Poor visibility at rural crossroads - John F

There have been two recent crashes at our local crossroads. There have been many, and there will be more. This is because one of the crossing roads is curved, so if you approach it towards its concavity, you cannot see approaching traffic because of hedges and tall grass. Surely there must be some safety regulation which prohibits such growth? If landowners wish to enclose there land, should they not use the see-through railing type of fence? Does anyone know the answer to this? Neither the landowners nor the council nor the police wish to take action.

Poor visibility at rural crossroads - skidpan

Take the conditions into account as you drive. Pull out carefully being prepared to stop.

In summer there are thousands of such junctions, always have and always will be.

Poor visibility at rural crossroads - RobJP

There are safety regulations for NEW junctions for visibility splays, etc.

If you feel a particular junction is of substantial danger, then I'd suggest you contact your Highways Dept - in writing - detailing such concerns. They do have the power to take action, and (if need be) to compulsory purchase a strip of land which they can then turn into a visibility splay.

The reason for doing it in writing is quite simple : it means that someone has to look at it and make a formal decision on it. Which means that person could be held liable in the event of (for example) nothing being done, and an accident occurring in the future. Nobody likes to be left with their ass exposed like that, so it makes it far more likely that the junction will be looked at in detail, and mitigation steps taken.

However, it's just as likely that, if the risk was viewed as substantial, they'd simply reduce the speed limit in the area, or start enforcement of any existing limit. After all, slower vehicles = less chance of collision or injury = less risk.

Poor visibility at rural crossroads - Stanb Sevento

In general the strip of land between the raod and a wall or fence, the verge, is mainained by the highways agency and nearly always thats the council"s roads department. Each council has its own mainenance regime but typicaly that will be cutting back vegitation two or three times a year. Getting them to cut more often will take a lot of pressure because its expencive, often a van, a tractor and three men in order to comply with all the safety stuff. The junction should have an advance warning sign in all directions and possibly give way lines on one of the roads.

Other than that as Skidpan saiys drive to the conditions, slow down or even stop till you can be sure its safe, the responsability is with the driver. Traffic engineers often block sight lines at junctions and roundabout to force traffic to slow down, the idea being if you can see nothing comming from 100m away drivers put thier foot down and then cant stop when something unexpected happens.

Edited by Stanb Sevento on 30/06/2017 at 16:11

Poor visibility at rural crossroads - Dwight Van Driver

Section79 Highways Act 1980 - but can they serve notice on themselves?

also

Section154 HIghways Act, 1980 - seems more appropriate

but as ss says ^^^^^^ one should drive at such a speed as to be able to stop in the distance which one can see to be clear

dvd

Poor visibility at rural crossroads - gordonbennet

Don't think they got the memo at the HA or local councils.

In Northants its not just rural junctions, if they happen to build a new roundabout that's flowing too well they'll either put traffic lights on it or erect 400yds of 6 ft fencing on the central recerve on the approach so you can't see what's coming till you actually reach the island itself, or they'll plant a small forest on the island itself so you can possibly see anyone hooning around till the very last second, well done chaps.

You want to try emerging onto a blind roundabout with cars capable of taking the curve at 60mph with a 60ft lorry with a whole 10bhp per ton of power available, and Satan's automated manual gearbox letting you have movement when it, not you, pleases.

There are lunatics in charge.

Poor visibility at rural crossroads - badbusdriver

As a van driver, the junctions I hate most are ones where you approach at an angle, which in a car would mean looking through the n/s rear side window, which I don't have!. If it's a junction I know and am familiar with, I will do as much as I can to alleviate the problem with my position on the road. But if I'm not familiar the road, a junction can present itself with little warning in order for me to get into a better position!.

But I do know a few junctions where excess bushes, trees whatever (especially during the summer), make it tricky to pull out safely.

Poor visibility at rural crossroads - John F

Thanks, dvd, that's very helpful.

Poor visibility at rural crossroads - glidermania

If there's any traffic signs that are obstructed say to warn oncoming traffic of the side road then the local council or highways department could be held partly responsible in any accident.

Im not sure if www.fixmystreet.com would cover the problem? Near me, a housholder had allowed a privot hedge to become overgrown such that pedestrians were forced to walk in the road to get past the house! Afetr a number of entries to the site, the privot was eventually cut back.

Poor visibility at rural crossroads - Andrew-T

.... one of the crossing roads is curved, so if you approach it towards its concavity, you cannot see approaching traffic because of hedges and tall grass. Surely there must be some safety regulation which prohibits such growth? If landowners wish to enclose there land, should they not use the see-through railing type of fence? .

You presumably don't live in rural Cheshire. I have lived in that county since the late 60's and a typical junction here has about 20 yards of metal railing on most, if not all, approaches. The problem has been acknowledged for a long time. I know nothing of any 'regulations' but it may have been introduced by an old-style county council.

Poor visibility at rural crossroads - Fishermans Bend

To help me at junctions where there is poor visibility I open a window, or two, and listen, amazing how much you can hear to help assess approoaching traffic.

Poor visibility at rural crossroads - gordonbennet

To help me at junctions where there is poor visibility I open a window, or two, and listen, amazing how much you can hear to help assess approoaching traffic.

Very good tip that, there is one junction in particular i use now and again when the usual routes home are rammed, fast traffic comes from both sides so both windows open to listen for the fastest approaches, much safer from the seat of me Landcruiser as can see over more of the hedges.

 

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