Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - Bycro
Hi all

My i40 diesel will soon be at the end of its four year lease, currently sitting with 112,000 relatively trouble free miles.

Not to sure if I want to go down the diesel route next time, and have been looking at the ioniq.

I drive a fair few miles, lots of motorway, and although HJ writes a comprehensive review of this car I would be interested to learn of any owners experiences too.

I will be arranging a test drive.

Thanks in advance.
Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - badbusdriver

No specific info re the ioniq, but hybrids in general are not really suited to long motorway journeys. Once the battery power has been used up, which is typically going to be 10-20 miles, you are just driving a not particularly efficient petrol car carrying a very heavy battery and electric motor.

I think that type of runing would be better suited to diesel. Just find out which make/model is least likely to give you issues.

Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - colinh

Currently running a Kia Niro hybrid, which is basically the same drive train as the Ioniq. The battery in hybrids is gaining energy in braking, over-run, down-grades, etc. - and provides a boost to output throughout a journey. The majority of my motoring is on Spanish motorways running on cruise control, and currently I'm averaging 56mpg (brim-to-brim records), which is better than previous diesel consumption for the same type of motoring. Finding the dual-clutch gearbox (pause for the usual anti-comments) is superior in consumption and drive terms than previous Toyota hybrids.

Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - Bycro
Thanks Colinh

Can I ask, do you find the Niro quiet , refined and smooth at motorway speed ?

Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - colinh

Yes - particularly compared to the Toyota CVT boxes. Ioniq/Niro definitely worth a test drive.

Steer clear of the trims with larger wheels - look a bit nicer, but they come with a penalty of higher consumption and emissions. The middle trim is usually the sweet spot

Edited by colinh on 10/12/2017 at 09:43

Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - Avant

Choose the right petrol engine, Bycro, and you could get what you need without resorting to dlesel or hybrid.

On a long run SWMBO's Audi A1 1.4 petrol will give 55 mpg, whereas my diesel Volvo V60 can occasionally manage 50 mpg, more usually 48. OK, the Volvo is bigger and it's an automatic, but it ought at least to level-peg with the Audi. And the 1.4 TSI is much livelier as well as queter than the diesel.

Depending on your lease budget and the size of car you want, one of the VW Group cars with this 1.4 TSI engine should suit you well. The Skoda Octavia (hatch or estate) is a similar size to your i40, but there are plenty of alternative models from VW, Audi and SEAT with this engine.

There are other efficient petrol engines which have come to the market in the past few years - the Peugeot 1.2 and Suzuki 1.4 for example, and the new 1.0 Honda Civic is well reviewed. But some 1.0 engines, notably the one in the Ford Fiesta and Focus, aren't so economical unless driven gently.

Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - Falkirk Bairn

i40 is a biggish car - do you need that size?

Avensis saloon/estate comes with 1.8 petrol or a BMW diesel engine.

Smaller is the Auris estate / hatchback is petrol, diesel or hybrid.

Hybrid Taxis seem to be common & the Toyotas can cover lunar mileges - 5 year warranty

When I ran a go to work car I bought new, last of the line, clearance model / big discount & kept it for 3/4 years.

A former friend's company (now defunct- for a very odd reason) had dozens of company cars - he bought new & leased over 3 years (90K) but that was expensive because of the mileage - he started buying ex day rent cars.

3- 6 mths old - 10K on clock (or less) sold them after 18 months /2 years with 60K on clock as warranty ran out - for him it was much cheaper. Maybe wrth a look. 60K car is worth something reasonable , 90K is high for a 3 year car.

Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - badbusdriver

The i40 is about the same size as the avensis. And while I don't have any 1st hand info on the BMW diesel used in the avensis, SLO says they are not very good.

Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - Bycro
Thanks Avant

You mention some good and valid points for me to consider.

Food for thought.
Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - Engineer Andy

Choose the right petrol engine, Bycro, and you could get what you need without resorting to dlesel or hybrid.

On a long run SWMBO's Audi A1 1.4 petrol will give 55 mpg, whereas my diesel Volvo V60 can occasionally manage 50 mpg, more usually 48. OK, the Volvo is bigger and it's an automatic, but it ought at least to level-peg with the Audi. And the 1.4 TSI is much livelier as well as queter than the diesel.

Depending on your lease budget and the size of car you want, one of the VW Group cars with this 1.4 TSI engine should suit you well. The Skoda Octavia (hatch or estate) is a similar size to your i40, but there are plenty of alternative models from VW, Audi and SEAT with this engine.

There are other efficient petrol engines which have come to the market in the past few years - the Peugeot 1.2 and Suzuki 1.4 for example, and the new 1.0 Honda Civic is well reviewed. But some 1.0 engines, notably the one in the Ford Fiesta and Focus, aren't so economical unless driven gently.

It seems as though VAG are still ahead of the pack as regards mpg in their TSi cars, though the latest offerings from Peugeot, Suzuki and Honda have, as you say, been given good reviews, and it'll be interesting to see if they match up in terms of that as well as performance.

One thing I've wondered is that why any of the other manufacturers using small capacity turbo-charged engines haven't used their own take on VAG's cylinder-on-demand technology - whilst VAG will have a patent on the specific tech, there must, like dual clutch gearboxes, be a variation on a theme that can achieve better mpg overall without sacrificing peak performance when required. Whilst there have been the occasional issue with this tech on the VAG 1.4 TSi's, it seems to be far more reliable than the DSG tech, hence my surprise that no-one else has really tried it (or at least for any decent length of time) since VAG did.

If I had to pick the most versatile engine on the market today that gives the best compromise between performance and economy, I would say the 1.4 TSi ACT 140/150 and (hopefully) its replacement in 1.5 guise is it. Its a shame that there aren't more reviews of the Peugeot 1.2 Puretech & Suzuki 1.4 boosterjet from ordinary car buyers to give a more 'real world' opinion of these engines than HJ and his team does during test drives (even extended ones). Hopefully the Honda 1.0T and 1.5T engines will get a reasonable amount of reviews to aid in comparison with the VAG ones.

I would say though that with the OP's high annual mileages at around the 30k mark, diesel seems to me to still be the better bet, though closer than 5 years or so ago, for the moment at least, even with recent changes in taxation and stopping (older) diesel cars driving in major urban areas.

Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - daveyK_UK

Friend test drove a Ioniq, nice car, well built but horrible steering was his summary

Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - Metropolis.

GM have done cylinder deactivation since 1980 with the "V8-6-4" engine. A bit clumsy in operation back then but they've made it almost imperceptible nowadays. I didn't realise other brands were doing it, but these were listed on the net..

Honda's Variable Cylinder Management (VCM)

Chrysler's Multi-Displacement System (MDS)

Daimler AG's Active Cylinder Control (ACC)

Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - Avant

Just for the record, Andy, SWMBO's A1 has the 125 bhp 1.4 engine which doesn't have cylinder de-activation (horrible word). So it's possible that Peugeot, Suzuki and others think that this isn't necessary for efficiency and economy.

Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - Bilboman

Just one teensy little detail regarding the Ioniq (and Niro) is the foot-operated parking brake, which is high up on the left side and has to be pressed both to engage and disengage (think the Windows "ON/OFF" icon). The alternative is to hold the car on footbrake for short stops (no problem of wear and tear there, thanks to the dual clutch gearbox) which is technically a road traffic offence as it dazzles drivers behind with red light. Or a third option is to regularly use Park (and scare the wits out of the driver behind with the brief flash of reversing lights!)
A capable driver can get used to any bonkers (sorry "innovative") system over time, but a nightmare scenario would be a four car family who regularly drive each other's cars, where one is a Mercedes (press PEDAL to engage/pull handle to disengage), another is a Toyota Avensis (press SWITCH to engage, PULL switch or drive off to disengage), one driver has to press the aforementioned pedal ON and press OFF with an Ioniq or Niro and the fourth car has a good old fashioned handbrake.

Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - RT

Just one teensy little detail regarding the Ioniq (and Niro) is the foot-operated parking brake, which is high up on the left side and has to be pressed both to engage and disengage (think the Windows "ON/OFF" icon). The alternative is to hold the car on footbrake for short stops (no problem of wear and tear there, thanks to the dual clutch gearbox) which is technically a road traffic offence as it dazzles drivers behind with red light. Or a third option is to regularly use Park (and scare the wits out of the driver behind with the brief flash of reversing lights!)
A capable driver can get used to any bonkers (sorry "innovative") system over time, but a nightmare scenario would be a four car family who regularly drive each other's cars, where one is a Mercedes (press PEDAL to engage/pull handle to disengage), another is a Toyota Avensis (press SWITCH to engage, PULL switch or drive off to disengage), one driver has to press the aforementioned pedal ON and press OFF with an Ioniq or Niro and the fourth car has a good old fashioned handbrake.

i didn't find the foot-operated parking brake an issue in the Santa Fe, I'd expected issues but none arose.

Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - colinh

Ditto

Also fun is Lane Keep Assist System (LKAS) with the Niro - gives a little "nudge" to the steering wheel if you start wandering out of lane - how have I driven for 50 years without it!?

Hyundai Ioniq? - Next Car - Engineer Andy

Just for the record, Andy, SWMBO's A1 has the 125 bhp 1.4 engine which doesn't have cylinder de-activation (horrible word). So it's possible that Peugeot, Suzuki and others think that this isn't necessary for efficiency and economy.


Not a problem - the 'standard' 1.4 TSI is still a very good engine (I test drove a base spec Scirocco with it and it was surprisingly quick), just that the ACT 140/150bhp version is even better (though this comes at a price), as it apparently has an equal or better mpg figure than for the standard version. Just a shame you, on VWs and SEATs at least, have to get the GT or higher to get that engine - Skoda seem to offer it on their mid-spec SE models, which also have the added benefit of more comfortable wheel and tyre combos as standard.

It'll be interesting to see how the new 1.5 TSi replacing both 1.4s fares - I think the lower powered version has been boosted up to 130bhp, which would suit me fine.

As regards the economy of the other TSi type engines we're mentioning, it would be nice for more reviews (none on this website by owners of these yet) to be made by owners so we can judge real-world mpg and performance - the VAG engine is so widely used it gets a lot of real-world reviews, thus giving a good picture of how good (or not) it is.

 

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