Professional driving - Driving - crapcar

Can a specialists from hospital advise you not to drive as a professional but tell you that you can still drive for social and domestic and pleasure

Edited by crapcar on 13/09/2017 at 18:46

Professional driving - Driving - RobJP

I'll put it like this. Plenty of medical conditions would prevent you from (for example) passing a HGV medical, but still allow you to have a 'normal' car licence.

Some detail on the medical situation might be helpful.

Edited by RobJP on 13/09/2017 at 19:19

Professional driving - Driving - crapcar

muscle wastage since previous spinal operations in in right leg limited movement and power and lack of feeling now having to wear a brace surgeon Fields that the leg will only deteriorate more

Professional driving - Driving - FP

I think that answers the question.

A professional driver will be driving more than a private individual driving for "social, domestic and pleasure", and will carry more responsibility for others' welfare (if, for example, driving HGVs or PSVs).

If you are in effect partially disabled your surgeon's advice makes sense. Rob may know, but I don't, about what the medical conditions are that relate to HGVs and PSVs. Does taxi-driving come into this somewhere, or are there no restrictions?

By the way, very sorry to hear of your difficulties.

Edited by FP on 13/09/2017 at 19:49

Professional driving - Driving - crapcar

That's life and thank you for your time replying

Professional driving - Driving - RobJP

Unfortunately, as FP says.

Obviously your financial position will dictate if it's feasible, but I know of a lady who suffers with a similar condition. By getting a decent sports massage - which really works the muscles quite deeply - every 3 or 4 weeks, along with some good exercise regimes, she's managed to virtually stop the loss of muscle mass.

She found the NHS physio sessions to be next to useless. She was given 6 months to her first appointment, and then told the appointments would be every 2-3 months after that. So she ended up getting the sports massage done privately.

Good luck.

Professional driving - Driving - TedCrilly

I think you need to be putting the question to the DVLA and your insurance company.

Professional driving - Driving - crapcar

Was told that I would never work again in 2000 so I have had a good run just got to find out how to and what I am entailed to re benefits ect never have before very scarey

Professional driving - Driving - RobJP

Your local council should have people who can advise you, and specialise in such advice.

Failing which, CAB.

Professional driving - Driving - Bromptonaut

Your local council should have people who can advise you, and specialise in such advice.

Failing which, CAB.

I'd say go straight to Citizens Advice (but as I am an employee of the organisation you'd expect me to suggest that!!) Website is www.citizensadvice.org.uk/

Not advice but some pointers if unable to work would be:

Employment and Support Allowance

Personal Independence Payment

Housing Benefit (if you're renting)

Council Tax Reduction.

www.turn2us.org.uk/ and www.entitledto.co.uk/ are two good sites for a DIY benefit prediction.

Professional driving - Driving - nick62

Unfortunately, as FP says.

Obviously your financial position will dictate if it's feasible, but I know of a lady who suffers with a similar condition. By getting a decent sports massage - which really works the muscles quite deeply - every 3 or 4 weeks, along with some good exercise regimes, she's managed to virtually stop the loss of muscle mass.

She found the NHS physio sessions to be next to useless. She was given 6 months to her first appointment, and then told the appointments would be every 2-3 months after that. So she ended up getting the sports massage done privately.

Good luck.

Sorry to hear about the OP's condition, I hope you get sorted-out and wish you well in the future.

Regarding the above statement about physiotherapy via the NHS, I have to say I completely agree given my limited experience using this service, (and this was during the supposedly "good" period about 10 years ago). Not a particularly long wait to start treatment, but first 20 minute appointment was just answering questions, no treatment possible in time allowed. Following appointments always started at least 5 minutes late and usually 10, but always ended at time allocated. What a complete waste of resource and my time!.

Private is a completely different kettle of fish, but expensive if you are on a budget.

Professional driving - Driving - Theophilus

The DVLA “Assessing fitness to drive for medical practitioners” states that for “any chronic neurological disorder that may affect vehicle control because of impaired coordination and muscle strength” there is a requirement to notify the DVLA.

For Group 2 (PSV & HGV) licenses the advice states “May drive as long as safe vehicle control is maintained at all times. A licence will be refused or revoked if the individual’s condition is progressive or disabling” (My italics). “If driving is not impaired and the underlying condition is stable, licensing will be considered on an individual basis subject to satisfactory medical reports and annual review.”

The advice for car driving is less rigorous, though you still must notify the DVLA. "A licence valid for 1, 2, 3 or 5 years may be issued provided medical enquiries by the DVLA confirm that driving performance is not impaired"

Professional driving - Driving - concrete

What a sad situation to find yourself in. I hope you can find suitable treatment to aleviate the problem to some extent. Good advice form Bromtonaut about the benefits. I dont know your circumstances, but a change to an automatic car may help. Best of luck.

Cheers Concrete

 

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