New car dilemma - smaxowner

First post on this forum. I am currently considering changing my car, and I am in the fortunate position of having around £30K to spend, but wish to buy 2nd hand, as I have no interest in paying vast amounts of depreciation on a brand new vehicle. The cars I am considering are Mercedes CLS Shooting Brake and the Audi A7/S7 and I might consider the BMW 5 Series Touring. I want something that is good looking, luxurious and has a reasonable degree of practicality about it, hence these cars are at the top of my list. I also need to be able to tow a trailier sometimes. The issue is that both the Merc and the BMW are only available in diesel (the BMW is theoretically available in petrol, but try finding one and the CLS63 AMG is excluded because it is not approved for towing), and I don't do a high mileage, around 100 miles a week to work, hence I am concerned about the dreaded DPF issue and MPG is not really an issue. Also, with disels now becoming less PC, future taxes are a possibility, so I would only consider an EU6 compliant car. Do I simply avoid all the worry about diesel and bite the bullet and buy the Audi which is available in petrol V6/V8 ? Trouble is, I like the look of the Merc a lot! I'd also be interested to hear any alternatives proposed. I'd also be interested to hear of ownership expereince of the Audi A7/S7.

New car dilemma - SLO76
You have a good healthy budget so the world is your oyster. Take decent test drives in all three and see how they feel to you and rule out anything that doesn't work for you. Some complain of the overly firm ride in the A7 which would deter me and VAG aren't the best when it comes to automatic gearboxes of any kind over the longterm so I'd be more wary of it if you intend on keeping it past it's 5th birthday.

While I'd normally steer such a low mileage user away from diesel the truth is it's still your only realistic option at this end of the market. Despite the swing to petrol in small to medium classes the larger luxury cars and SUV's simply suit the lugging power of a big diesel and anything you'd save in risk reduction and initial purchase price will be more than lost come resale.

Buy the one you like driving the most (I'd suggest a shot of a Jag XF too) and only buy an approved used car from a main dealer with a full main dealer history and again only but if you can afford to and intend on continuing to service it there. If you can't or can't bring yourself to pay for dealer servicing then don't buy one. No one else knows how to maintain complex metal like this.

Of the three you've listed I'd have a BM 5 series Touring but sadly all of the 6cyl diesel estates on Autotrader between £25k & £30k are lumbered with the firm M sport suspension (too hard for my taste) and daft wide wheels. But If that's your thing then they're great big cars. Just price in the impact the new model will have on residuals. Later cars will drop much harder now.

Edited by SLO76 on 07/09/2017 at 22:27

New car dilemma - smaxowner

Thanks for your advice. I agree with your overall observation: diesel is king within the market at this point. From what i've read elsewhere, I probably shouldn't worry too much about the DPF issue as it is something that tends to become a problem much later in life when I would probably have changed the car anyway. That isn't guaranteed of course, but the savings in fuel cost between diesel and petrol would help to offset any repair cost from DPF issues. Interesting point on the Audi, I don't particularly appreciate a firm ride and the other point that makes me a little nervous of Audi is that their reputation for reliability isn't exactly brilliant. The BMW does look lovely, but I agree with you on the M sport suspension which might put me off! I'll certainly look at the Jaguar so thanks for that suggestion. The Merc CLS I am tempted with (although only the 350d V6 not the smaller 220d) as I currently have an E class, and it has been a very good car, and i've had very good experience with Mercedes for customer service. Absolutely correct that for these cars, only main dealers should service them.

New car dilemma - RobJP

You can get the 530d / 535d in 'Luxury' trim, rather than 'MSport'. loses the hard suspension, normally come with 18" (MSport usually 19") wheels.

I was within a whisker of swapping my 325d touring for a 2016 530d Lux touring earlier this year.

New car dilemma - daveyjp
Jaguar XF?

Good luck searching on their website though as it is completely bleep, bleep, bleep useless!,

Edited by daveyjp on 07/09/2017 at 22:27

New car dilemma - RobJP

I know someone who has an S7 and they absolutely love it. Came from a Range rover.

She reckons it does a bit over 30mpg on a motorway run. More like 20mpg urban though !

New car dilemma - smaxowner

That's interesting, thanks. In terms of the mpg, for the size of engine and performance on offer, that's pretty good. My current E class petrol only gives around 25 urban and about 33 on the motorway, and that is for an engine half the size!

New car dilemma - nellyjak

Jeeeez.!....good luck with that, fella...I can't imagine having £30k to spend on a car.!...or tbh, wanting to spend £30k on a car.

I'm way too "old skool" (or old git) I guess..even £10k seems a helluva to me to spend on summat that only reduces in value very quickly. (unless you are delving into the classic market).

Even if I were a lottery winner (or Bonds in my case) I think I'd stuggle to find a car that really ticked enough boxes..irrelevant of price.

I think only a nice motorhome would persuade me enough to part with that sort of cash.

The only possible exception I can think of right now is the Lexus RC...clearly not what YOU are looking for...lol

New car dilemma - argybargy

Absolutely no help to you whatsoever, but having myself bought a small car recently I have to confess to loving really big cars. However, I long ago realised, after a brief flirtation with a dodgy example of the Rover 820, that I'll never own one ever again. Even if I could afford to buy a great big bus, I couldn't afford to run it, if that makes sense.

I agree that 30k seems a huge sum of money to spend on anything short of a deposit on a house, but if you've got it, why not flaunt it, and this is the place to find out how best to make that money work.

Meanwhile I'll consider myself to be doing well if next time round I can scrape enough together using a bit of cash, a credit card and a part ex to buy one of the cars which were recommended to me recently for around the eight grand mark, but which I ignored in favour of something else.

Edited by argybargy on 08/09/2017 at 10:42

New car dilemma - Terry W

A nice dilemma to have but really just a self indulgence. I would defend the right of anyone to spend their money as they see fit, but objectively it is just a waste of money.

You seem to have no particular essential needs that must be met - just a low annual mileage, occassional trailer (how large).

A top of the range Ford Focus (or similar) would probably provide all the functionality and gizmos you may reasonably want. It will be more economical, easier to park and less sressful when it picks up the odd ding.

Just as an aside - 30 years ago I worked extensively in France. The routine was fly then rent a small hatch for local miles for a few days. At the time there was a large difference in the way they performed - small Peugeot, Renault, Fiat, Rover Vauxhall etc. But in the £30k+ bracket they will all be good cars - the differentiator being perceptions, self image and trivia.

New car dilemma - nellyjak

Yep...certainly not knocking the OP...if that's what you wanna do then fine...it's his money and he should buy what the Hell he likes with it...and b***** good luck to him.

I'm a lover of big cars too...certainly big engines anyway. Always been a massive fan of the Lexus LS400...in the past had a 4.3 litre Chevy for ten years....a Rover P5b and now got a 3.0 litre V6 Toyota.

Generally, I don't buy cars under 2 litres..I think I might be addicted to cc's.

New car dilemma - Avant

I wouldn't agree with Terry W: if you enjoy driving, there's a very special feeling about having a really good car. For me at least, part of that feeling comes from having more than four cylinders under the bonnet.

I'm not sure about the A7 and S7, but some Audis are available with standard, rather than sports, suspension as a no-cost option. Worth investigating, although if you're buying used, you'd have to find out whether that box had been ticked by the first owner.

I agree with the suggestion above to add the XF Sportbrake to the shortlist: also a Lexus hybrid might be worth a look. This one is dependent on your driving style: if you enjoy a good burst of acceleration form time to time, as I do, a hybrid isn't for you, but it does suit a more leisurely driver.

If it were me, the choice would be between an A7 (or maybe a Q5) and a BMW 540i Touring.

New car dilemma - RT

I... a Lexus hybrid might be worth a look. This one is dependent on your driving style: if you enjoy a good burst of acceleration form time to time, as I do, a hybrid isn't for you, but it does suit a more leisurely driver.

I thought that was one of the reasons for using a hybrid - the total power being higher than the engine on it's own.

New car dilemma - SLO76
"I thought that was one of the reasons for using a hybrid - the total power being higher than the engine on it's own."

It is but they all come with a CVT gearbox that is unsuited to spirited driving. It sends revs screaming to maximum when you plant your foot and there they'll stay until the cars speed catches up. It's efficient and quick but refinement suffers.
New car dilemma - RT
"I thought that was one of the reasons for using a hybrid - the total power being higher than the engine on it's own." It is but they all come with a CVT gearbox that is unsuited to spirited driving. It sends revs screaming to maximum when you plant your foot and there they'll stay until the cars speed catches up. It's efficient and quick but refinement suffers.

I thought CVTs had moved on from the DAF days - use of electronic "fixed" stepped gear ratios to start with.

Any autobox will change down when you floor the accelerator, to get the engine up into it's power band. My Touareg stays in the 1,200-1,800 rpm band when driven "normally" but when it's floored drops how ever many gears to get into the 4,000+ power band - my Subaru was the same, except that it's power band was higher (much higher!)

New car dilemma - Bianconeri
"I thought that was one of the reasons for using a hybrid - the total power being higher than the engine on it's own." It is but they all come with a CVT gearbox that is unsuited to spirited driving. It sends revs screaming to maximum when you plant your foot and there they'll stay until the cars speed catches up. It's efficient and quick but refinement suffers.

Kia and Hyundai use DCT boxes in hybrids not CVT and are very good. With both engines running you get excellent acceleration if you need it, just floor the throttle. I'm delighted with mine, 60mpg in normal running and really well put together.
New car dilemma - pinkpanther_75

Petrol Audi A7 for me! Lovely looking car and infinitely more road presence than the BMW / Mercedes alternates.

I have to agree regarding the CVT engined Lexus hybrids. I've driven both the CT200 / IS300h and found them both to be a frustrating / uninvolving experience. The GS450h is quite entertaining though!

New car dilemma - SteveLee

Step away from the crowd - Volvo V60 3.0 T6 Polestar Estate AWD.

Real shame they don't do Jaguar XF shootbrakes with large petrol engines. If you could wait a year, the fpace with the supercharged v6 should come into your price range, may look like an SUV but it handle like a sports saloon.

 

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