New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - KB.

Only recently spotted references to it although it was announced a while ago.

I really thought they would have used this re-vamp as an opportunity to substantially improve the NCAP safety rating (currently three stars). But according to the reports it might creep up to four stars by virtue of adding some additional collision avoidance etc. Maybe, in reality, it's as safe as most of its peers but I, for one, would have been encouraged by a better official rating.

Seems a shame as all the reviews of ther Duster make mention of the safety aspect and presumably it puts some off buying one.

It also looks like the only petrol will be a 1.2, which sounds a bit small for, what is, a not especially tiny vehicle that hints towards off road tendencies. The diesel option would have been an obvious choice for many - but these days you're hard pushed to avoid seeing threats of doom and gloom and extra financial penalties therefore I'd have thought a better choice of petrol would be sensible.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - badbusdriver

Judging by the amount i see on the road, i don't think the below par safety rating puts that many people off the duster. Then again, i have suspected for some time that hardly any people put any serious consideration into how safe or otherwise a car is. For the most part it is simply whether or not they like how it looks. Or in Dacia's case, how cheap it is!.

With regards to the 1.2tce, the kind of person likely to be buying one is not going to be overly concerned about how fast the car is. But it is actually a cracking little engine and perfectly suited to the duster, which despite not being a particularly small car, is not very heavy. The 1.2 tce musters 125PS and 205NM (vs 115PS and 156NM of torque for the n/a 1.6) of torque, so bearing in mind that the 4x2 version weighs 1200kg, for anyone other that boy racers or Jeremy Clarkson wannabe's it will be perfectly fine.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - KB.

All noted, ta.

The next part of the equation relates to the transmission. If I'm not mistaken you can only get the twin clutch automatic in diesel form. It could be that that would be a bit of a problem as I'm now accustomed to, and fond of, an automatic car. Maybe the Duster isn't the one for me.

The next possible option might be the petrol Vitara. It comes as a 1.6 non turbo petrol or a turbo 1.4 (which can be specced as an auto.) I've said this before (I think) but the, apparently more desirable, 1.4 only comes as a rather more expensive "S" version and to get the auto version, with metallic, costs £24,600. less whatever discount might be available. Admittedly it has four wheel drive included. You can get the 1.6 two wheel drive automatic (TCSS) for £19,350.

I've forgotten which versions have the torque converter box - I think the 1.4 turbo has it, whereas the 1.6 petrol has the twin clutch ... I think. The diesel auto is definitely twin clutch auto.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - CK91437

Isn't it just a Renault

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - badbusdriver

Isn't it just a Renault

Renault owns Dacia, so obviously there is a very high Renault content in the duster. Not really sure what your point is though?, it is not a new concept, just think back to BL. Of course these days, VAG are the undisputed masters of platform sharing.

Regarding the gearbox, yes you are right, i have also read that the only 2 pedal duster will be the 1.5dci 4x4. But, to be honest, i wouldn't be that keen on buying anything with an automated dual clutch manual gearbox anyway, to many problems.

You might want to consider the Ssangyong tivoli, which is cheap SUV about the same size as the duster. The auto versions of those (both petrol and diesel) use a torque converter auto. But be aware that the petrol tivoli uses a n/a 1.6, so its 'in gear' performance will not be as strong as the 1.2tce duster. It will most likely be less efficient too, but on the upside, the tivoli, like all Ssangyong's comes with a very generous 5 year unlimited mileage warranty. And by the way, the tivoli doesn't score that well in the euro ncap crash tests either.

You pays your money............!

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - KB.

Regarding the gearbox, yes you are right, i have also read that the only 2 pedal duster will be the 1.5dci 4x4. But, to be honest, i wouldn't be that keen on buying anything with an automated dual clutch manual gearbox anyway, to many problems.

You might want to consider the Ssangyong tivoli, which is cheap SUV about the same size as the duster. The auto versions of those (both petrol and diesel) use a torque converter auto. But be aware that the petrol tivoli uses a n/a 1.6, so its 'in gear' performance will not be as strong as the 1.2tce duster. It will most likely be less efficient too, but on the upside, the tivoli, like all Ssangyong's comes with a very generous 5 year unlimited mileage warranty. And by the way, the tivoli doesn't score that well in the euro ncap crash tests either.

You pays your money............!

Fair point .... they had caught my eye when, on the few occasions, I've seen one on the road. Round my way you rarely see them... the dealer isn't conveniently placed. The reviews aren't generally glowing but I could see the possible appeal. As it happens the front passenger's safety rating is better than most ... it's all green! ...not many are. but three stars doesn't sit comfortably when the Vitara has five and when the Vitara seems a more sensible buy. However the warranty, as you say, deserves credit on the Tivoli. But I don't think it's for me. The current car is still pleasing us and it might stay with us for a while yet - but it does no harm to wonder what might replace it.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - KB.

Isn't it just a Renault

And what, exactly, are you contributing to the discussion?

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - argybargy

Dacias appear to be very competitive price wise, and like contributors above I've begun to notice a lot of them on the road.

Plenty of low mileage examples of the Duster at reasonable prices on Autodoofer, the only obvious problem being that the model lacks the aesthetic appeal of some of its rivals.

What do the Backroomers think of them as a used choice?

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - klu01dbt

As I understand the NCAP results they give a lot of their marks for passive safety, things like extra airbags and various electronic gizmos. If these are not present on base versions then the whole car will be marked down.

The basic Dacias are really very basic. If you are thinking of buying a higher model Dacia its probably worth having a good read of how the actual NCAP score was allocated and seeing if it was marked down for equipment on a higher level car, but not on the base model.

Hypothetical example: A base model car lacks side airbags and electronic braking control. This leads to 2 stars being taken off the NCAP result. A mid trim level has these features, but still has the lower NCAP result.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - badbusdriver

All noted, ta.

The next part of the equation relates to the transmission. If I'm not mistaken you can only get the twin clutch automatic in diesel form. It could be that that would be a bit of a problem as I'm now accustomed to, and fond of, an automatic car. Maybe the Duster isn't the one for me.

The next possible option might be the petrol Vitara. It comes as a 1.6 non turbo petrol or a turbo 1.4 (which can be specced as an auto.) I've said this before (I think) but the, apparently more desirable, 1.4 only comes as a rather more expensive "S" version and to get the auto version, with metallic, costs £24,600. less whatever discount might be available. Admittedly it has four wheel drive included. You can get the 1.6 two wheel drive automatic (TCSS) for £19,350.

I've forgotten which versions have the torque converter box - I think the 1.4 turbo has it, whereas the 1.6 petrol has the twin clutch ... I think. The diesel auto is definitely twin clutch auto.

Sorry KB, I didn't read all the way through this post!. The 1.4 turbo vitara has the dual clutch gearbox, the n/a 1.6 has a torque converter auto. But I wouldn't write this version off before a test drive, as it seems to be pretty well regarded by the motoring press. The vitara, if memory serves, is even lighter than the duster, so it's 118bhp (I think) 1.6 should be perfectly capable in most circumstances. The only area it may struggle with would be overtaking on single carriageway roads at higher speeds due to the relative lack of torque. I've also read that the vitara can be a bit vocal at higher speeds, which I guess would be a symptom of its lack of weight (sound deadening material is very heavy).

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - KB.

Just a quick point .... Are you sure the 1.4 Turbo "S" has the twin clutch? I recall the dealer telling me that the 1.4 "S" has a torque converter (as well as four wheel drive as standard) and that the 1.6 petrols and the 1.6 diesel both had TCSS (Twin Clutch System by Suuzuki).

But having had a look on the Suzuki website it does specifically say the diesel is TCSS (i.e twin clutch) ... but just says "Automatic" in both the 1.6 and the 1.4 version descriptions.

Edited by KB. on 06/12/2017 at 20:11

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - badbusdriver

Just a quick point .... Are you sure the 1.4 Turbo "S" has the twin clutch? I recall the dealer telling me that the 1.4 "S" has a torque converter (as well as four wheel drive as standard) and that the 1.6 petrols and the 1.6 diesel both had TCSS (Twin Clutch System by Suuzuki).

But having had a look on the Suzuki website it does specifically say the diesel is TCSS (i.e twin clutch) ... but just says "Automatic" in both the 1.6 and the 1.4 version descriptions.

Well, i had been sure, but after doing some research, i'm not any more!. Without registering with suzuki, which you need to do in order to download a brochure, i can't find out for sure. What little i could find out suggests that the 1.4t does have a torque converter auto. I'd have to assume that your dealer knows what he is talking about, but, my problem with that assumption is that i am 90% certain the 1.6 n/a petrol is a torque converter auto!. That the diesel has a dual clutch gearbox can possibly be explained away by the fact that it is a fiat engine and fiat themselves do not do a torque converter auto. So what i would suggest is downloading a pdf brochure off the website to check the exact wording on the specs. I do have a vitara pdf on my phone which i managed to download last year, but it does not list the 1.4t.

However, under transmissions for the 1.6 petrol, the options are: 5 speed manual or 6 speed auto.

For the 1.6 diesel, they are: 6 speed manual or TCSS.

Not really sure why it should be so difficult to find out this info?!

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - daveyjp
The 1.2 will be a four cylinder version of the 0.9 three cylinder turbo, which is a great engine in our all be it lighter smart forfour. With 125 ps it will be more than capable.

Go to Russia and you won’t see a Dacia, they are all Renaults.
New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - RichT54

I also found it difficult to work out what type of auto gearbox the Vitara S 1.4 had when I test drove one a few weeks ago. The brochure didn't didn't specify the type, but the salesman said it wasn't a dual clutch or CVT. However, when I compared the official fuel consumption figures for the manual vs automatic, they were very close, so if it is a torque convertor type, it must be a remarkably efficient one.

One thing I didn't like was that every time I moved the selector from drive to reverse and from reverse to drive, the stop-start system kicked in and stopped the engine and then restarted it.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - KB.

That "stop/start" malarkey sounds outrageous. Surely there must be a way round it? But equally surely the salesman (who you would have queried it with) should have had the answer to the conundrum?

What sort of impression was you left with after the drive?

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - RichT54

I was originally interested in the S-Cross which is also available with the 1.4, but they only had a 1.0 so the salesman suggested I had a test drive in that to get an idea of the car and then I could have a test drive in a Vitara S with the 1.4 to get an idea of the engine. Both were automatics.

I found the S-Cross with the 1.0 very underpowered and was disappointed with the way it handled on bumpy road surfaces. The Vitara S was smoother and the extra power from the 1.4 engine was noticeable (but nowhere near as good as my A3 1.4 TFSI). However, at speed, tyre noise was very intrusive.There was also an annoying rattle from the dash.

The shifts from the gearboxes were smooth but both cars exhibited the same stop-start issue when changing direction. I suppose it's possible that if you move the gear lever quick enough it might not happen?

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - Falkirk Bairn

A quick google on Booster Jet Vitara

Suzuki explain, a six speed automated manual transmission that incorporates hydraulically controlled clutches and a gear change assembly that enables it to be driven in a similar way to an automatic gearbox. The system utilises one clutch for 1st, 3rd and 5th gears and the other for 2nd, 4th and 6th gears. Operating the transmission in this way ensures that whether the driver is accelerating or decelerating, the desired gear is instantly available.

That's off my shopping list & maybe yours

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - Avant

"One thing I didn't like was that every time I moved the selector from drive to reverse and from reverse to drive, the stop-start system kicked in and stopped the engine and then restarted it."

I think that happens with most automatics, where the engine stops if you brake to a halt - which you have to do before getting into reverse. It's not so bad with manuals, as if you stop and then immediately reverse you have the clutch down.

I've got into the habit of disabling start-stop each time as soon as I start the engine, as I find it as irritating as most of you do. It's useful if one is stuck in a long traffic jam, which is the only time it really saves appreciable fuel.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - KB.

Ta for previous advice and opinions.

Never had stop/start myself - how convenient is it to turn it off in circumstances such as those described?

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - RichT54

I have had two cars with stop/start although both were manuals and, as Avant says, if you keep the clutch down then the engine will not cut out. In addition, both of those cars had a button that would disable the the stop/start system (although it would be re-enabled the next time you turned on the ignition).

I would be very surprised if the Vitara didn't have a similar override, but I didn't ask about at the time because I had pretty much decided against the car by then.

One other thing I forgot to mention about the Vitara S test drive was that when driving at speed the steering was a bit vague when pointing straight ahead, requiring frequent minor adjustments to keep straight, which was similar to an Accord I had several years ago.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - CK91437

I wouldn't touch a Renault (then dacia) with a bargepole.

but it's the op's money.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - badbusdriver

I wouldn't touch a Renault (then dacia) with a bargepole.

but it's the op's money.

Well that's grand, and it's nice that you can take the time to make a useful contribution to the thread.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - KB.

I wouldn't touch a Renault (then dacia) with a bargepole.

but it's the op's money.

Well that's grand, and it's nice that you can take the time to make a useful contribution to the thread.

I have a suspicion that this particular member is posting in order to gain attention and invoke the sort of comments that I've made about him elsewhere recently (I think it was the one about a hairline crack in a gearbox casing). Hard as is it (because his replies are really banal and pointless and warrant a spot of abuse) I would think it's probably best if I cease to take the bait in the knowledge that he'll stop posting soon when he realises no-one's taking any notice.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - Manatee

I wouldn't touch a Renault (then dacia) with a bargepole.

I would. Limited depreciation because they are so cheap, run it for the warranty period, then take a view.

If more people had a clue about sensible spending and less interest in imagined status I think there would be a lot more Dacias sold.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - alan1302

I wouldn't touch a Renault (then dacia) with a bargepole.

but it's the op's money.

Instead of sayng what not to buy how about saying what they should consider instead

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - SLO76

I wouldn't touch a Renault (then dacia) with a bargepole.

but it's the op's money.

I rather like them. Simple and based on older tried and tested Renault technology so they're generally ok. In typical Renault fashion they'll become a bit loose and rattly at 5yrs plus but certainly the petrol 1.2,1.6 and diesel 1.5 dci motors are among the most reliable French designs. The jury is still out on the 0.9 TCe but I'm not hearing any horror stories from any Renault owners with them so far. As for the NCAP rating well without the costly crash avoidance tech we're seeing in dearer motors it's impossible to gain headline grabbing scores today. It's not that the cars are inherently unsafe it's that they are a budget offering without the same passive systems.
New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - diddy1234

Ive had my Duster DCI (in laureate trim) for nearly two years and nothing and i mean nothing has gone wrong.

In some ways it's a shame as I have another two years before I can change mine as I am already looking at the new duster due out 2018.

I hear the next version has 6 seats. hmm

Possibly go for the automatic diesel next time but would have to test drive first.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - badbusdriver

Ive had my Duster DCI (in laureate trim) for nearly two years and nothing and i mean nothing has gone wrong.

In some ways it's a shame as I have another two years before I can change mine as I am already looking at the new duster due out 2018.

I hear the next version has 6 seats. hmm

Possibly go for the automatic diesel next time but would have to test drive first.

I think it unlikely that the next duster, as is, will have 6 seats. If it is to have more than 5 seats, it would be 7. Dacia paints itself as a no nonsense budget brand and making the next duster a 6 seater would mean replacing the current rear bench with 2 separate seats. Also, I don't think the duster is actually big enough to have 3 rows of seats. Maybe if they do a lwb version?.

Re the 'auto' gearbox, just bear in mind that this is a dual clutch automated manual, of the type forum members advise against, due to the reliability and driveability issues.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - argybargy

Of course, it could be that unlike Ford, Dacia have managed to make a success of the dual clutch automated manual.

I've just done a ( fairly brief) trawl of Google and I can't actually find any horror stories about the Dacia dual clutch.

Compare that with the significant number of complaints about Powershift (just to pluck an example out of the air) and you might be looking at something altogether different, although I fully appreciate the need to exercise caution when other manufacturers have got it so badly wrong.

Edit: there are a few articles about Dacias in which a "judder" is mentioned, but they don't appear to be dual clutch related.

Edited by argybargy on 08/12/2017 at 09:53

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - daveyjp
If the gearbox is the same one as fitted to the latest smart petrol, a dual clutch Getrag, there may be reports of problems from their owners.

The old 5 speed auto manual Getrag box in smarts was hardly the most refined, but reliability was generally good. I recently read of an owner with 150,000 on his 16 year old smart and it is on its original clutch.

Edited by daveyjp on 08/12/2017 at 10:39

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - KB.

"Re the 'auto' gearbox, just bear in mind that this is a dual clutch automated manual, of the type forum members advise against, due to the reliability and driveability issues."

Not ALL forum members. I'm one of those who do actually own a DSG and I don't constantly complain about it. Had it for six years too, so am speaking from experience unlike some/many/most who seem to read about them and assume they must all be bad.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - Manatee
I hope you're right. On the way to Heathrow this morning our DSG Skoda went into 2nd or 3rd with a real bang on a light throttle, moving off at a roundabout. No further symptoms on the journey, to my relief. Never done it before, and it has been driven in accordance with the Manuel, I.e. no holding the car on the accelerator.

I'm resigned to it handing in its resignation at some point, but I'd rather it didn't do it at 15,000 miles when I want to catch a flight.

Maybe time to look for a Mazda auto to replace it. I don't rate VAG very highly, but they are not alone. Cars seem.to have become less reliable with innovation. Pethaps obsolete Renaults are the way to go!
New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - KB.

^^ Point taken ... and, of course, I'm very aware of the problems and issues associated with them. To be honest I wonder what I might replace it with ... another Skoda? ... one of the advantages is the dealer seems trustworthy and is conveniently sited and they collect and deliver for routine servicing and an extra two year extended warranty could be had for a couple hundred pounds thus relieving any worries about the DSG for another five years.

Regrettably the Yeti replacement is substantially dearer, longer, wider and lower ... not what I wanted ... and the Seat Arona or VW T Roc are nearer in size (have you seen how much you can pay for a T Roc? - I'd have to pay £31,000 for an automatic!)

The Dacia can have its warranty similarly extended and my nearest Suzuki dealer extends the warranty for the year subsequent to their doing the annual service thus offering a virtual unlimited period of warranty.

Not actually sure what extended warranty Mazda offers that would take it to five years but, clearly, we would assume that a Mazda torque converter transmission is likely to perform reliably - and, as an example, the CX3 seems highly rated but I haven't seen one close up in the flesh... and they're not cheap.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - Manatee

Ours was bought pre reg and bizarrely not eligible, I was told, for a waaranty extension or I would have done it. They also said I couldn't have a service plan but then decided I could when I showed them the Ts & Cs that said otherwise.

Herself likes the Roomster so I might have to keep it. If it breaks it will be my fault of course.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - badbusdriver

Of course, it could be that unlike Ford, Dacia have managed to make a success of the dual clutch automated manual.

I've just done a ( fairly brief) trawl of Google and I can't actually find any horror stories about the Dacia dual clutch.

Compare that with the significant number of complaints about Powershift (just to pluck an example out of the air) and you might be looking at something altogether different, although I fully appreciate the need to exercise caution when other manufacturers have got it so badly wrong.

Edit: there are a few articles about Dacias in which a "judder" is mentioned, but they don't appear to be dual clutch related.

That's probably because you currently can't get an automatic Dacia, at least not in the UK.

The 'new' duster being spoken about will be the 1st 'auto' Dacia, but it hasn't been released yet. I think it is due out early next year.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - KB.

That's probably because you currently can't get an automatic Dacia, at least not in the UK.

Why do you say you can't buy a Duster automatic when they show a Dci 110 diesel from £15,495 on their own website?

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - madf

That's probably because you currently can't get an automatic Dacia, at least not in the UK.

Why do you say you can't buy a Duster automatic when they show a Dci 110 diesel from £15,495 on their own website?

tinyurl.com/y9tn6ngt auto Dacias secondhand...even...

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - badbusdriver

Apologies, I thought I had read that the 2018 duster would be the 1st Dacia auto. After looking it up, I now see it was introduced in December last year.

That still isn't very much time to assess the reliability of the gearbox in the duster though. Probably worth looking up any Renault models with that engine/gearbox combo.

New (well, sort of new) Dacia Duster next year - argybargy

As far as I can tell from reading the forums where these things tend to be discussed, the Powershift (again to pluck an example out of the air for no particular reason) began to exhibit problems as soon as it was introduced, with buyers of new cars experiencing judder and missed/ wrong gear changes within a few hundred miles of taking delivery.

If the Dacia EDC isn't yet showing signs of disintegrating a year after being introduced, its probably a hopeful sign.

 

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