Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - Eli-joby Maeckelberghe

Hi all

I've been looking at buying a van to replace my 406 estate as I now have twice as many tools as she can carry. I'm thinking about getting a car loan from my bank Lloyds which means I can splash a little cash, well, more than what I've got anyway, the question is what to go for??!! It's a brave new world and all advice is welcome !

I've gone down a certain path and would love some advice on buying something like this : www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/20170612636...1

This is a beaut to look at with some lovely pratical chassis design and an economic engine! Problem is you have to go high millage unless you want to spend dollar. This one has 179000 on the clcok which is hellish for a 13 reg, I'm pressuming anyway. I'm not normally put off by high millage and espeically when you see it has full service history with regular servicing. A major downside in my mind is resale with such high millage.

What do you guys think?

Regards

Eli-Joby

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - RobJP

Going from a 406 estate to a HUGE van ?

I'd have thought something like a Kangoo would be a far better size.

Anyway, a couple of items

Forget how economical the figues claim something is going to be. Assume about 30mpg for that, not the claimed 42mpg.

Assume that it'll be almost unsellable at any price in the future - it's rapidly going to be over 200k miles on the clock. So view it as you will buy it and run it until it dies.

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - badbusdriver

Personally, I'd say no, buy something with reasonable mileage that you can afford. Couple of years older, maybe slightly more expensive, but no more than about 80k miles. As far as I'm aware, the 2.2 engine in this van is the same as the one used in the 'standard' transit as well as the citroen relay and peugeot boxer (I think the fiat ducato uses a 2.3 iveco engine). But the thing is, they are generally much cheaper than the transit custom. So if you were to up your budget to £7k, you could probably get a 2012ish relay or boxer with the same engine but sensible miles. Assuming there are no inherent problems with that engine, if much rather go for one of them than a transit custom with 180k on the clock.

I'd also be seriously considering whether I needed to get a van that big. A 406 estate has quite a large load area floor, but it isn't very tall. So something like a lwb transit connect, or kangoo maxi may well offer you the space you need but (especially the kangoo) will be much cheaper to buy, and much more efficient on fuel than a 'full sized' van. I mentioned the kangoo specifically, because after using this forum for some time now, it seems fairly apparent that most smaller diesel engines, of the type you get in cars or smaller vans, are to be avoided due to dpf problems, or just reliability in general!. The one engine which seems to escape the scorn of the forum members is the 1.5 renault unit which can be found in the renault kangoo, the mercedes citan and the nissan nv200. Now the nissan can only be had in one standard size, but the mercedes and renault are both available as lwb versions (though confusingly the mercedes is labelled xlwb).

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - gordonbennet

The underfloor and integral chassis could rot like hell on the previous model Transit, whether the new model is the same i don't know, something i'd be checking out along with the usual research as to whether these new models have the same unburstable toughness and simplicity of the 'smiley' and previous versions.

For the most reliable long term bet in similar size vans have a look at Toyota Hiace, but not the latest version which is a rebadged Citroen apparently, the previous model was virtually unchanged for many years with only a mild facelift, 2.5 litre Hilux engine with or without turbo either of which will give years of trouble free service if maintained, have cambelts but simplicity itself to change, roughly an hour.

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - badbusdriver

I'd agree with gordonbennet regarding the hi ace, but the problem is going to be finding one. And even if you do find a later facelifted version, they can be pretty expensive, I know, I've looked often enough!.

Couple of things following up my 1st reply. The Fiat ducato did indeed use the 2.3 iveco engine, but only up to around 2010, when it changed to the same 2.2 used in the Citroën relay, Peugeot boxer and the transit.

I'm afraid I'm not tech savvy enough to post links, but after a quick look on autotrader, I discovered 2 Peugeot boxer's which, imo, would be much better buys than your mega-mileage transit custom. Both 2014, both with the 110PS version of the 2.2 engine. One was white, had just over 60k miles, and was £6695+vat, the other was red and had just under 50k miles and was £6995+vat. Not sure if it makes a difference, but the 1st of those was the 333 version, which has a 3.3t gvw and a huge payload of about 1500kg. The other was the more common 330 (3t gvw) with a payload of around 1200kg.

Something else you might consider is the hyundai i load. This is the van version of the i800 mpv. The van has the same 2.5 diesel as the car but in a lower state of tune, 114bhp (I think the i800 has about 150bhp). Not sure about any reliability issues with that engine (maybe someone else can help here?), but Korean cars are generally pretty well regarded reliability wise.

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - nellyjak

I'd agree with previous comments...it seems a Helluva jump from the 406 to a Transit.

Something inbetween would seem to make more sense.

I agree too, that the van would be worth very little given the mileage you will have accrued when you have finished with it.

I'm not a low mileage freak as it doesn't always telll the full story for a vehicle...higher mileage vehicles that have been well used BUT well serviced can be a really good buy. But starting at 179k miles is, for me, just a bit too much.

I think you could safely say that its best days are behind it.,!!

Good luck in your search.

Edited by nellyjak on 01/07/2017 at 10:54

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - RichardW

180k, FSH, last service at 156k? Says it all really. The original owner has got shot of it for some reason, no way would I pay over £7k for it!!

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - FiestaOwner

These only get an oil change every 30,000 miles (according to Ford). I feel that's far too big an interval.

Does anyone have any idea of a realistic life expectancy of these engines at these ridiculous oil change intervals?

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - gordonbennet

around 179,500 if our OP buys it :-)

Have Ford fitted an oil spinner or a secondary by pass oil filter system to warrant 30k oil changes, that's getting into lorry/bus mileage but they are fitted with spinners and the sump holds around 5 to 7 gallons on a 12+ litre engine.

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - FiestaOwner

around 179,500 if our OP buys it :-)

Have Ford fitted an oil spinner or a secondary by pass oil filter system to warrant 30k oil changes, that's getting into lorry/bus mileage but they are fitted with spinners and the sump holds around 5 to 7 gallons on a 12+ litre engine.

I've no idea, I suspect not.

I drive a 2.2 (15 plate) Transit for my work. That's how I know about the oil change intervals. They do get an intermediate 'CHECK' every 15,000 miles, but nothing gets changed then.

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - daveyK_UK

some good pre reg and brand new deals on the Fiat Doblo van or the MPV version.

its a decent van, although i would go for the MPV version if you can live without a huige load area

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - FiestaOwner

Just remember that the majority of vans are subject to lower speed limits than a car (even vans smaller than the one you've linked to).

Link regarding van speed limits: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/car-derived-vans-and-dual-purpose-vehicles/car-derived-vans-and-dual-purpose-vehicles

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - badbusdriver

Just remember that the majority of vans are subject to lower speed limits than a car (even vans smaller than the one you've linked to).

Link regarding van speed limits: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/car-derived-vans-and-dual-purpose-vehicles/car-derived-vans-and-dual-purpose-vehicles

This is a subject which is both irritating and confusing!.

Irritating, because, as a lwb transit connect driver (2300kg gvw) I am subject to a 50mph speed limit on the majority of the roads I drive. Yet the driver of a series 3 discovery, for example, even with nothing in it weighs way more than my van fully laden can drive on the same roads at 60mph. How is that fair?

Confusing, because what exactly is a 'car derived van'?. I mean, my transit connect was designed from the outset as a van, but it used bits and pieces from both the focus and mode of, so surely that makes it 'derived from a car'. And how does things like the kangoo, Berlingo and partner fit in, because although they are sold as vans, they are also sold as cars.

It would be much less confusing if it simply went by weight, even though, as I said, that is in itself very annoying. Maybe the government could change it to a simpler system where any vehicle (car or commercial) with a gvw of more than 3000kg (to take into account all the huge SUV's) were subject to the lower speed limits.

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - FiestaOwner

Agree it's both irritating and confusing. At least the van I drive has a gross weight of 3500 kgs (3.5 Tonnes), so it's definately van speed limits.

Have a link to a case on pepipoo regarding someone who was charged with doing 70mph on a dual carriageway with a Berlingo van, even although its gross weight was 1960kgs. He lost in court.

It's worth a read especially post #150: http://forums.pepipoo.com/index.php?showtopic=106958

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - badbusdriver

Interesting post, thanks for that!. I had assumed, mistakenly, that if a case like that were to be argued, due to the vagueness of 'what a car derived van is' the driver involved would get off with it!.

As mentioned, my lwb transit connect also, in no doubt, falls into the lower speed limit class due to its 2.3t gvw. But when it finally gets retired (hopefully will last another few years yet!), I will most likely be getting a smaller van, so it is something which I will need to bear in mind.

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - gordonbennet

Just to add another layer of confusion, if you own a twin cabbed 4x4 pick up, then its classed as a dual purpose vehicle and subject to car speed limits, if it has no 4x4 capability or is not twin cabbed then it's not dual purpose and subject to van limits, there you go clear as mud.

I had one a for a few years and was not sure of things, but our good fiend DVD supplied the wording from the gov website.

Edited by gordonbennet on 02/07/2017 at 15:05

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - FiestaOwner

I was aware of the speed limits for dual purpose vehicles and the definition of "Dual Purpose Vehicle".

I never understood the relevance of having to be 4wd.

Ford Transit Custom - Buying fairly new but high millage wagons - gordonbennet

I was aware of the speed limits for dual purpose vehicles and the definition of "Dual Purpose Vehicle".

I never understood the relevance of having to be 4wd.

How the powers that be know it's a DPV with 4WD i really don't know, maybe there's a speed limit marker put on the system when its registered, in practice very few twin cabs have only 2WD, whether they slip through the system and get away with the higher speeds i don't know.

The wording of the document DVD linked was quite involved, the twin cab and 4WD appeared to be absolutes, but there was some formula for window area too, whether that meant extra cabs ( 2 door but extended cab some with rear seats) don't qualify i don't know, it all got too complicated for me TBH, i had a twin cab with 4WD so printed the relevant document off in case i got a pull from a rare police officer, who might not have known the ins and outs of this.

 

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