any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - barney100

It seems the larger cars get the smaller the space available. Many roads round here have had cycle lanes added...hardly see a bike on them...dual carriageways with a lane painted out and the odd bollard stuck in the middle. Many roads closed altogether so we all go the same way. Give way to oncoming traffic in the middle of nowhere have proliferated. What's your area like?

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - gordonbennet

Its all highly amusing, in this age of trying to save the planet they send you all around the town when your destination was quarter the distance directly, where junctions were once free flowing they put traffic lights on so everyone has to come to a stop for no reason then get moving again.

They put in by passes and dual carriageways then stick as many roundabouts or traffic light controlled junctions as they can fit in so going round the town/village is as slow as going through.

I find this laughable with the much hyped proposed trials of lorry platooning (kerching for those involved), which IF it works will save cupfuls of fuel due to slipstreaming, where stopping and starting those same lorries for no reason whatsoever uses gallons..i read somewhere it cost near enough £5 in fuel alone to accelerate a 44 ton artic to 55mph limiter cruising speed, on the level, i don't doubt it.

Its the same everywhere Barney right up to the very top, both locally and nationally, the lunatics are running the asylum, but we keep voting them in.

Edited by gordonbennet on 28/09/2017 at 12:43

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - Andrew-T

I read somewhere it cost near enough £5 in fuel alone to accelerate a 44 ton artic to 55mph limiter cruising speed, on the level, i don't doubt it.

I'm no truck driver, but that sounds to me like a good leg-pull. I know a 44-tonner doesn't do many mpg, but £5-worth should get one a fair distance, especially at the price of red diesel ....

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - gordonbennet

Unfortunately i've spent a lot of years at the wheel, and over the last 10 to 15 years have had vehicles with OBC with instant readouts, seeing 3.9 mpg in top gear under power is sobering, more sobering still when you drop a couple of gears and its down to 2.5mpg, and when starting from rest you're down to anything from 0.5 to 1.5mpg.

With 10bhp per ton it can take you anything up to a mile to reach cruising speed, all the time has been under power, seeing those instant readouts has been very thought provoking, soon as you cut power and allow it to glide the reading goes off the scale cos thats all free, no fuel usage at all.

Bear in mind a modern 440hp lorry fully freighted at 44 ton will average about 9mpg if the vehicle is reasonably streamlined on good reasonably flat rmotorways, on two of our regular 1 hour from base deliveries where the many junctions lead to uphill climbs to regain speed, the vehicles will return anything from 4 to 6mpg including the empty return journey depending on driver and traffic...if you can keep the thing rolling it makes a massive difference.

I've done various experiment, again using the OBC which are accurate on lorries.

One of those local drops is a hilly A road route direct or a dual carriageway alternative some 70% longer by miles, i actually used almost 1 gallon less fuel on the outward loaded journey by going round.

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - Sofa Spud

I read somewhere it cost near enough £5 in fuel alone to accelerate a 44 ton artic to 55mph limiter cruising speed, on the level, i don't doubt it.

I'm no truck driver, but that sounds to me like a good leg-pull. I know a 44-tonner doesn't do many mpg, but £5-worth should get one a fair distance, especially at the price of red diesel ....

A top weight artic does about 7 or 8 mpg, less if it's accelerating hard. If it's down to 3 or 4 mpg when accelerating flat-out, fully loaded, and it takes a mile to reach 55 mph, then that looks more like something under £2.

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - gordonbennet
A top weight artic does about 7 or 8 mpg, less if it's accelerating hard. If it's down to 3 or 4 mpg when accelerating flat-out, fully loaded, and it takes a mile to reach 55 mph, then that looks more like something under £2.

Its down to 3.9mpg in top gear under power, progressively less as you go down through the gears, on not particularly steep hills its not unusual to see 2.5 mpg or if really steep less than 2mpg on the instant consumption readout.

Back at work next week, i'll try it and see if the OBC is accurate enough or allows a fuel actually used reading for the distance one 0 to 55 mph run...the average consumption doesn't register till you've covered a few miles, i'm hoping the actual fuel quantity used reading is more cooperative.

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - gordonbennet

Well i worked today and as promised i experimented with the OBC on my lorry.

It registers fuel used in increments of 0.5litres, and i performed three metered acceleration tests where i had to come to a halt anyway to see how much fuel would be used getting from stationary to 55mph, two were at 43 tons GVW, one at 42.200.

I did one test on a very slight downhill gradient, one starting on a slight downhill for about half the run and a similar angle uphill for the second half, and one run on a very slight uphill incline.

The amount of fuel used was 1.5litres for the easy run, 2.5litres for the down/up section, and 3.0litres for the uphill run, (how close they were to tripping another 0.5 litre usage i can't say) , so yes that £5 to get to 55mph is exagerrated, its cost at most just over 3 litres, incidentally the two heaviest runs lasted long enough to trigger the average fuel consumption reading (the downhill 1.5litre run was too fast to register mpg) both runs averaged 3.8 and 3.9mpg.

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - NARU

Great work. Very interesting.

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - daveyjp

"they put traffic lights on so everyone has to come to a stop for no reason then get moving again"

Road networks have to be designed for everyone and that includes those not using vehicles.

Ever tried crossing a really busy junction when the traffic lights aren't working? Imagine doing it with impaired vision.

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - Smileyman

For that there are underpasses and foot bridges

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - daveyjp
As I said you need to design for everyone. Can you see a flaw in your underpasses and footbridges 'solution'?
any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - galileo

It seems the larger cars get the smaller the space available. Many roads round here have had cycle lanes added...hardly see a bike on them...dual carriageways with a lane painted out and the odd bollard stuck in the middle. Many roads closed altogether so we all go the same way. Give way to oncoming traffic in the middle of nowhere have proliferated. What's your area like?

Been like that for years here, the local authority council and traffic department are, I think, entirely composed of cyclists, pedestrians and car-haters.

The local bus company runs almost empty vehicles, boasting that there is a bus every ten minutes on most routes, which of course is why all the roads are breaking up and potholed.

The biggest road resurfacing project in recent years was the route for the Tour de France.

Too old to emigrate or I'd be off!

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - argybargy

We have a dual carriageway not far off that takes us between the major local towns and which only gets seriously clogged up at teatime and holiday weekends in the summer.

The A55 has its problems, but being semi retired I tend to use it during the day and thus see the better of it. The view as you descend Rhuallt Hill is to die for...hills and mountains spread out across the horizon in a glorious vista.

There's a silly one way system in the town closest to where we live, and the road between us and that town is restricted to 50, winding as it does along a tree lined route which has a bank crowned with large trees rising on one side and a fairly steep slope down to a wooded area and stream on the other.

At night vehicles hurtle up that road at ludicrous speeds, so much so that they had to put barriers on the precipice side because a certain type of driver tends to lose his or her head completely when confronted with an open, more or less empty road in total darkness, and some occasionally failed to keep their jalopies on the track.

The same road becomes 30mph close to where we are, but the zebra crossing there is virtually impossible to use because of its proximity to a blind bend. More than once, when walking our old dog and making my way over the crossing I've had to scoop him up and run for the kerb because some goon with concrete for brains had come stonking round that blind corner towards us.

You rarely if ever see anyone on a bike around here. Just too dangerous.

Edited by argybargy on 28/09/2017 at 18:52

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - jamie745

I'll start with the positive; I love driving at night. Proper night. As in past midnight night. Skipping through deserted town centres which in less than six hours time will be depressing sclerotic farce. I don't understand people who don't like driving in the dark. I like a near deserted motorway at 2am. After midnight you can usually complete any journey from anywhere to anywhere without the vehicle coming to a complete stop at any point.

Aside from that it's a similar story to everywhere else. Too many horrid housing estates being built with no thought or care given to the impact on an already overstretched road network, most of these new rabbit hutches are being built without decent parking anyway as they'd rather cram in more people and hope they do what the Government says and take the bus instead - never gonna happen.

Too many people, too many houses, too many cars, not enough road to drive them on or places to park them anymore. But decades of zero investment and a backward point of view from Government and councils that there's no need to upgrade the roads, what's there will just have to do. A road which took 50 cars a day in 1970 will just have to cope with 2,000 now whether we like it or not.

I love the pathetic examples of bureucratic box-ticking in installing cycle lanes on roads which are the same width they always were. Putting a new bit of white paint down doesn't make the road any bigger! A junction near where I live was two lanes for decades - left lane for left turn only and right lane for everywhere else.

A couple of years ago they blacked out those lines, turned it into one lane and put a cycle lane in - thankfully the locals have completely ignored it and still sit two abreast at the junction blocking said cycle lane, as if it were still two lanes.

This is what happens when the state allows the population to rise at an astronomic rate that they couldn't have even planned for if they were competant enough to do so. Oh well, we've had politicians ramming it down our throats that it's good for us for decades so it'll take many years to fix it now.

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - argybargy

Driving at night...yes.

Driving a fire engine through the Mersey tunnel at 80mph during the early hours...that was stimulating. Driving it through deserted streets at breakneck speed on the way to a fire where someone was trapped...adrenalin overdose, BUT you had to keep your wits about you, because you were responsible for the lives, not only of your crew but the person(s) you were hurrying to rescue.

I miss that about the fire service, along with the camaraderie and the black humour. I drove to Manchester airport at 2 in the morning, to drop my daughter off for her holiday flight a couple of weeks ago, but the experience of a quiet motorway in the dark can't compare to burning rubber on the way to save life, and/or property.

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - Andrew-T

I'll start with the positive; I love driving at night. I don't understand people who don't like driving in the dark.

Jamie, most of us here know you are (relatively) young. When we were that age we probably liked night driving, and probably also enjoyed even less traffic. But older eyes suffer more from flare from oncoming headlights than young ones, so the pleasure tends to diminish.

I presume by 'the state allowing the population to expand' you mean by immigration, not 'natural increase' ?

Edited by Andrew-T on 01/10/2017 at 00:32

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - jamie745

I presume by 'the state allowing the population to expand' you mean by immigration, not 'natural increase' ?

Well absolutely. A quick googling shows the net migration figure for the past year to be around +246,000 - and that's relatively low compared to recent years.

246,000 is roughly the population of Plymouth. Think of it in terms of about 15 Plymouth's having arrived in the last 10-15 years and it doesn't take a genius to work out that's going to cause a problem as nobody has built another 10-15 Plymouth sized cities in that time to accomodate it.

Edited by jamie745 on 01/10/2017 at 21:49

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - gordonbennet

Those net figures are purely estimates, no ones actually counting people in or out, try looking up applications for National Insurance numbers, the real figure for nett i suspect is more like 1/2 a million every year, plus however many illegals) and has been increasing under the present socialist (though pretend otherwise) govt every year.

Not as it matters, people insist on voting for the same bunches of crooks yet keep expecting a different result.

If anyone think traffic is bad now, give it another 20 years and another 10 million +.

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - jamie745

I'm sure the real figure is much higher. Government knows exactly how many cows are in Britain but very little idea on how many people and that was my point.

Councils would still be on their anti-car bender even if the immigration numbers weren't bonkers, but the fact remains that people want cars and that's never going to stop, so rather than taxing them to death or trying to persuade them to give up working, how about we put that energy into making places for the damn cars to go.

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - Ryanfuego

The same problems in my area. Okay bikes need their space on the road but, mainly car drivers use road more than bike drivers. Government sees that problem but nobody cares, In my neighbourhood we have tried to contact local people from govermnemt but NO! Sometimes I stay in traffic for 45-55 minutes after work.

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - barney100

Add to the shrinking roads the number of new houses which means even more cars, the most arcane 'traffic calming' measures and ill thought out roundabout 'improvements', loads of potholes and that's Basingstoke.

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - macski

I live on a busy road, not an rated road but still busy. It meets up with an A road but for years it has had a 7.5 ton weight limit. Tucks need to make a detour of 10 miles to get to the other end of town, yet apart for it being a residential street there is no reason for it. People must have been aware of where they were buying their houses.

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - bolt

I live on a busy road, not an rated road but still busy. It meets up with an A road but for years it has had a 7.5 ton weight limit. Tucks need to make a detour of 10 miles to get to the other end of town, yet apart for it being a residential street there is no reason for it. People must have been aware of where they were buying their houses.

Some residents in some roads do not like HGVs driving past their houses, nor do councils like the roads destroyed and drains broken (bearing in mind they are not repaired properly now) some drain pipes underground are in a terrible state and could easily collapse under the weight of an artic

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - macski

If people do not like HGVs they shouldn't buy houses on A roads.


Maybe there is a reason for the ban, but such bans are costing a fortune in extra costs and environmentally also.

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - galileo

I live on a busy road, not an rated road but still busy. It meets up with an A road but for years it has had a 7.5 ton weight limit. Tucks need to make a detour of 10 miles to get to the other end of town, yet apart for it being a residential street there is no reason for it. People must have been aware of where they were buying their houses.

Some residents in some roads do not like HGVs driving past their houses, nor do councils like the roads destroyed and drains broken (bearing in mind they are not repaired properly now) some drain pipes underground are in a terrible state and could easily collapse under the weight of an artic

Local council allows three rival companies to run (almost empty) buses on the same route of residential roads at a frequency of 10 minutes (each way),i.e. 18 per hour in each direction.

I am sick of reporting potholes on this road, not to mention the sunken manholes and utility trenches which crack up under this treatment. HGV's would at least be serving a useful purpose , which unnecessarily frequent buses aren't.

any - Roads shrinking in Basingstoke - bolt

I live on a busy road, not an rated road but still busy. It meets up with an A road but for years it has had a 7.5 ton weight limit. Tucks need to make a detour of 10 miles to get to the other end of town, yet apart for it being a residential street there is no reason for it. People must have been aware of where they were buying their houses.

Some residents in some roads do not like HGVs driving past their houses, nor do councils like the roads destroyed and drains broken (bearing in mind they are not repaired properly now) some drain pipes underground are in a terrible state and could easily collapse under the weight of an artic

Local council allows three rival companies to run (almost empty) buses on the same route of residential roads at a frequency of 10 minutes (each way),i.e. 18 per hour in each direction.

I am sick of reporting potholes on this road, not to mention the sunken manholes and utility trenches which crack up under this treatment. HGV's would at least be serving a useful purpose , which unnecessarily frequent buses aren't.

I was told years ago by a council road repair chap, that the manhole covers were held up by engineering bricks which were a lot stronger than house bricks and lasted years without breaking up

they cut costs by using ordinary bricks instead, so they break up very quickly, and apparently the art of proper road repair was lost after councils contracted work out, which makes sense with the state of the roads as they are.

I have also noticed some roads that have been resurfaced are worse afterwards than they were before, for noise

 

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