Any - Keyless remotes vulnerable - pullgees

Another case in the papers this morning of thieves relaying the signal from a remote inside a house to a Mercedes on the driveway. Why can't these remotes have an on/off button just like a tv remote? Is that so difficult?

Edited by Avant on 27/11/2017 at 23:28

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - RichT54

There appear to be a lot of "Keyless Entry Fob Signal Guard Blocker" type products on Ebay and Amazon. Anyone know if they really work?

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - RobJP

Anything that will act as a Faraday cage will do the job perfectly.

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - gordonbennet

Isn't keyless go an answer to another question that nobody asked.

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - badbusdriver

Isn't keyless go an answer to another question that nobody asked.

Without wishing to sound sexist, i think it is something which women in general would appreciate more than men. Most men would have the car keys in their pocket, so very easy to find them, whip them out and press the button. But a lot of women would have the keys in their handbag, and given the size of handbags these days, that could entail a 15 minute search to fish them out.

Our jazz has keyless entry and while it wouldn't make any difference to me whether it had or hadn't, i know my wife likes it.

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - Engineer Andy

Isn't keyless go an answer to another question that nobody asked.

Excellent responses from RobJP and gordonbennet.

To add to that, I came across (another) decent tip by US YouTube mechanic Scotty Kilmer - that when in public car parks, etc, he said that the most secure way to lock/unlock you car was to just put the key in the lock and turn, rather than use the button on the fob remotely.

This was because the very same criminals will use their scanner (hiding behind another car or collumn or pretendeing to be another driver) to nab your remote's code or hack the key when you use it remotely and use their own bit of tech to open your car door as if they had the key. Even if that doesn't mean they steal the car (if its not easy to 'hotwire' it), they could still steal from it.

How ironic that the latest security car tech is actually MORE vulnerable to theft of cars than those of 10-20 years ago. You'd have thought they would've learned their lessons by now, given this has been an issue with remote garage door systems for some time now, well before the technology was introduced into cars on an industry-wide scale.

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - nailit

I've not read the article but have seen similar. I tested the mazda 6 by wrapping the fob in k I t ching* foil and I couldn't open the door. I tried the fob in an old tobacco tin and it failed close up it opened the door (you use an alternate method to pressing the fob by pressing a small rubber button in the handle BTW) Mind you it was golden Virginia tin :-)

I recall reading that some manufacturer used a different sequence of numerical code each transmission to avoid hacking, only to be discovered by thieves it was simply the next sequential number! Also I think not all cars are open to this type of hacking?

Edited by nailit on 27/11/2017 at 19:31

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - TedCrilly

The owner of the Merc' was in some ways lucky.

Having it taken by stealth is far better than having it taken by force. Maybe the thieves had a plan B. Kick the back door through, rush the place and slap him and his missus about until they handed over the key. Then tied them up before driving off into the moonlight. Don't laugh it happened to a mate of mine and his Impreza was never seen again.

The fact remains and it has been proven many times, if someone wants your car and if they are desperate enough, they will find a way to take it.

Car security? Be careful what you wish for.

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - Engineer Andy

The owner of the Merc' was in some ways lucky.

Having it taken by stealth is far better than having it taken by force. Maybe the thieves had a plan B. Kick the back door through, rush the place and slap him and his missus about until they handed over the key. Then tied them up before driving off into the moonlight. Don't laugh it happened to a mate of mine and his Impreza was never seen again.

The fact remains and it has been proven many times, if someone wants your car and if they are desperate enough, they will find a way to take it.

Car security? Be careful what you wish for.

Indeed - though many people I know over the years often leave their car keys by the door nearest to their car, often conveniently on a window sill. Conevnient for the thieves as well...

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - pullgees

All these inconvenient methods of screening off the remote - baco foil, tins, faraday bags etc - when all the manufacturers have to do is have an on/off button on the keyless remote.

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - RichT54

All these inconvenient methods of screening off the remote - baco foil, tins, faraday bags etc - when all the manufacturers have to do is have an on/off button on the keyless remote.

You can put a Toyota "Smart entry & start system" electronic key in battery saving mode by pressing the unlock button twice while holding the lock button.

When the battery saving mode is set, the smart entry & start system cannot be used.

To cancel the function, you press any of the electronic key buttons.

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - argybargy

Typically off topic, but I remember an episode of Top Gear where Clarkson demonstrated how you could extend the range of your remote unlocker by pointing the thing at your head rather than at the car.

Might be old news to many, but it actually worked with our old Focus.

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - FP

I think you had to touch your head with it as you activated it, so you head acted as an aerial.

Yes, it worked.

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - argybargy

I think you had to touch your head with it as you activated it, so you head acted as an aerial.

Yes, it worked.

I think it works for me without touching my head, which would explain why my Dad used to move me around above the TV when the footy was on..

It was one of those things they used to come up with that made you say "Naaaaa"....but you had to try it, and I was astonished when the lights flashed.

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - Andrew-T

My daughter just avoided another snag with her husband's keyless car. The two of them set off together, then she dropped him off somewhere and continued. Twenty miles later she realised he still had the necessary start-key. Hasty phone calls followed and some hasty back-tracking so that she could risk stopping the engine.

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - RobJP

My daughter just avoided another snag with her husband's keyless car. The two of them set off together, then she dropped him off somewhere and continued. Twenty miles later she realised he still had the necessary start-key. Hasty phone calls followed and some hasty back-tracking so that she could risk stopping the engine.

I'm surprised. If the person with the key on them gets out of a BMW, warning 'bong', visible warning on dash, warning message on iDrive display, saying (words to the extent of) "key not in car. You will not be able to restart car if you stop the engine"

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - daveyjp
Same happened with a friend and their Range Rover.

Wife got out with key, husband drove off unaware he didn’t have the key.

Edited by daveyjp on 28/11/2017 at 06:58

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - TedCrilly

Not really the fault of the manufacturer or the system though is it?

If you are cynical enough you will find a negative with anything.

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - gordonbennet

As for violent burglars breaking in and taking keys by force.

Unless you've been living in a parallel world for the past few years, it can't have passed many by that we, the general public (not the important people or elites) are on our own now, you can forget the police as far as this sort of thing goes, and i'm not knocking the bobby that was once on the beat who would love nothing more than to lock low lifes up and chuck the key away, i'm referring to the politicised leadership of the failing service who have forgetten what it was Peel envisaged.

Proper fences, lockable gates, that require some danger agility and noise to pass without opening, decent windows and doors, and most importantly a proper regularly serviced burglar alarm.

No these things won't stop them getting in, but maybe a one way handle on your bedroom door so unable to be opened from the other side once you've slammed it shut and activated your side, and preferably at least one dog in the house which you allow to roam free in your secured garden during the day, to help deter any watchers, plus whatever else you might consider worth keeping in your bedroom.

I'm not suggesting necessarily fighting thugs, unless you feel up to it of course, but the country has changed and its time we took this type of thing seriously and made your homes as difficult as possible for the thief or worse.

We had the system serviced last week, and i asked the engineer if he could see any weak points needing attention, the answer was no.

It doesn't cost that much to make your home more secure, SWMBO feels much happier in such knowledge.

Worth a thought.

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - nailit

Hmm...if we were in the US of A I would have a gun and would not hesitate to use it on any unwanted intruder/burglar.

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - argybargy

We have an alarm which is generally only used when we go away overnight.

We used to have a dog but he would have been more likely to greet any burglar than bark at him.

I keep a cricket bat by the bed and we have decent locks on the doors. I don't think our neighbourhood is prone to burglaries, though I have seen local reports of prowlers on social media, some of which are almost certainly attention seeking by the posters.

An ex work colleague of mine had his car keys and his Dad's car keys stolen via the classic "hook on a bamboo pole through the letterbox" method. He got his car back relatively unscathed, his Dad's was never seen again. We keep our keys close by at all times and leave nothing valuable in view of someone outside the windows.

We have movement activated lights front and back, and at this time of year anyone trying to access our garden from the field next door, which is considerably higher than our property, would end up enjoying a long mud slide onto concrete.

Not much else you can do, really, except keep paying your insurance.

Like you, GB, I have little faith in the ability of the police to protect us. Not because the average bobby isn't committed to preventing and tackling crime, but because their political masters are more concerned with public impressions that enhance their career aspirations than with effective actions that keep the public safe.

In years to come only those who can afford to pay extra will have the protection of the law because private security guards will increasingly be used to fill the hole left by the police as they retreat from our streets. .

Edited by argybargy on 28/11/2017 at 10:16

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - bolt

I also find it strange that some people leave things in open sight on seats/dashboard and in rear window view, I often see cars that have had windows smashed for the thief to take whatever was in there

my mate had his motor broken into, and although he moaned about what was stolen,an expensive camera left on rear seat, he said oh the insurance would cover it

(they didn`t as the camera was in plain sight) Personaly I wont leave anything in the car just in case, clearly a lot do

Any - Keyless remotes vunerable - gordonbennet

We had the burglar alarm wired so the remote plipper, which stays with us in the bedroom, activates all circuits apart from the one in the bedroom (children long fledged), when we go out if we use the control panel to arm/disarm and that then includes the sensor in the bedroom, we like the alarm on at night we like the rest of the house set for early warning, you could always cover the bedroom sensor and still have the house alarmed at night.

Good point about perimeter PIR lights, well worth the time and relatively low cost.

I think if you make your place appear a difficult/dangerous prospect, you are far less likely to find yourself a victim, our dogs have become much more territorial since George, our sprocker pup was born here, we are the only people and this the only home he has ever known and despite being only 18 months old is fiercely protective of it and his mistress especially, this has rubbed off on the other two now and all hell breaks loose when someone presses the intercom at the top of the drive.

Edited by gordonbennet on 28/11/2017 at 10:31

 

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