Violence from motor bikers. - beershark
Are the others who are concerned about the above ? Motor bikers weave through traffic often at high speed. This makes them very hard to see in rear view mirrors, so when are driver carries out a manoeuvre, such as lane changing, the biker, being erstwhile invisible, quickly looms into view and then angrily disputes the driver's action. This frequently manifests itself by the biker striking the car by punching or kicking. It seems to me that the frequency of cameras worn by bikers gives them carte blanche to threaten or attack motorists, secure in the misplaced knowledge that " I've got you on camera " ! Worse yet is when bikers, in groups, then surround the motorist in a very threatening manner ; this is truly terrifying.
Violence from motor bikers. - RobJP

So you complain about bikers weaving through traffic and making dangerous maneuvers, whilst wearing body cameras.

But then you complain about them using the same cameras to point out other people's failings and dangerous maneuvers. In spite of the fact that their own will have been caught on the same piece of footage.

As to bikers ' surrounding and threatening' motorists, well, I've never seen that, and I live in biker 'suicide alley', also known as North Wales, where we have the 'Evo triangle'.

Violence from motor bikers. - SLO76
In 24yrs of driving I've never once had bother with bikers. Be aware of your surroundings and leave enough room for bikes to filter through and they'll treat you with respect too. The one thing that will get them riled is unobservant car drivers pulling out in front of them or blocking their progress through congestion.
Violence from motor bikers. - KB.

Strangely enough, in 50 years of driving, I too have never been intimidated by a motorcyclist ... either a lone one or those in groups.

Having said thet though I don't live in the Peak District. I would imagine the sheer volume of motorcyclists in that area on a sunny Sunday or Bank Holiday could increase the odds of encountering such a thing. I've seen that sort of thing happening when they're uploaded onto Youtube - but most of the instances I recall have been abroad, not in the UK. But, as always, I stand to be corrected.

I do happen to live quite close to a route that IS used by motorcyclists on the weekend/bank holiday (it includes a part of Dartmoor that must a be a well known and favoured "route") and I will agree that the speed they manage to achieve on a particular straight stretch within earshot of my house (half a mile away) and the progress they make on the subsequent bendy bits are bordering on the breathtaking ... and quite a few have come to grief thereabouts. One finished up colliding with a vehicle and flying through the air and landing on the roof of an adjacent house. Now that has go to hurt - in fact that one died, as have plenty others. But they either know the risks and are prepared to take a chance ... or they don't know the risks, in which case Darwin's Rules kick in.

Edited by KB. on 11/10/2017 at 11:56

Violence from motor bikers. - daveyjp

I have no problem moving over for bikers, letting them filter down queues etc - they are on a bike and have taken a choice which means they can get to places quicker tham me.

I will also happily slow and indicate left to let them know I have seen them so they can then pass knowing I am aware of their presence.

However the wave of acknowledgement from bikers in thanks is becoming a thing of the past.

Violence from motor bikers. - alan1302

Seems more liley the ops driving is making him become a target rather than there being loads of angry bikers everywhere.

Violence from motor bikers. - nick62

I have not ridden on the road for the past 10 years, mainly due to my bikes being more suited to track day use, (and Oulton Park on a warm sunny day is hard to beat). Riding a quick superbike on the roads where I live is just a PITA.

Whenever I see a bike approaching in the mirror when in slow moving traffic I always give them some room on whichever side they are on, and almost without fail I get a nod / wave / leg stuck-out in apprecaition.

Not sure what the OP is doing to be "surrounded" by a gang?

Violence from motor bikers. - 520i

I must say that I don't see it as the car driver's obligation to arrange their vehicle to accommodate the filtering biker when sitting in a queue. If there's space for a bike to pass through then all well and good, and if I happen to see one approaching I'll move over where I can if need be, but it isn't my first consideration. I pull up in the 'natural' position, the queue ahead and behind being the main focus of my attentions when coming to a stop. The speed at which a small minority of bikers choose to pass through standing traffic, regardless of available space, is plainly stupid and leaves precious little margin to deal with their misjudgements or for others to see them. Most are intelligent enough to keep the speed down thankfully.

The 'tailgater' brigade worry me at times as well, sitting a few feet off your rear corner with a rapid trip through your rear windscreen beckoning if you have to hit the brakes. I quite often wouldn't fancy their chances.

Violence from motor bikers. - Engineer Andy

An incident happened to me when there was a 'bikers ride' in Cornwall whilst I was on holiday a few years ago. Most holidaymakers there didn't know it was going to happen, which also was on a Saturday (when people come down or go home - far busier out and about), and I (amongst many other holidaymakers) was driving to the local supermarket from where I was staying, when suddenly 500+ bikers suddenly took up the entire road, including on a dual carriageway and off into the area near the supermaket/out-of-twon shopping park (it was actually marshalled! - who was the idiot who organised that on the busiest day of the week?

Anyway, many were bombing along the dual carriageway at easily 100mph, then slamming on the anchors to go down the slip road to the supermarket area and onto other roads, many diving in front of my car, alongside (room only really for one vehicle) and directly behind. Having to brake very sharply and keep an eye out in three directions almost simultaneously was very difficult and some of the bikers were shouting and swearing at both myself and other road users, none of whom had done anything to warrant such behaviour. Once I had parked up at the supermarket, I reported this incident to the marshall, who, admitedly was angry at the bikers, but to be honest he couldn't do much.

Very badly organised, and, poor road manners from the bikers.

Violence from motor bikers. - gordonbennet

Bikers are just like any other group of people, a whole cross section of society, so you will find decent well mannered gentlemen/women right through to nasty and unpleasant ill mannered louts...you'll find the same variety driving lorries buses and rolls royces and pushing perambulators, and in every job description you ca think of.

Unfortunately in a group bullies can do their thing due to weight of numbers where they would be entirely different on their own.

Edited by gordonbennet on 11/10/2017 at 18:53

Violence from motor bikers. - KB.

Was going to say what GB just said, but for some reason lost the impetus to do so (I think I was called to fry the fish). But it's so true that some individuals who wouldn't say boo to a goose whilst on their own, become ogres when in a group. We all saw it at school and keep on seeing day to day the world over... and will keep seeing it until we die [will there be a single, polite, mourner or a group o thugs at the graveside? :-) ]

When at work there was a crew of blokes (yes, they were virtually all blokes in them days) at a paticular fire station that I had to do shifts at from time to time. As a group (or actually more like a gang) they had the capacity to make life an utter misery for anyone they didn't approve of ... and that included the officer in charge who they almost sent round the bend due to having to try to manage these thugs!. Others used to say that individually they were all "nice blokes" when you got them on their own ... however I never saw it that way: my view was that if they are thoroughly vicious, vindictive and downright unpleasant when gathered together in a group, then they are not what I would call a "nice bloke" as individuals and I had nothing to do with any of them.

There, I feel better for getting that off my chest :-)

Edited by KB. on 11/10/2017 at 21:43

Violence from motor bikers. - nick62

Was going to say what GB just said, but for some reason lost the impetus to do so (I think I was called to fry the fish). But it's so true that some individuals who wouldn't say boo to a goose whilst on their own, become ogres when in a group. We all saw it at school and keep on seeing day to day the world over... and will keep seeing it until we die [will there be a single, polite, mourner or a group o thugs at the graveside? :-) ]

When at work there was a crew of blokes (yes, they were virtually all blokes in them days) at a paticular fire station that I had to do shifts at from time to time. As a group (or actually more like a gang) they had the capacity to make life an utter misery for anyone they didn't approve of ... and that included the officer in charge who they almost sent round the bend due to having to try to manage these thugs!. Others used to say that individually they were all "nice blokes" when you got them on their own ... however I never saw it that way: my view was that if they are thoroughly vicious, vindictive and downright unpleasant when gathered together in a group, then they are not what I would call a "nice bloke" as individuals and I had nothing to do with any of them.

There, I feel better for getting that off my chest :-)

You have just made me realise why (after nearly 25 years self-employment, 95% of which is working autonomously), I don't miss the "banter" of working in a "team".

Violence from motor bikers. - jc2

And the "officer" shouldn't have been made an officer if he hadn't the skills to make their lives a misery when needed.

Violence from motor bikers. - KB.

On the face of it a reasonable observation to make.

In today's workplace climate it's an even better made point I'm sure.

But in 1974 things were different... like it or not.

I respectfully ask if you were there? Have you seen the combined influence that 20 hard nosed and time-served blokes - all of one mind - can exert on the one bloke in the postion of managing them - at a time when that "officer's" management structure had no inclination to support him.

At that time, people in the job lived with each other for 15 hour shifts ... ate and slept together (though not generally in the same bed), trained together, dealt with all sorts of taxing and odd (and sometimes hazardous) situations together, relaxed during down time together, socialised outside the job together. And if the pack mentality takes a hold (as it was allowed to do in those days) then one supervising officer has his hands full if the others take against hime(which they did).

I have to say that was a one off insofar as that particular bunch was the exception. Other watches on the same station weren't like that and I knew of no other station anywhere else that was so bad (but they might have existed for all I know).

The word we're looking for is "bullying" and you must know as well as I do that it went on despite all the protocols that were/are supposed to prevent it. It has gone on in every walk of life ... education, church, politics, sport, government ... absolutely everywhere. If your face doesn't fit, you're very often in trouble and whilst PC attitudes and Health and Safety and Equality legislation is now seemingly tighter than ever I bet it goes on behind closed doors as we speak.

Violence from motor bikers. - gordonbennet

Of course bullying still goes on, just not so obvious methods employed.

But then some people haven't a clue when they've got a good job and can't help but take the P out of it, sickies etc, in some ways these P takers are bullying their colleagues who have to take up the slack and make up their often poor performance when they do actually show up and molly coddle them or they'll be off with stress 5 mins later, it doesn't take a genius to work out why the east europeans many of whom have a very old fashioned work ethic are so readily employed.

Arguably P takers are also bullying the company into paying them to not work.

 

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