Vendor claims - RobJP

Why should such claims be banned ? If people want to make claims, then they can be held legally liable if those claims are untrue.

People want to hang themselves like that, let them. Darwinism will soon tell.

Vendor claims - Andrew-T

Surely no more illegal than a claim that any business is the 'best in Staffordshire' (or wherever) ? To me it's transparently overstated froth, compared to less obviously untrue statements about the vehicle.

Vendor claims - badbusdriver

Describing a car as being an appreciating classic is not neccessarily rubbish. I read a lot of classic car magazines, and am frankly shocked at some of the cars which are actually appreciating in value. Some of the biggest increases in value over the last few years (percentage wise) are '80s and '90s hot hatchbacks. Were you thinking of a specific car you'd seen advertised?.

As for, 'set to give years of trouble free motoring', it may well be unwise to describe a car like that, but depending on the car, that could be true. A mk1 kia rio for example, is a very drab and uninspiring car, both to look at and to drive. Because of this, a very tidy example with lower than average miles could be had for under £500. Despite this bargin basement price, if it is mechanically sound and free of any serious signs of rust, i'd fully expect it to give years of trouble free motoring.

Vendor claims - Engineer Andy

Describing a car as being an appreciating classic is not neccessarily rubbish. I read a lot of classic car magazines, and am frankly shocked at some of the cars which are actually appreciating in value. Some of the biggest increases in value over the last few years (percentage wise) are '80s and '90s hot hatchbacks. Were you thinking of a specific car you'd seen advertised?.

As for, 'set to give years of trouble free motoring', it may well be unwise to describe a car like that, but depending on the car, that could be true. A mk1 kia rio for example, is a very drab and uninspiring car, both to look at and to drive. Because of this, a very tidy example with lower than average miles could be had for under £500. Despite this bargin basement price, if it is mechanically sound and free of any serious signs of rust, i'd fully expect it to give years of trouble free motoring.

Careful mate, you're giving CK91437 cause to 'comment', saying a KIA can be quite a good buy...

Vendor claims - catsdad
Andrew T is spot on. The underyling law is quite smart when it comes to this sort of thing. There is a term "advertising puff" or "puffery" which allows a degree of freedom in generalised statements.
Vendor claims - Avant

Absolutely, Andrew and Catsdad. In all sales of goods, including private sales, the goods have to be in accordance with any description given - e.g. 'reconditioned engine fitted'. There was a famous case in the 1960s where a 'Triumph Herald 1200' was advertised but it turned out to be a 'cut-and-shut' with a 1200 rear end but a 948 cc front end.

But if the description is vague enough - 'showroom conditiot' has got to be one of the most meaningless - the seller can get away with it. And if Arthur Punter believes it ('Showroom condition - that means it's immaculate') and buys the car, the advert has worked.

Vendor claims - argybargy

Car vendor descriptions also provide limitless opportunities for mangling the language. "Drives excellent" is one that really annoys me. OK, "drives excellently" may not be a particularly graceful phrase, but at least its a tad more grammatically correct.

I remember going to look at a Chevette which had been described as "drives well"--no problem with that description, if accurate. When I got there and took it out, yes, it drove well, but it also had a puddle in the drivers footwell that sloshed about as I drove along. So deep, in fact that I half expected to look down and see a goldfish looking up at me.

Indoor ponds have their place but that place isn't in a car, so I handed to keys back with good grace and went and bought a money pit of a Rover 800 instead. One which was advertised as being in "excellent condition", but was in fact covered in barely concealed rust which I managed to ignore because I'd set my heart on the model.

Edited by argybargy on 09/12/2017 at 08:51

Vendor claims - badbusdriver

The one description of a cars condition that really winds me up up is clean. Clean does not describe the condition of a car, only that it isn't dirty!

Vendor claims - gordonbennet

Most of the guff one can see through, especially dealer speak, if someone who actually maintained their own car writes an ad you can usually tell what the person is like, and 10 minutes on the phone confirms either way.

The Merc estate for sale will be in good condition as a grey from Japan, helped by the usually more sensible Japanese ideas of reasonable care.

As said though it has potential for huge bills and endless trouble, we owned one such model for a brief troublesome 2 years, the first owner had kept the service records in a file and they made sobering reading, the car cost £50k new (invoice present) and i bet it cost near enough the same again over 10 years of servicing and the ridiculous amount of repairs it needed, i still have a E320 coupe and the parts uniqueness to that model makes maintaining one a labour of love...how's about getting on for £400 a side for front wishbones due to welded in bottom ball joint, where the smaller engined range is a replacabel joint @ £15, many other difference apply too.

As for LHD being prestigious in Japan (stated in the ad), well the reason so many LHD W124's went to Japan was because they bought a good few facelift versions of the E500 (as opposed to the more regular euro-sales of 500E pre facelift), you simply couldn't get a RHD V8 W124, you don't see many (any?) LHD Toyota Century's for sale, if any car was about prestige (in its home country) that's the one, oh and wool the mus have for upholstery, being more pleasant and quieter than leather.

Edited by gordonbennet on 10/12/2017 at 08:35

 

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