Golf - Tempted by Diesel - scot22

I am firmly resolved never to buy another diesel. However, there are a number of diesel Golfs coming on the market which seem good value buys - few petrols.

I know about emissions issue but are their diesel engines horrendous money pits etc. Was I just unfortunate with C30 1.6 diesel ? I average around 10,000 miles a year and do get the engine to a good temperature very often. Just because I have had a bad experience don't want to miss out on possibly good buys. Or is it better to wait ?

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - SLO76
The engine is fundamentally sound (unlike the PSA unit in your Volvo) but post 'fix' seems to suffer all too often from EGR issues and they're also prone to clogged DPF's if you're doing a lot of short runs. Speaking to taxi owners (some with 1.6 Rapids, Octavias and Passats with 250k upwards) and the mechanics at my usual garage (who prep any sales cars for me and is popular with the taxi trade) they have noticed a marked difference with regard to these issues between cars which avoid supermarket fuel and those who use it all the time.

If you can buy a post 2015 car they should be ok or if you can find an earlier one that hasn't had the update carried out then also it'll likely be fine. I've a 2012 polo 1.2 diesel I use to commute in which is essentially the same engine minus a cylinder and in 60,000 miles it's never put a foot wrong. Touch wood!

However with a sub 10k annual mileage I would be going for petrol, mine is over 15k. Which make and model depends largely on your budget and needs which with my rubbish memory I can't recall.

Edited by SLO76 on 15/08/2017 at 00:05

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - Avant

What's your budget, Scot? The best Golf to go for is the petrol 1.4 TSI, but if these are too expensive, a similarly engined SEAT Leon will be cheaper, as will a Skoda Octavia.

Few people want a VW diesel at the moment, so the cost is low: but if you're buying used, the cost of repairs will probably cancel out any savings in purhase price or in fuel. The one exception I'd make is that the old 1.9TDI engine was a good'un - but cars with this engine are all fairly old now. Someone in the know will be able to tell us when the 1.9 was phased out.

If you're looking for a Golf-size car, there are lots of Japanese and Korean petrol-powered cars to choose from, and don't forget the Ford Focus as there are even more of these around (avoid the 1.0 Ecoboost).

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - scot22

Many thanks for the helpful replies. Should have realised cheaper for a reason. Looking to spend on region of 8 to 10000 pounds.

Will be consistent with petrool. Probably a Venga or ix20 most suitable. Have to realise never going to find perfection. If Golf will be 1.4 petrol tsi.

Before going to sleep I will repeat 10 times must not over think.

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - oldroverboy.

Many thanks for the helpful replies. Should have realised cheaper for a reason. Looking to spend on region of 8 to 10000 pounds.

Will be consistent with petrool. Probably a Venga or ix20 most suitable. Have to realise never going to find perfection. If Golf will be 1.4 petrol tsi.

Before going to sleep I will repeat 10 times must not over think.

I got a 2 seater sofa in the back of the venga with the seats flat and the passenger seat forward, and my driving seat a bit forward. I now do 7-8000 miles a year with an overall average of about 35. but get up tp low 40's on a run. utterly reliable and £10.000 will get you a nearly new one.

www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/20170624675...1

AND balance of 7 year warranty

Edited by oldroverboy. on 15/08/2017 at 08:20

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - SLO76
The Kia and Hyundai are good longlived little cars but depreciation is very heavy. Their slightly ungainly styling doesn't appeal to all so they are hard work to sell on. Aside from some reports of water leaks into the cabin, particularly the boot It's unlikely to ever give any trouble and both come with excellent warranties if you buy one with a full dealer history.

If you want to go this small though the latest Honda Jazz is a worthy contender which is cheaper to run and will hold its value much better. All three are a world away from a torquey turbo diesel or TSi petrol Golf/Leon/Octavia on a motorway or B road however and are better suited to local driving so take time to test drive a few before committing.

Edited by SLO76 on 15/08/2017 at 09:44

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - RT
The Kia and Hyundai are good longlived little cars but depreciation is very heavy. Their slightly ungainly styling doesn't appeal to all so they are hard work to sell on.

That wasn't my experience - sold my Santa Fe at 5 years old to WBAC for 50% of what I'd paid brand new - probably could have got more privately and it seemed to sell on quickly judging by the MoT history website.

How many other cars will give 50% at 3 years old, let alone 5.

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - Engineer Andy
The Kia and Hyundai are good longlived little cars but depreciation is very heavy. Their slightly ungainly styling doesn't appeal to all so they are hard work to sell on.

That wasn't my experience - sold my Santa Fe at 5 years old to WBAC for 50% of what I'd paid brand new - probably could have got more privately and it seemed to sell on quickly judging by the MoT history website.

How many other cars will give 50% at 3 years old, let alone 5.

50% of the price when paid new is not the same as 50% of list price. I mean, who ever just pays list price other than for premium luxury and sports cars?

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - RT
The Kia and Hyundai are good longlived little cars but depreciation is very heavy. Their slightly ungainly styling doesn't appeal to all so they are hard work to sell on.

That wasn't my experience - sold my Santa Fe at 5 years old to WBAC for 50% of what I'd paid brand new - probably could have got more privately and it seemed to sell on quickly judging by the MoT history website.

How many other cars will give 50% at 3 years old, let alone 5.

50% of the price when paid new is not the same as 50% of list price. I mean, who ever just pays list price other than for premium luxury and sports cars?

I'll re-phrase the question - how many cars will give 50% of list price at 3 years old, let alone 5?

Excess demand ensure that discount was zero as I had to wait for a factory order from Korea - no unsold stock in the UK.

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - SLO76
"That wasn't my experience - sold my Santa Fe at 5 years old to WBAC for 50% of what I'd paid brand new - probably could have got more privately and it seemed to sell on quickly judging by the MoT history website.

How many other cars will give 50% at 3 years old, let alone 5."

Who mentioned a Santa Fe? I was talking of the rather awkward looking but still very good Venga or ix20.

Edited by SLO76 on 15/08/2017 at 11:06

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - RT
"That wasn't my experience - sold my Santa Fe at 5 years old to WBAC for 50% of what I'd paid brand new - probably could have got more privately and it seemed to sell on quickly judging by the MoT history website. How many other cars will give 50% at 3 years old, let alone 5." Who mentioned a Santa Fe? I was talking of the rather awkward looking but still very good Venga or ix20.

You seemed to be generalising on the Kia and Hyundai brands.

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - SLO76
"You seemed to be generalising on the Kia and Hyundai brands."

You've misunderstood me. I was only discussing the two vehicles in question not the brands, both of which I frequently recommend and would happily do so with the current Santa Fe which is a good looking and well made big family bus.
Golf - Tempted by Diesel - TheGentlemanThug

I am firmly resolved never to buy another diesel. However, there are a number of diesel Golfs coming on the market which seem good value buys - few petrols.

I know about emissions issue but are their diesel engines horrendous money pits etc. Was I just unfortunate with C30 1.6 diesel ? I average around 10,000 miles a year and do get the engine to a good temperature very often. Just because I have had a bad experience don't want to miss out on possibly good buys. Or is it better to wait ?

I had the same engine in a 2008 Focus and it was perfectly adequate, although I appreciate that I may be an outliner. I wouldn't buy one today though.

The Venga and ix20 are fine cars, as is the Jazz that SLO suggested. I'd recommend the latter over the formers if it suits you.

Edited by Bicycle_Repair_Man on 15/08/2017 at 11:43

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - Ethan Edwards

If you buy a VW that has had the emissions fix done. What is to stop you taking the car to a tuner and having an after market remap?

Cheap car -cheap remap -great vehicle.

Since you' ve already bought used if the VW warranty isn't important to you and provided it passes the mot emissions check. Which it really should then...

Struggling to see the downside here.

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - Engineer Andy

If you buy a VW that has had the emissions fix done. What is to stop you taking the car to a tuner and having an after market remap?

Cheap car -cheap remap -great vehicle.

Since you' ve already bought used if the VW warranty isn't important to you and provided it passes the mot emissions check. Which it really should then...

Struggling to see the downside here.

Why buy a diesel you know very little about (especially its history, including how it was driven) other than what the vendor tells you, which could mean the car is gummed up with soot and about to need a major fix (and I don't mean the emissions fix) at the main dealer, costing a fortune...especially when a petrol engined car is eminently more suitable for a 10k miles a year usage, and, as long as you stay away from certain makes/engines/gearboxes, should prove reliable, especially if its from a main dealer or has a proven service history (it matters less as to how it was driven than if it were a diesel).

To me, second-hand modern diesels are a lottery if you're not doing well over 20k miles a year or at least one 25 mile trip a week along fast-flowing roads AND you know how it was driven previously. Even for low-mileage use but which is sporadic and over longer distances, the extra mpg over petrol-engined alternatives is meaningless, given diesel cars cost more to buy for the same performance and more to service, even when they're running fine. Its the reason why so many people ARE having problems after having the emissions fix, its just the fix has brought those problems forward a year or so.

Of course, depending upon which diesel car was chosen and the decisions of politicians, your newly paid-for second-hand car may not be welcome in many towns in cities in just a few years time - this is very important for those who think they can 'get around' the 'unreliable diesel' issue by buying a car whose engine was a previous generation one that isn't affected by dieselgate.

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - scot22

Thanks for all the additional posts. The message I have received from a number of previous posts is that I would be better off steeering clear of diesels. I respect the opinions of those who have told me that and I will now stick to petrol. Just a little weary of not finding a car I like sufficiently to buy. Problem is I've been spoilt by the C30 cabin and drive.

Unfortunately for me cars keep on getting bigger. I would love something very similar size and comfort to C30 but not able to find many available. As I freely admit my wishlist is probably way too long - though I've yet to hear of anyone who prefers the EPB to the traditional handbrake.

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - RT

Unfortunately for me cars keep on getting bigger. I would love something very similar size and comfort to C30 but not able to find many available. As I freely admit my wishlist is probably way too long - though I've yet to hear of anyone who prefers the EPB to the traditional handbrake.

That's how manufacturers justify ever-higher prices - if you ever see a mk1 Ford Cortina, you'll realise just how tiny it is by modern standards - somewhere between a Ka and a Fiesta - despite the Cortina evolving through 4 mks, the Sierra and 4 generations of Mondeo, each one bigger than the previous.

If your needs don't grow over time, just downsize.

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - SLO76

Thanks for all the additional posts. The message I have received from a number of previous posts is that I would be better off steeering clear of diesels. I respect the opinions of those who have told me that and I will now stick to petrol. Just a little weary of not finding a car I like sufficiently to buy. Problem is I've been spoilt by the C30 cabin and drive.

Unfortunately for me cars keep on getting bigger. I would love something very similar size and comfort to C30 but not able to find many available. As I freely admit my wishlist is probably way too long - though I've yet to hear of anyone who prefers the EPB to the traditional handbrake.

Auto Trader: www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/20170812827...8
Golf - Tempted by Diesel - scot22

Thanks Both. SLO76 I appreciate the link. SEAT Leon now on short list.

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - scot22

Thanks Both. SLO76 I appreciate the link. SEAT Leon now on short list.

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - pd

Thanks for all the additional posts. The message I have received from a number of previous posts is that I would be better off steeering clear of diesels. I respect the opinions of those who have told me that and I will now stick to petrol. Just a little weary of not finding a car I like sufficiently to buy. Problem is I've been spoilt by the C30 cabin and drive.

Unfortunately for me cars keep on getting bigger. I would love something very similar size and comfort to C30 but not able to find many available. As I freely admit my wishlist is probably way too long - though I've yet to hear of anyone who prefers the EPB to the traditional handbrake.

If you liked the C30, look at the V40. Same basic car underneath and still has the Volvo seats. Should be plenty of petrols about.

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - Smileyman

Have seen advertised some brand new (17 or 67 plate) Seat Toledo petrol cars, for £11,995. I know it's a touch over your budget, but then again you would be buying brand new, saving perhaps 40% list price straight off. for For 10,000 miles a year should be ideal, and almost as cheap as diesel to run too. Built in the same factory as the Skoda Rapid, so it's almost a VW car, has many of the most useful toys and a bigger boot than the Golf too!

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - jamie745

My S-Type has the electric parking brake and you get used to it I think, but it's an automatic and nobody who drives an automatic ever applies the handbrake anyway.

I'd say steer clear of diesel generally. It's horrible stuff, sounds awful and it seems to me as though diesels have become extremely complex to meet unrealistic emissions regulations that they're now fundamentally unreliable.

Diesel was never meant to be used in everyday passenger cars. It's not made for it. Diesel belongs in lorries, tractors and vans.

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - expat

it's an automatic and nobody who drives an automatic ever applies the handbrake anyway.

That is news to me. I have been driving autos for thirty years and so has my wife. We always use the handbrake when parking as do both of my sons who have autos also.

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - RT

it's an automatic and nobody who drives an automatic ever applies the handbrake anyway.

That is news to me. I have been driving autos for thirty years and so has my wife. We always use the handbrake when parking as do both of my sons who have autos also.

When I first had an automatic, I was told that by an MoT tester - but I've always applied the handbrake despite putting it in park.

What people don't do, manual or automatic, is to "clean" their handbrake shoes/drum by occasionally driving a short distance with the handbrake partially applied - it's only needed where the handbrake uses a separate drum to the rear disks, but very necessary in that case.

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - pd

Although you should use the park brake on an Auto (if nothing else to stop the strain on the locking park pin) a lot of drivers do not.

The S-Type applies it anyway when you taek the key out btw.

Golf - Tempted by Diesel - jamie745

The S-Type applies it anyway when you taek the key out btw.

Yes that was my point, that you get used to it because it's just....there. You don't have to do anything.

I've never met anybody who even knows where the handbrake is in an automatic, my mother has a Mercedes with their annoying foot parking brake and whenever she gets it back from the garage she ends up trying to drive away with the handbrake on - then struggles to remember how to take it off!

 

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