All round visibility...... dire - Volvo - Fishermans Bend

At one time Volvo cars had excellent all round visibility, not now.

www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/volvo-xc40-ful...l

No wonder car manufacturers are falling over themselves to make cars that won't crash - that's because they are increasingly difficult to see out of.

All round visibility...... dire - Volvo - RobJP

Have you ever tried looking out of the back of an Evoque ? Especially the 3 door version ?

It's like looking out of a pillbox at the Normandy beaches.

All round visibility...... dire - Volvo - Engineer Andy

Tiny back windows seem to be a deliberate feature on most modern cars, presumably done to justify the inclusion of originally rear parking sensors and more recently TV camera systems, no doubt a very nice profit maker for the manufacturers.

All round visibility...... dire - Volvo - Avant

Sometimes the stylists claim it's in the name of safety, metal being stronger than glass. But they don't think of the extra risk from poor rear visibility of hitting a pedestrian, paticularly a child, when reversing.

I keep hoping that the original 'concept' drawings for the XC40 wouldn't see the light of day, and that it would look more ike the XC60, whose visibility seems to be fine. But these pictures suggest that the stupid stylist has prevailed.

So much for Volvo's boasts about safety. Not only that, they've also gone down the dangerous road of having the heating and AC controlled by touchscreen.

If all the above is true, I have a feeling that my current V60 wil be my first and last Volvo.

All round visibility...... dire - Volvo - argybargy

I've had a couple of cars with pretty awful visibility.

The Meriva had a huge A pillar that seriously obscured vision at roundabouts (so much the worse because you could never rely on the Easytronic to find the best gear when there was a gap in the traffic ) and my current car isn't much better when it comes to lateral vision during reversing in car parks, despite the total lack of a B pillar.

Visibility wise cars seem to be going backwards, not advancing.

All round visibility...... dire - Volvo - Mike H

That's certainly the case with our 2015 CRV. The reversing camera is OK, but I'd rather be able to see properly with my own eyes. The heavy rear three quarter metal makes it very difficult when reversing. The worst design feature of an otherwise great vehicle.

All round visibility...... dire - Volvo - badbusdriver

funny really, how, in the interests of style and design, the responsibility of safety is being removed from the driver and placed instead with all the electronic systems. Why does the driver need to see where he/she is going when the car will brake itself, or warn the driver through a buzzer if there is danger of having an accident?!.

This is something which is getting steadily worse, though it is hardly a new problem. Everyones favourite family hatchback, the golf, used to always be criticised over the blind spot caused by the depth of the C pillars. A problem which you did not get with the maestro, which was like sitting in a fish bowl, however the maestro has long since bitten the dust while the golf goes on as usual getting smugger and smugger. Motoring press meanwhile, have totally given up on offering any sort of criticism about the golf, instead ramming down our throats that it is point blank the best car in it's class.

But the new breed of SUV/coupe is by far the worst offender with their combination of ride height, depth of flanks and shallow windows means that without the brace of sensors and radars you get, it really would not be safe to drive one.

This ties in neatly with an aspect of car safety which is by and large, completely ignored these days. That is passive safety, or the ability to avoid an accident in the 1st place. In order for a car to have a high level of passive safety, it needs to have good visibility (so you have as good a chance as possible of spotting any potential hazard), it needs to be agile, and therefore light in weight (so it will react quickly to a sudden change of direction), and it needs to be no bigger than absolutely necessary (for example, you come upon a partialy blocked road, there is not enough space to stop, but there is a small gap). Of course, this does rely on the driver being alert and sharp enough to act quickly and decisively in such a situation..........

Never mind, once driverless cars are the norm, we wont have to worry at all about seeing where we are going or having accidents!.

Going back to volvo, i remember years ago reading about a new innovation developed by volvo to alleviate the blind spot caused by thick A pillars. By making them 'see through'!. This was done by having a latticework frame of metal and the gaps filled in with clear polycarbonate or some such thing. The article i read praised how effective it was, but nothing ever came of it, i wonder why?

All round visibility...... dire - Volvo - Vitesse6

The late and much missed Douglas Adams came up with the idea of peril sensitive glasses which were able to sense impending trouble and turn themselves opaque so that the wearer wouldn't be scared by seeing the approaching peril. Maybe this is the thinking behind the awful visibility, if you can't see the tree you are about to hit then you won't be worried about it.

All round visibility...... dire - Volvo - corax

A problem which you did not get with the maestro, which was like sitting in a fish bowl, however the maestro has long since bitten the dust while the golf goes on as usual getting smugger and smugger. Motoring press meanwhile, have totally given up on offering any sort of criticism about the golf, instead ramming down our throats that it is point blank the best car in it's class.

BL had a lot of drawbacks that have been discussed on here countless times, but their cabin design was really good - spacious, comfortable and great visibility.

All round visibility...... dire - Volvo - badbusdriver

A problem which you did not get with the maestro, which was like sitting in a fish bowl, however the maestro has long since bitten the dust while the golf goes on as usual getting smugger and smugger. Motoring press meanwhile, have totally given up on offering any sort of criticism about the golf, instead ramming down our throats that it is point blank the best car in it's class.

BL had a lot of drawbacks that have been discussed on here countless times, but their cabin design was really good - spacious, comfortable and great visibility.

My brother has owned a couple of maestros and at least one montego, the last of which was probably 10 years ago. And while he has owned quite a lot of cars before and since (he does tend to change them on a regular basis), one of the maestros, a blue diesel, is in his own opinion, his favourite of all the cars that he has ever owned.

I don't have much experience of them myself, but I do remember my uncle having one in the late 80's, and while he loved the space, practically and all round visibility, the rattles from the dashboard drove him mad (not literally I must point out!).

Going back to the visibility issue, something else I remember from years ago, was that in at least one of the motoring magazines, along with the usual road test data, there was also a diagram. This was a view of the car from above and showed how much all round vision was available from the drivers seat. The blind spots were shaded in radiating outwards from the pillars so it could be clearly determined just how big they were. A very useful guide to the visibility, one which, as far as I am aware, is no longer used. I'm not sure why something so useful would not still be in use, but the cynic in me wonders if the manufacturers won't supply the information because they don't want people to realise just how bad the problem has become?.

 

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