Any - Diesel cars - sammy1

Why would anyone buy a new diesel or certainly not a secondhand DIesel. Having read the forum for some time now all I read is diesel problems and usually expensive ones at that. Ok I suppose while in warranty But HJ today on the Landrover Discovery 'do not switch off but drive another 5 or 10 miles to regenerate the DPF and this is a newish car. Sorry I am late home but I am just rejenerating and wasting my time and money trying to save the planet !

Any - Diesel cars - RobJP

If you bought a car unsuitable for your needs, then don't go blaming diesels, or the government, or going on about diesels being pointless. Accept that YOU made the choice and bought the car. Information about DPF regens has been out there for years.

If you couldn't be bothered doing some research before buying, then there's only one person to blame.

Any - Diesel cars - badbusdriver

There are still plenty of instances where diesel makes the most sense, most obviously big miles or someone who regularly tows (something heavy). The example you use is, as Rob points out, the classic example of a diesel being used in a role it isn't suited for, and so 'extra journeys' need to be made for the sake of the DPF. This is not a problem for the traveling rep doing 50k miles per annum pounding up and down the motorways.

It is very likely that only a small proportion of those who drive diesel actually need diesel. This is partly down to the government pushing everybody towards diesel back in the late 90's, but also because of the meteoric rise in popularity of the SUV, most of which, apart from some smaller ones, are diesel.

Any - Diesel cars - Theophilus

"Why would anyone buy a new diesel or certainly not a secondhand DIesel."

Over the past 2 decades I've had 4 diesels - 2 purchased n"w and 2 S/H, each kept for 5 - 6 years. They've all been serviced annually and run on standard-grade fuel ... and I've never experienced a significant problem.

Why have I bought diesels - because 80% of my mileage is in France, where diesel is considerably less expensive than petrol, and as I've covered long distances rather than stop-start city motoring (at least since I retired as a GP!)

I've never been aware of my DPF regenerating - I would hesitate to block a diesel pump at a filling station sitting with engine idling for several minutes whilst regeneration completed, but to my knowledge it hasn't happened.

Edited by Theophilus on 13/12/2017 at 18:21

Any - Diesel cars - focussed

Why would anyone buy a new diesel?

Because I like the torque and driveablity of a good big diesel and it's my choice - you pays your money and you takes your pick!

Any - Diesel cars - SLO76
If your usage suits a DPF equipped diesel then there’s no reason why they can’t be perfectly reliable. You’ll often hear me warning others off diesels when shopping on a tight budget or buying with low mileage use in mind but I personally prefer the low speed pull and economy of a diesel and currently run two myself, a Honda CRV 1.6 and a VW Polo 1.2 TDi with 37k and 66k under their respective belts. Both are main dealer maintained and neither engine has given a moments bother.

The CRV will however be replaced by a petrol model next year as my new job (I’ve become a bad bus driver) involves a much shorter commute and it will no longer be wise to run a diesel. I’m thinking of returning to buying a cheapo used Jap instead of begging or borrowing.
Any - Diesel cars - sammy1

I do not own a diesel and my comments are only info picked up on the forum. I agree diesel for the consumer with the correct miles is probably fine. What prompted me to comment was the HJ comment about the latest INgenium diesel or any other and the need if neceesary to run the car 10 miles or more to help save the life of a vital expensive component.. Seems a big drawback to me and as for commercial vehicles idling for long periods seems a worry to me. I drive and I also walk the main roads and emmisions are a problem, more noticeable in the recent cold weather. I wonder if readers saw that lad being towed on his toboggan behind his dads truck, I bet his lungs had an abnormal dose of exhaust probable diesel. I find a lot of the replies on here are too quick to jump to conclusions however the tech part is very informative and overall agood read!

Any - Diesel cars - Andrew-T

I've had a small Peugeot diesel for about 25 years, first a 205 Dturbo, then a couple of 306s, and for the last 9 years a 207. All of them have been good cars provided they receive the basic minimum of maintenance, regular oil and filter changes (preferably more often than suggested) and occasional shots of injector cleaner. The 205 averaged 52mpg, the 306s about 55, and the 207 has bettered 60mpg all its life. It enjoys an occasional small dose of Shell V-plus Nitro which I find has an immediate smoothing (soothing?) effect on the engine.

One comment on diesels generally: it seems much rarer these days to see a diesel car throwing out a black smoke screen, so something has been done in that area. Is it only down to DPF's ? (my car is just too old to have one, but makes no smoke AFAIK).

Any - Diesel cars - FiestaOwner

Why would anyone buy a new diesel or certainly not a secondhand DIesel. Having read the forum for some time now all I read is diesel problems and usually expensive ones at that. Ok I suppose while in warranty But HJ today on the Landrover Discovery 'do not switch off but drive another 5 or 10 miles to regenerate the DPF and this is a newish car. Sorry I am late home but I am just rejenerating and wasting my time and money trying to save the planet !

Some manufactures seem to have implemented DPF regen system better than others. I drive a 2.2 Transit (15 plate 50,000 miles).

When doing town work, I can get around 4 failed regens on the trot. I'm never aware that it's trying to regen until I've stopped outside my clients house (at that point I have to turn the engine off to do my visit). It's not appropriate to go for a run for 1/2 hour, I've got a job to do (and my clients are expecting me on time).

My van does get a least 2 decent runs every day, but often seems to attempt to start a regen at the end of one of these runs. I do around 500 miles a week. Can't be sure, but I think it tries to regen about every 500 miles.

However, I keep a good check on the oil level & it never rises. Hence feel some manufacturers have a more successful implementation of this system.

Any - Diesel cars - gordonbennet

It's in the buyers hands, or rather the buyers pocket, that the cure for this failed regen lunacy lies, whilst people continue to buy vehicles unfit for purpose, then makers will continue to churn them out.

We had this with spare wheels, people actually believed when told they didn't need a spare wheel, so spare wheels started to disappear and still these cars were bought,

We have this with frankly ridiculously wide and large wheel rims, with stupidly thin sidewalled elastic bands stretched round them, plus complimentary concrete springs and rock hard dampers, yet people can't buy these boneshakers quickly enough especially if they look aggressive or have some R or S or M badge put in place apprenatly to impress others, no i don't get it either.

Also happy to buy into electric parking brakes and robotised manual gearboxes which are ticking time bombs of eye watering bills just waiting to go off in your face....though for those who change when warranty expires it matters little, but what never ceases to amaze me is how many want thse things as used buys out of warranty, you couldn't pay me enough.

Yet for all the money people are prepared to spend out on these vehicles, some barely fit for purpose on UK's ruined roads, they baulk at having their car sensibly serviced in order to keep it running well for as long as possible, and just as they've been told they need an EPB or DSG but don't need a spare wheel, they've swallowed hook line and sinker the daft service intervals these car sellers have come up with in order to make the car appear a better bet on the balance sheet.

You couldn't make it up, £25k car set to lose some 50% or more of its purchase price in the first 3 years, yet can't possibly conceive of spending £100 on an extra oil change every other year to keep the thing running hunky dory.

Anyway back to Diesels and regens, all this need not be as it now is, it only needs as found in Euro 6 lorries, where the condition of the DPF can be monitored simply so anyone with half a brain can understand state of play on the diagnostics menu, and if a regen is needed then the driver can if they so wish either manually start a regen when conditions are right or indeed cancel one that is just about to start automatically, how on earth can the car know when a regen is best achieved, the car doesn't know where or when the vehicle is travelling, the driver does, the present system is potty and the car buyer is the one paying for the bad joke.

Its utter lunacy buying a Diesel to save money then having to drive it nowhere to satisfy some bodged up half thought out an poorly implented device, that does its own thing anyway.

The buyer has such power in this world yet doesn't use it, these makers want your money and the state wants you to repay all your earnings in tax or buying goods so they get the tax from the suppliers, one way or another the state wants what little is left in your wallet, stop giving it to them until they make vehicles that are quality products and fit for purpose, and are not just bling trinkets.

Hopefully the nasty downturn we are going into will bring some sense back into the world of cars, the industry has got a bit above itself over the last decade and the public have paying through the nose to fund them.

Any - Diesel cars - movilogo

Most SUVs are diesel only (especially if buying auto) and people may want a car within warranty period (and thus avoiding used cars).

If people stop buying diesel cars then manufactuers have to offer alternate petrol models.

Any - Diesel cars - SteVee

When I was looking for a new car about 4 years ago, every single salesperson told me that their diesel was not suitable for my usage; probably because I made a point of telling them my expected mileage. Some (volvo especially) didn't really have an alternative, so they were waving goodbye to a possible sale.

If people can't be bothered to discuss this when looking then that's their lookout

Any - Diesel cars - corax

If people stop buying diesel cars then manufactuers have to offer alternate petrol models.

I'm still waiting to see how long the new generation small capacity turbo petrols will last before they start going wrong. It's feasible that some of them may be better than I think, but with the manufacturers putting cost cutting first these days I'm not that positive.

My mum still has a Morphy Richards food mixer bought in 1976. Admittedly it doesn't get a hard life now, but it was used a lot in it's early years, and still works. I can't imagine anything that you'd buy at an equivalent cost would last anything like as long these days.

Any - Diesel cars - Andrew-T

<< I'm still waiting to see how long the new generation small capacity turbo petrols will last before they start going wrong. >>

I love that quote. I imagine you, four years later, still waiting for something to make you say 'I knew they were unreliable ..' :-)

Any - Diesel cars - corax

<< I'm still waiting to see how long the new generation small capacity turbo petrols will last before they start going wrong. >>

I love that quote. I imagine you, four years later, still waiting for something to make you say 'I knew they were unreliable ..' :-)

I'll probably have bought one of the things by then Andrew-T :-)

Any - Diesel cars - Hojo_81

I'm a diesel owner, a late 09 plate Seat Ibiza 1.6tdi, I'll be honest this car/engine and the emissions fix has put me off diesels. This engine in particular is plagued with EGR and DPF issues and the emissions fix (only needed because VW were pulling a fast one) has made these issues and others worse. (rough idle, injectors, manifold valves etc)

What we need in the future is some kind of display when the car needs a Regen (not a warning light when it's blocked) or when it's in the process of doing it to prevent related issues from appearing. Most cars of the past 10 years give the driver no indication of this which is not good enough, nor is saying you bought the wrong type of car. The fact is annual mileage doesn't gove a true indication of whether a diesel is suitable, what's more important is the frequency of a long run so a full regen cycle can complete.

At the end of the day attempts to limit particulates/emissions have made diesels far more unrealiable as these systems are not fit for purpose over the lifetime of the car and expensive to sort out. You could argue that these DPF systems cause even more health problems as the soot and particles that are burnt off are much finer with a larger dispersal area.

If I was buying a diesel tomorrow it would be pre DPF era. Far more reliable, betterr real world mpg.

Any - Diesel cars - sandy56

I ran a Peugeot 2l HDI diesel auto for four years, on a moderate mileage, no more than 10k/annum, and never had a problem.

It is not just how many miles you drive, but how you drive it. I think part of the problem is the engines do not get warm enough. I think a warm engine, warm exhaust etc helps modern engines, and avoids expensive problems. Running at light throttle, low revs, all the time will not help.

I have just bought a 2nd hand large diesel auto, which I expect to keep about 2-4 years. I dont buy cars with a history of diesel and related problems eg VAG.

Any - Diesel cars - Hojo_81

I agree with that, they do need to be revved and driven, eco driving does them no favours. The problem with doing that with my 1.6tdi is that the mpg nose dives with heavy throttle use, my old 1.9 PD could be driven hard and still return 50mpg+.

I hear you on that, I will never buy another VAG diesel again, there old PD engines though were decent.

 

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