunning the life out of your diesel to clear the DPF and now a major manufacturer has buried the info in their handbook for their petrol cars!

BMW enthusiast does have a point about modern diesel exhausts. I have long noticed how clean they can appear as apposed to petrol. In fact some BMW 320d tail pipes just seem to show pure metal and no trace at all of soot so they must be running pretty clean

Petrol particulate filters - Engineer Andy

brand new Hyundai i30 T1.4 GDI petrol

Whipped out the handbook and eventually came across advice on regeneration of the PPF tucked away at the back to drive the car in 3rd gear and 50mph for at least 30 minutes. Promptly did a motorway run and light finally went out after 30 minutes.

Does this sound familiar re the diesel DPF HJ was always advising wasting your time and fuel gunning the life out of your diesel to clear the DPF and now a major manufacturer has buried the info in their handbook for their petrol cars!

BMW enthusiast does have a point about modern diesel exhausts. I have long noticed how clean they can appear as apposed to petrol. In fact some BMW 320d tail pipes just seem to show pure metal and no trace at all of soot so they must be running pretty clean

Maybe they are just booting it all the time? After all, it IS a BMW. If you want to drive slowly, you don't buy one of them, do you?

Seriously though - my Mazda3 nearly 14yo 1.6 petrol has a clean tail pipe - that's more a sign that the car mainly does longer journeys that the engine is fully warmed up. It could be that, other thanm bootin it, those you've seen are owned by people who bought a diesel for the right reasons and used it appropriately, nothing more.

Petrol particulate filters - oldroverboy.

Sadly, for the many who cannot afford the latest "tech" they are buying cars that currently conform, only to get hit with the massive repair bills that come attached to a 3-4-5 year old car.

Petrol particulate filters - bolt

Maybe they are just booting it all the time? After all, it IS a BMW. If you want to drive slowly, you don't buy one of them, do you?

Funny how a lot do not boot them, its rare I see a BM Merc or an Audi booting it around, and usually they are not even driving at the speed limit when they are able to.

I have even noticed most drivers with new cars really taking their time holding other drivers up as though they are out on a Sunday drive, and if that is the case that these drivers drive like that all the time then its no wonder they suffer PPF problems

Petrol particulate filters - Sparrow

Are we now saying the Euro6 latest diesels are cleaner than non-ppf petrols? Makes onw wonder what the real reason is that Bristol want to ban all deisels, even the latest clean ones.

Petrol particulate filters - bolt

Are we now saying the Euro6 latest diesels are cleaner than non-ppf petrols? Makes onw wonder what the real reason is that Bristol want to ban all deisels, even the latest clean ones.

If Bristol is anything like London its public pressure as much as anything that is pushing for all diesels to be banned, as the perception is all diesels are bad, whatever year its made, and TFL are trying to get all banned, Local schools want diesels kept away during school time and permanently if and where possible

Cant say I blame them when you see motors pouring black smoke on acceleration, specially vans (older vans) most lorries are cleaner than certain vans

Petrol particulate filters - Geoff Dude
First problem in Honest John forum as we speak now
www.honestjohn.co.uk/forum/post/133523/hyundai-i30...i
 

Ask Honest John

Value my car