The cost of servicing - 1964 - Fishermans Bend

Going through some old family paperwork the older generation found a receipt for the cost of servicing a Morris Traveller in 1964. Service carried out at village garage - 10,000 miles - 14 shillings and 6 d. For those who've only lived in decimal times that equates to, I'm told, 72.5 pence. The 9,000 mile service was the same price!

2 gallons of Fina petrol - 8 shillings and 10 d. The equivalent of about 44 pence, 22 pence a gallon just to clarify.

Edited by Fishermans Bend on 16/07/2017 at 21:28

The cost of servicing - 1964 - RT

Going through some old family paperwork the older generation found a receipt for the cost of servicing a Morris Traveller in 1964. Service carried out at village garage - 10,000 miles - 14 shillings and 6 d. For those who've only lived in decimal times that equates to, I'm told, 72.5 pence. The 9,000 mile service was the same price!

2 gallons of Fina petrol - 8 shillings and 10 d. The equivalent of about 44 pence, 22 pence a gallon just to clarify.

5 pence a litre for those unfamiliar with gallons

Back in '66, apprentice wage rate was 2/- per hour - that's 10p/hour or £3.75 /week

The cost of servicing - 1964 - Avant

I started driving in 1966 and yes, I can remember prices like that. Another factor keeping cost down was that a Morris Traveller could be serviced anywhere. It only had a one-year warranty from new, but that wasn't invalidated if you didn't go to a BMC dealer.

Morris Minors were much better built than BMC's newer designs like the Mini and 1100. The later ones with the 1100 engine were quite sprightly off the mark, and the gearchange was far superior. Not having the gearbox sharing the engine oil must have been an advantage.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - RT

I started driving in 1966 and yes, I can remember prices like that. Another factor keeping cost down was that a Morris Traveller could be serviced anywhere. It only had a one-year warranty from new, but that wasn't invalidated if you didn't go to a BMC dealer.

Morris Minors were much better built than BMC's newer designs like the Mini and 1100. The later ones with the 1100 engine were quite sprightly off the mark, and the gearchange was far superior. Not having the gearbox sharing the engine oil must have been an advantage.

i've always thought that if engineers designed a machine to destroy the lubricating quality of engine oil - it would look like the BMC transmission.

The 1100/1300 models were conceptually brilliant - but lacked pre-production development as well as on-going development - like so many BMC/Austin/Rover models a complete let-down in execution.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - bathtub tom

lacked pre-production development as well as on-going development - like so many BMC/Austin/Rover models a complete let-down in execution.

They did the job they were designed to at time, didn't they?

The cost of servicing - 1964 - Stanb Sevento

They did the job they were designed to at time, didn't they?

Yes they did the job but not for very long. I just about cut my teeth on old A series engines, had a dozen of them at least, everything from 850 Minies to a MG 1300. They needed constant maintenance to keep them from disintigrating, valve stem and just about every other oil seal needed replaced every weekend or at least thats what it felt like. Suspension and steering joints, trailing arm bushes, CV joints all rubbish but cheap as chips. It was a love / hate relationship.

I tuned Mini engines just as a hobby, reshaped the combustion chambers, gas flowed the ports and skimed the cylinder heads and richer needle in the SU carb. From 54 to 65 HP. My wife ran around in supprisingly nippy old Minies for a good few years.

Edited by Stanb Sevento on 17/07/2017 at 00:49

The cost of servicing - 1964 - andyp

I have a bit of a soft spot for the old A Series having had 5 cars fitted with it in 848, 998, 1098 & 1275cc versions. The last of which was a Maestro coupled to a 5 speed cog box where it punched well above its weight give how old a design it was. They always fired up in the morning no matter how cold it was (I certainly couldn't say that about Fords & Vauhalls of the same vintage !) and combined with SU carbs they were economical on fuel.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - SLO76
"I have a bit of a soft spot for the old A Series having had 5 cars fitted with it in 848, 998, 1098 & 1275cc versions. The last of which was a Maestro coupled to a 5 speed cog box where it punched well above its weight give how old a design it was. They always fired up in the morning no matter how cold it was (I certainly couldn't say that about Fords & Vauhalls of the same vintage !) and combined with SU carbs they were economical on fuel."

You lot are making me feel young not having passed my test til 94.

I did enjoy the pleasures of the A series at its tail end via Metro's and Maestro's though. I owned an MG Metro as my first motor which was an absolute pig and I flogged a fair number of BL/Rover Metro/Maestro/Montego stock as rot buckets in the 90's. Not all deserved the reputation they had, especially the Montego which was actually a good old bus just typically underdeveloped as per the norm with BL.

Politics and business never make good bedfellows and the bulk of BL's issues came from illadvised interference from politicians and trade unionists who'd no clue how to build a good car or how to turn a profit.

When the Montego was introduced it was a class leader, had they built it and rust proofed it properly it would've stayed up there in the eyes of owners and as ancient as the A series was it was a reliable and simple engine that deserved its long life, I often used them to jump start other motors in the yard on cold mornings, though the best old tractor I had for this was a rotten Maestro 2.0 D Clubman with the Perkins rattler under the bonnet, which never refused to start. Even Ford kept the old OHV 1300 going in the Ka and Fiesta into the 2000's.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - Glaikit Wee Scunner {P}

They did the job they were designed to at time, didn't they?

Yes they did the job but not for very long. I just about cut my teeth on old A series engines, had a dozen of them at least, everything from 850 Minies to a MG 1300. They needed constant maintenance to keep them from disintigrating, valve stem and just about every other oil seal needed replaced every weekend or at least thats what it felt like. Suspension and steering joints, trailing arm bushes, CV joints all rubbish but cheap as chips. It was a love / hate relationship.

I tuned Mini engines just as a hobby, reshaped the combustion chambers, gas flowed the ports and skimed the cylinder heads and richer needle in the SU carb. From 54 to 65 HP. My wife ran around in supprisingly nippy old Minies for a good few years.

As little work as that to keep it going? You had a good one then. End to end body rot from new and water hose failures, handbrake lever acting as a tin opener.et etc. The good old days.;>]

The cost of servicing - 1964 - RT

lacked pre-production development as well as on-going development - like so many BMC/Austin/Rover models a complete let-down in execution.

They did the job they were designed to at time, didn't they?

No! They needed more work on them than Fords for instance.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - craig-pd130

Going through some old family paperwork the older generation found a receipt for the cost of servicing a Morris Traveller in 1964. Service carried out at village garage - 10,000 miles - 14 shillings and 6 d. For those who've only lived in decimal times that equates to, I'm told, 72.5 pence. The 9,000 mile service was the same price!

That's the equivalent of about £15 in today's money. Even though 60s cars didn't have many consumables (air filters could often be washed & reused, no cambelts etc), it's still very cheap.

Almost compensates for the fact that cars of that era needed servicing every 3,000 miles or so, not to mention the ongoing repairs inbetween ;-)

The cost of servicing - 1964 - gordonbennet

My last A series was a 1275 A+ in a new Ital van.

A superb van which went rather well handled nicely and the engine/exhaust had a lovely gruff note, a workmate and i travelled roughly 65 miles each way cross country every weekday to cover a contract we were on, the van was driven hard often with two complete lorry spare tyres on steel wheels in the back, and never once let us down...but it was serviced (in house) above and beyond because the haulier we worked for believed that good maintenance was essential.

I think the A and B (and O as in 2200 versions) series engines in FWD form were unfairly criticised, the problem being as they held so much oil due to the gearbox sharing the sump, an oil change was expensive so cheapo oil if changed at all was the order of the day.

I had a 2200 Landcrab, it truly was a horrid thing not a patch on a good 1800S (a superb car of its time), an oil change on the 2200 ISTR was some 22 pints.

That service in '64 was cheap, considering a proper service would have included checking and adjusting the drum brakes up (not sure if any Minors got front discs), even checking the brake fluid was a bind with the master cyl being under the drivers feet, however working under the bonnet on those simple cars was a pleasure.

Edited by gordonbennet on 17/07/2017 at 09:49

The cost of servicing - 1964 - skidpan

Cars of that era needed a lube service every 3000 miles with an oil change (using what by todays standards you would not use in your mower) every 6000 miles. In real terms servicing is far cheaper.

Back then the cars would overheat on a warm summers day as soon as you hit traffic and then pack in then the points closed up. And while you sat waiting for the AA man on his motorbike to arrive you could hear the thing rusting away.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - Manatee

I'm fairly sure there were several greasing points on my 1965 Morris Oxford that should have been attended to every 1,000 miles.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - gordonbennet

Still got 6 grease points on the Landcruiser. both propshafts, but that's it.

Most motorists with any nous had their own grease guns back then, and by virtue of money being short most motorists did most of their own maintenance.

Dare say most motorists, who arn't rolling in the money or prefer by choice older or long term cars, still do lots of maintenance themselves.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - Falkirk Bairn

>>Dare say most motorists, who arn't rolling in the money or prefer by choice older or long >>term cars, still do lots of maintenance themselves.

Many, I suggest, do no maintenance at all & never look after the cars.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - gordonbennet

>>Dare say most motorists, who arn't rolling in the money or prefer by choice older or long >>term cars, still do lots of maintenance themselves.

Many, I suggest, do no maintenance at all & never look after the cars.

I suppose i get a slightly warped view as i'm a member of another forum where old and often unloved cars are the point of the foru, and simply have to be looked after in order to keep them going.

It's true where i live i never see another bonnet up apart from John along the road who has an older Freelander and looks after it well, most cars where i live are new or newish, never see a bonnet up, luckily our driveway is quite hidden so few know i have the tools and reasonable facilities for looking after cars, my neighbour at my last house was a pita always whittling to try and get me to do things on his car, i'd get home after a 14 hour shift and he'd be there like a loyal dog to greet me with a problem.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - craig-pd130

Nice period road test here of a Vanden Plas Princess 1100: www.flickr.com/photos/triggerscarstuff/sets/721576.../

As it's an A-series lump with the gearbox in the sump, servicing is given as 8.5 pints of straight 20W or 30W and filter every 3,000 miles: however the filter can be changed every 6,000 miles when using 'multigrade' oils :-D

4 grease points every 3,000 miles, too.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - dadbif
When I joined the RAF in 1963 I was paid 15/- (75p) a week.
Mind you, beer was a hell of a lot cheaper then, a pint and 10 embassy were only a couple of bob.
The cost of servicing - 1964 - galileo
When I joined the RAF in 1963 I was paid 15/- (75p) a week. Mind you, beer was a hell of a lot cheaper then, a pint and 10 embassy were only a couple of bob.

I knew a lad who was an RAF Corporal, he said it was well paid, board, lodging and kit provided so pay was all spending money (unless he had some scam running like Milo in Catch 22)

As I recall at that time petrol was about 4/0d (20p) a gallon, beer was 1/6 (7p) a pint, cigarettes under 4/0d (20p) for 20. Road tax about £12 10s (12.50) a year, TPFT insurance for my A40 Devon about £13, tyres around £4 to £5 each.

My student grant was £300 a year, £10 per week over the 30 weeks of terms, B & B in University approved lodgings £4 10s a week, so £5 10s a week for books, clothes, food and drink during the day, during the vacations students usually did temporary jobs as builders' labourers, petrol pump attendants etc, (I worked in a foundry myself)

First fulltime job in 1964 was £17 a week before tax/NI etc, had to travel a fair distance to work so train fares or petrol were significant costs.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - Avant

I hope your memories of your A40 Devon were pleasant ones, Galileo. My parents had one new in 1951, and my first ever car (in 1969) was a 14-year-old A50 Cambridge. I should think it depended on how well previous owners had looked after it: I was lucky with mine and was very fond of it. Never let me down.

Austins in those days, with OHV engines, 4-speed gearboxes and independent front suspension, were well ahead of the competition, some of which had side-valve engines, or 3-speed gearboxes, or were unreliable. Fords were all three.....but look at Ford now and what happened to Austin of England. Sad.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - Vitesse6

My Dad's friend always bought new BMC motors every couple of years. He turned up one day to show off his new Japanese car. After a few months he came again and said that with BMC he always kept a notebook and noted down all the defects that he wanted put right by the dealer. With the Japanese car there was nothing to put right as nothing had broken/dropped off.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - galileo

My Dad's friend always bought new BMC motors every couple of years. He turned up one day to show off his new Japanese car. After a few months he came again and said that with BMC he always kept a notebook and noted down all the defects that he wanted put right by the dealer. With the Japanese car there was nothing to put right as nothing had broken/dropped off.

We had friends who bought one of the first Datsun's, what struck me was that heater and radio were included, at a time when BMC charged extra for these. Anyone else remember freezing journeys in heaterless cars in the cold winters we used to have so regularly?

The cost of servicing - 1964 - Avant

Fortunately not! Going back to the A40 Devon, that actually had a heater: it was a basic recirculatory one but better than nothing. I think my 1955 A50 had directional controls for screen or floor.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - Falkirk Bairn

1966 - my first brand new car. Cortina - Total, on road was some £612, inc Road Tax £12.50

Petrol was 4/8d per gallon = 24p /gallon = 5.3p/litre

Standard were crossplies, radials was an upgrade & cost me £10 IIRC.

(New radials were about £7.00 each)

Seat Belts were extra £5.00 each for 2 - no rear belts these days.

Washers & a washer bag were extra as was a demist plastic panel for the rear window. Bonnet lock was £2.50 to supply & fit.

Servicing, every 5 or 6K was around £7 @ the main for dealer.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - argybargy

Slightly off topic and a decade and a half later than the period mentioned in the OP, but after I first joined the fire service in 1979, colleagues would regularly bring their cars onto station on night shifts to carry out major work; engine and gearbox replacements etc. Many stations had an inspection pit and heavy duty trolley jacks suitable for lifting HGVs.Most of these guys had Escorts, Cortinas, Heralds etc etc...cars they had owned for years and kept in good nick by maintaining them using station facilities.

Nowadays I very much doubt whether any firefighter has the time, the expertise, or indeed the access to publicly funded facilities provided on station to do anything but the most routine work on a personal vehicle.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - Fishermans Bend

Futher receipts:-

December 1975 - 3 gallons of petrol £2.19 = 73 pence a gallon

November 1976 - MOT = £2.10

July 1976 - 12,000 miless service for Austin Maxi at supplying dealer £25.27. The 9.5 pints of castrol GTX cost £3.29 in total. Oil filter £1.30. Air filter £1.80. 4 Champion spark plugs £1.92.

January 1976 - 3,000 miles service for same car at same dealer - £5.27.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - expat

Of course back then you needed to do valve grinds, decoking etc. Now you never hear of such things. Same with replacement engines which were quite a normal thing to wear out. Now you only replace the engine if you have a major malfunction. Clutches were another item that had a much shorter life in those days. Not to mention rust repairs. Remember plating rusted out sills, chassis rust etc?

The cost of servicing - 1964 - MikeM100

Hmmm that was all very nostalgic !

My Dad was in the Fire Service (Leicester) in the Sixties and he used to get our Austin 7, Standard 10 'serviced' using the excellent station facilities.

We lived in a Fire Service house on an estate attached to the Fire Station which made a real sense of community.

As a student (about 1969) I worked in the Summer holidays as a petrol pump attendant. What a great job that was - lots of tips helped me buy my Lambretta scooter.

I recall it was an 'Esso' station which mean't 'Happy Motoring' according to the TV jingles ?

AND it was happy times.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - MikeM100

Hmmm that was all very nostalgic !

My Dad was in the Fire Service (Leicester) in the Sixties and he used to get our Austin 7, Standard 10 'serviced' using the excellent station facilities.

We lived in a Fire Service house on an estate attached to the Fire Station which made a real sense of community.

As a student (about 1969) I worked in the Summer holidays as a petrol pump attendant. What a great job that was - lots of tips helped me buy my Lambretta scooter.

I recall it was an 'Esso' station which mean't 'Happy Motoring' according to the TV jingles ?

AND it was happy times.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - expat
When I joined the RAF in 1963 I was paid 15/- (75p) a week. Mind you, beer was a hell of a lot cheaper then, a pint and 10 embassy were only a couple of bob.

In 1964 I was working as a library assistant and getting 8 pounds a week. That was a fairly normal wage then. I assume you only got 15/- because it was all found. Meals, accommodation etc were provided. It still seems pretty miserly though.

The cost of servicing - 1964 - Vitesse6

There were people who would come round and rebore your engine in your garage for you. The adverts I remember from the Manchester Evening News were 10/6 (52.5p) per bore

The cost of servicing - 1964 - John F

Only rich people paid for 'servicing' and repairs in the 60s. I remember my old Ford Pop losing 1st gear (lost a few teeth from the cogwheel). Jacked it up, undid prop shaft, dropped the box, dismantled and replaced offending cog. Well within capability of a child brought up with a Meccano set (like German children probably still are).

 

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