Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

Hi All

Looking for car change recommendations again, please. I did ask here a while ago about a used Beemer or even Merc, but realised in the end that I probably couldn't afford to run one, especially if it became troublesome. So I'm looking for something modest, around the seven/ seven and a half grand mark, not a diesel. Something with a decent ride, unlike the concrete suspension of this Focus, which is slowly turning the vertebrae of both my wife and I to mush.

I'd like a 1.6 engine, decent boot, reasonable reputation for reliability (obviously) and preferably Focus-sized or thereabouts. With enough power to make those occasional country road overtaking maneouvres stress free.

Not bothered about parking sensors or any of that malarkey, but if they're there I won't take them off.

My son bought a very nice Kia Ceed the other day, a petrol version, but having looked on the auction sites the vast majority of the newer (2014 onwards) examples of that model for sale are diesels, and I'm pretty well dead set on petrol.

Cheers in advance.

Edited by argybargy on 10/06/2017 at 21:59

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - SLO76
A perfectly decent car all round. The 1.6 GDi petrol is lively enough if you rev it with 133bhp and to date has few reliability vices that's I've heard of. I'd recommend upping your budget to £8-£8.5k which will get you a good approved used car from a Main Dealer that's got a full dealer history and the balance of that excellent 7yr warranty. I'd stick to the manual as the auto is hard to sell on.

On the negative side, petrol Cee'd's tend to drop in value far more rapidly than the diesels. The likes of a 1.8 Honda Civic or 1.6 Toyota Auris will hold its value better but the Honda will be older for the same money and the ride can be firm on sportier models. The Auris is a very good longterm bet.

The Seat Leon 1.4 TSi is a lovely wee car to drive with loads of midrange pull and almost diesel like economy. Ride is ok on the SE but firm on the sportier versions again but not overly so in my opinion. To date the later TSi engines are proving robust but it's still early days and they are more complex than a normally asperated Kia, Toyota, Mazda or Honda. It'll need a full dealer history and continued maintenance there.

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Edited by SLO76 on 11/06/2017 at 08:22

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

Thanks for that very helpful and detailed reply.

I'm pretty well set on fighting shy of diesels after the recent emission test controversies, and I will definitely stick with petrol.

The budget you suggest is currently out of my range, unfortunately. However, the deal my son got on his Kia was good enough to encourage me that they can be had for less money. HIs previous car was a rather scruffy 59 plate Fiesta with over 100k miles, and some damage to a rear door. The Kia was on an auction site for 7k, and the dealer gave him 2k trade in on the Fiesta, leaving a balance of 5k for a 3 year old car with about 23 thousand miles and yes, the balance of that warranty.

If there's any chance at all of getting something similar I reckon I might keep looking. I'm really not too bothered about the depreciation side of things because my next car, like the Focus, will be with us for the long term.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - scot22

argybargy I have had a lot of help from the forum. I agree with definitely not diesel for many reasons - not least I've had a number of expensive repairs to 2007 Volvo. Unfortunately I've still got it because the right car has not come up locally.

My current top choice is a manual 1.6 petrol Auris ( not the latest model ) not been able to get a test drive in one close enough to me. In the event of problems don't want to deal with someone a fair way away.

I am leaning towards cars up to 2012 - budget and avoiding as much as possible things like EPB and wipers that come on if its raining. I can do that myself thank you.

Good Luck in your search. I now take my time in deciding to spend my money on a car.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - SLO76
You will find one for your budget but the best approved used low mileage stock are a bit higher. Just be careful that any you look at have a full Kia service history otherwise that warranty is worthless despite what the seller tells you. They generally refuse claims without a full dealer history. Paying a bit more for a good car is even more important if you intend on longterm ownership.
Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

Thanks again, both. As stated above, the Focus has been a good car but the hardness of the ride now makes replacement a short term imperative rather than a matter of years. The men with hammers who batter the car from underneath when we take to the road are no longer welcome companions on a long journey.

I guess that if the right car came along I could stretch another 500 quid to, say, 8 grand, but that partly depends on getting a decent price for my Focus. I originally intended to sell it privately, but my son's experience has persuaded me that decent trade in values can be had if circumstances allow. I was hoping to delay making the change till a pending increase in my monthly income allows me to consider taking out one of those personal contract arrangements on a new car, but I've noticed some bad publicity about them lately.

Noted the comments about service history; must ask my son what the paperwork tells him about his car. I know it has a Northern Ireland plate, and he's assured me that the documentation is in order, though I don't know whether he's actually checked it or just taken the dealer's word. We'll see what transpires.

Edited by argybargy on 12/06/2017 at 10:05

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - gordonbennet

To avoid jarring ride the best thing is to avoid anything running on elastic bands stretched round oversized wheels..though there are always exceptions to this it is normally the case.

Try and find something on 16" wheels at worse with preferably 60 or 65 aspect tyres but make 55 aspect the worse case scenario and you'll be heading in the right direction.

Agree with Auris suggestion, and Ceed/i30 so long as they are sensibly shod, also consider Mazda 3.

If it appeals one of the smoothest rides you will find without going too large is Berlingo.

Edited by gordonbennet on 12/06/2017 at 10:37

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - SkodaIan

Look for a car where the model has just changed, as you'll get a newer car for your money that way. Hyundai i30 might be a good bet based on this, a quick look on Autotrader shows 14 reg cars with normal miles within your budget. A perfectly competent car, and the ride is at the softer end for cars in that segment.

There's also the default option of an Astra, mostly on there being a larger number available which also had a model change fairly recently too so you'd again get a 14 reg for your money. I'd recommend the 1.4 (non turbo) over the 1.6 as it is nicer to drive, uses less fuel and only has slightly less real life power.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

Thanks once more. Gordonbennet, the Focus has 16 inch wheels, but they're clearly constructed of concrete. I guess we could try a hovercraft as an alternative, or fit a bigger motor on my Flymo. Not thought about the Berlingo, though I seem to recall it looks a bit like a van. Still, if it keeps our backbones intact, then street cred really will have to take a back seat.

Skodalan, I've seen recommendations for the Hyundai on a number of threads and sites, so I'll definitely have a look at that. I particularly like the idea that it might be within budget. ;0)

I was warned off the newer Astra because of the potential for expensive sensors and things under the bonnet to fail, but that was the diesel and I've narrowed my search to petrol.

Edited by argybargy on 14/06/2017 at 09:43

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - Mike H

Not thought about the Berlingo, though I seem to recall it looks a bit like a van.

When/if you drive one, you'll find the van origins are very obvious. Not a great experience. I have just renewed my acquaintance with my father's Peugeot Partner Tepee, which is just a badge-engineered version of the Berlingo, and it's truly horrid compared to our CR-V - but also significantly cheaper.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - badbusdriver

Not thought about the Berlingo, though I seem to recall it looks a bit like a van.

When/if you drive one, you'll find the van origins are very obvious. Not a great experience. I have just renewed my acquaintance with my father's Peugeot Partner Tepee, which is just a badge-engineered version of the Berlingo, and it's truly horrid compared to our CR-V - but also significantly cheaper.

The Berlingo and partner are truly great family cars if you place practically, usability and value for money above vanity and impressing your friends/work colleagues/neighbours. We had a partner back in 2002 and it was perfect for our needs at the time, with a 1 year old and 5 year old. We could put the baby buggy in the boot without folding (which was just soooo handy!) it and still had space for a week's shopping. Plus, sliding doors, when you have young kids really are the only sensible option. It had that wonderful ability that all French cars used to have (but which everyone including the French seem to have forgotten how to do), of both riding AND handling really well.

Sorry, but I'd take one any day of the week over your CRV, or indeed, any other SUV.

There are more important things in life than a soft touch dashboard!

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - Mike H

Sorry, but I'd take one any day of the week over your CRV, or indeed, any other SUV.

There are more important things in life than a soft touch dashboard!

Agreed, and having a car that's pleasant to drive is one of them ;-)

It was OK on the motorway I grant you, but the way it crashes and bangs its way around on anything other than a smooth surface makes it tiring and irritating. The CR-V is our first SUV, having come from a Saab 9-5 estate, and it's quite different to the Saab. But I just can't hack the wobbling and crashing of the Partner off the motorway and around town. It's a van with windows. My father loves it, and I'm not disputing that it fulfils a purpose, but it's not my cup of tea.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - SLO76
I have to admit to being a fan of the first gen Berlingo. It was cheap, hugely practical, long lived (excluding the terrible 1.6 diesel), had a lovely supple ride and was surprisingly enjoyable to drive overall, especially with the near bombproof 8v 2.0 HDi but the current gen has lost much of what the earlier cars so appealing. It's much dearer, it's bigger, the ride is much firmer in a misguided quest to cut body roll (as if anyone looking for a spirited drive would buy a French MPV) and the quirky looks and interior have been replaced with just a bland box on wheels, not to mention that almost all of them are saddled with that notoriously fragile 1.6 diesel we oft talk of on here. I'd buy a first gen 1.9 or 2.0 diesel or even a 1.4/1.6 petrol, preferably the post facelift but wouldn't touch the 2nd gen.

Edited by SLO76 on 15/06/2017 at 22:03

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - Mike H

The one I've been driving is a 2011 90bhp 1.6 diesel, in fact the engine is the best part of it! It's only covered around 30,000 miles in 6 years, but despite being the "diesel of doom" it has been absolutely no problem for my father. It has been regularly serviced, being a Motabilty car for my mother initially but my father bought it when she died and has kept it dealer-serviced since. I guess it's a bit of a sweeping generalisation to tar all these engines with the same brush, as there must be more good 'uns than bad 'uns, but you don't hear about the good 'uns.

Edited by Mike H on 15/06/2017 at 22:14

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - SLO76
The bulk of owners don't have a problem, certainly not at 30,000 miles but the failure rate is far higher than with any other engine on the market at the moment. I know of several personally, have seen loads smoking their way through auctions with knackered turbo seals and whistling bearings while a quick sniff round the net will reveal far too many owners who've suffered costly failures of this engine in their Ford, Peugeot, Citroen, Mini or Volvo. It's regarded as soft by the trade and trade ins and auction stock are valued factoring in that risk so although you may not have had any mechanical problems you will take a financial hit from its reputation.

Edited by SLO76 on 15/06/2017 at 22:24

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - badbusdriver

Our partner was also a motability car, my wife's. It was only a 1.4 petrol with 75bhp but was geared to make maximum use of what it had, so rarely felt underpowered. I did actually drive it from North East Scotland to Coventry for my Sister in law's wedding and it was absolutely fine. OK, the revs were pretty high, but the little engine was smooth and fairly quiet. The only thing which puts me off getting another, now that I have converted my wife to the benefits of an automatic gearbox, is the auto partner/Berlingo's have the single clutch automated manuals!.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - daveyK_UK
You can get the current Citroen berlingo multispace and Peugeot partner tepee with the excellent 1.2 pure tech engine.

It's a fantastic set up and as you can get them for £13k brand new, a bit of a bargain
Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

Fascinating discussion guys, thanks.

We went to have a look at a 63 plate Hyundai i30 yesterday, at a local main dealer whose name begins with "L". Nice looking car with a great gearbox, but the 1.4 engine gave a disappointingly flat performance. Additionally, and although the ride was better than our Focus (though nowhere near as good as I'd hoped), the road noise in the back was about the same, and this for a car with 25k on the clock.

Got back to the dealership from the road test in two minds, but mind made up when, after trying to sell us several additional insurance policies on the Hyundai (including alloy wheel insurance, even though it had steel wheels) they offered us a derisory part ex on our Focus, and refused to budge from that figure.

Not a nice experience, and one we'll be avoiding by keeping away from main dealers unless we sell ours privately first.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - SLO76
What model of Focus is it, what mileage, any service history, what Mot and how much did they offer?

I'm not surprised you found the 1.4 sluggish, you need the 1.6 GDi at least to get any useful out of town performance. As for ride quality, they're not bad but again to get decent reviews from the bulk of the motoring press they need a good handling and ride balance with the emphasis more to handling than ride sadly.

Try a Nissan Qasqai if you want comfort over handling but these are largely Renault Meganes underneath so don't expect top drawer reliability or quality. Prices are higher too.

I find the Toyota Auris bends more towards ride comfort than ultimate handling too. The 1.6 petrol should be capable enough for you and reliability and longevity are a given. The Avensis is also a good option in 1.8 petrol if you don't mind a larger car.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

I suppose I thought the power might be equivalent to my son's Ceed, or his previous car, the Fiesta, which although also a 1.4 felt nippier than the Hyundai. Our last 4 or 5 cars have all been 1.6 at least, and whatever faults my Focus has in terms of ride, the 1.6 Ti engine still delivers decent power very smoothly right through the range.

The MOT on my Focus runs out 7th July; it has full history, 80k and (as above) its the 1.6 Ti. I know it'll pass the next test but I can appreciate that the dealer would take the opportunity to value it as a car without an MOT. Nevertheless, the 700 nicker they offered me landed at the very bottom of my expectations. On the positive side, such a poor offer made it even easier to walk away from the wrong car.

I will look at the Auris and Avensis, thanks. I saw a nice looking Golf on an auction site today, a 1.4 DSG, 12 plate with just 20k miles and surprisingly given the size of the engine, over 120 bhp under the bonnet. I might enquire about that one, though I know little or nothing about the reliability of more modern VWs, our last affair with that marque having been a banana-yellow X reg which once came out on top in a spat with a brick wall. A quick trawl on Google does lead to mention of problems with the DSG gearbox, however, so.....

Edited by argybargy on 19/06/2017 at 21:29

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - SLO76
The Mk II Focus was and still is an excellent car. Great to drive and the Yamaha designed Zetec SE is a lovely quick revving, smooth and long lived engine if looked after. The VVT system in yours adds an extra 15bhp but was never a good seller as it was kind of piggy in the middle with the stronger 1800 hardly any dearer.

It is however a ten year old mass produced car that's too old for most dealers to retail and through the ring with a short Mot it'll be lucky to better £700-£800 and the dealer has to pay to transport it and pay fees to sell it. They've offered you what it's worth to be honest.

You will get more in a private sale, up to £1,200 assuming its mechanically ok and tidy enough but you'll have to get it through another test and you'll have the hassle of dealing with time wasters, scam artists and idiot offers not to mention that 99% of viewers won't be insured to test drive it and there's always the risk of an irate buyer returning if something goes wrong. I flog cars on Gumtree and Autotrader all the time and the trash I have to filter out is unbelievable plus I have trade insurance to cover demos. It's a minefield.

Locally (Ayrshire) I offer to buy trade ins like this for at least what your offered then i will (for free) view the prospective purchase, advise on what said possible purchase should be and will help negotiate a discount for no trade in plus advise on the cheapest way to finance it. Everyone walks away better off, including the dealer who doesn't have an old trade in he has to auction.

However it's not wise to focus (pardon the pun) on what you're offered for your Focus. It's the figure to change which is the important number. Some dealers heavily overprice but discount more and offer more in part ex, our local Mazda dealer is one example. Their cars are hugely over book but they will negotiate, and certainly need to. Many others have keener screen prices and thus lower margins and less room to over allow on your trade in. Is this true of the car you've viewed? If they offer more than £700-£800 for your car then they have to be making it back on the screen price at the other end or in an overly high finance rate if you're borrowing.

Regarding the Golf. It's a good car and rides well as long as you avoid daft optional wide wheels and the 1.4 TSi engines are very efficient and offer good performance but the DSG gearbox is notorious for expensive problems later in life and is best avoided. If you want one buy manual only. These are also complex engines that require full main dealer or genuine service history, don't touch one without it and expect to pay the cost of continuing it. The longterm reliability of these engines is still unproven but they're well liked by the trade to date. Incorrect maintenance or a lack of it will kill it in no time.

Personally if you can live with the firmer ride I'd just keep the Focus. It's next to worthless now and It's still a better drive than many more modern cars especially with regard to steering feel thanks to it having a hydraulic system instead of the electric racks in newer cars which mostly feel artificial and a bit numb.

Edited by SLO76 on 20/06/2017 at 00:15

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - Avant

I didn't think the Focus was particularly well-known for a hard ride: if the rest of the car is doing OK, then it might be worth researching whether there are alternative wheels and tyres which will fit. A cheaper option than a new car!

If you do want a new car, I agree with the Auris or Mazda 3 options: both can have a 1.6 petrol engine. A Leon, Octavia or Golf are possibilities, but you'd need to find one that's been well looked after (they don't withstand neglect as well as Japanese cars do), and stick to a manual.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

Thanks again. I understand the comments about the trade in price but cars like mine are still being offered privately for well for over a grand on Autotrader, and although I'm not daft enough to think that every price asked for is a price fulfilled, and I do understand that trade in is a very different animal to private sale, I still reckon £700 is below the level of reasonable bottom end for this model. It should have a full MOT by Friday, so I'll keep looking and if I don't sell it privately in the meantime I'll probably settle with anyone who can offer trade in around the grand mark. I'm 100 per cent sure such deals are out there.

I do understand what you mean about "price to change": a comparison between a lower trade in against a moderately priced car, as opposed to a generous trade in against the same car at a higher price is not necessarily a valid one. Perhaps my expectations have been unreasonably raised by my son's experience of trading in a 59 plate 1.4 Fiesta with over 100k on the clock and a damaged door for 2k against a 7k car. Must get a grip on reality, and do it quickly. ;0)

I was notified this morning that the DSG has been withdrawn from sale and is no longer in the picture, but in any case I'd already seen enough negative info about the DSG gearbox on Google to decide to steer clear of that model.

As for uprating the suspension on the Focus, good shout but then we get into the realms of "throwing good money after bad". We've talked at length about keeping this car for another 3 years until my finances change and we can consider one of those personal contract thingies on a new car (which I know do have their drawbacks). However, because of the hard ride (and sorry, but it IS hard for 'er indoors, even if not so hard for me), we've decided that "a leisurely determination to get a decent deal on a car at some time in the near future" is the best strategy, and in the meantime I'll do my best to swerve round as many potholes as I can (whilst driving with due care and attention, of course). Noted again about the Auris, and the other models mentioned, but I would still consider a low mileage auto as long as it was a genuine self-shift with a decent reputation, and nothing like the horrid pseudo-auto Easytronic box that I once had on an 04 Meriva.

Incidentally, SLO, you're absolutely right about the Focus steering. I haven't owned many cars in my 30 years of driving, perhaps a dozen at most, but this car kicks every single previous one into the dustbin in terms of the connection you feel with the road ( and I don't mean the jerk you feel as you pass over each individual lump of gravel). The Hyundai we drove the other day, with its light-footed impression of driving on ice rather than tarmac, brought that home to me, yet again.

Edited by argybargy on 20/06/2017 at 10:27

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

Just had a quick look, and vehicles similar to my "next to worthless" car, many with far more mileage, are being sold on Autodumper for upwards of a grand, sometimes a fair bit more.

Many, admittedly are traders, but if there's that much leeway for making a good buck on an old Focus from a forecourt, there has to be better than 700 quid in the pot for a punter looking to make a deal.

So I'll carry on thinking mine is worth a grand, for now. ;0)

Edited by argybargy on 20/06/2017 at 10:43

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - skidpan

We had a 2005 Focus Mk2, standard suspension with 205 55 16 tyres and the ride was absolutely fine. It steered acurately. I had a BMW at the same time and the mags always go on about how well BMW's with RWD steer. In truth there was little difference between the steering on the 2 cars but the Focus rode way better.

We then had a 2010 Kia Ceed fitted with 225 45 17 tyres and the ride was noticably lumpier than the Focus. Put on the 205 55 16 winter tyres and the ride improved. The steering was fine but subtly different to the Focus. It was slightly lighter and on the 225 17" tyres it was very sensitve to road camber. On a motorway it was hardly noticable but on a more cambered A road it would pull in the direction of the slope. Change to the 205 16" tyres and the pull was less but still there. But it was not an issue, had it on other cars, you got used to it.

The 2013 Leon Mk 3 rode beautifully on the 205 55 16 tyres and it steered strait and true on all roads.

As for what your car is worth that is a simple question t answer, the most anyone will pay you for it. We all overvalue our cars but you have to be realistic. Dealers will often give you what appears to be a god price but that is only because they have overpriced the car they are selling. Buying the same car elsewhere for less and selling your car privately will no doubt give you a better deal.

Its the size of the cheque you write that matters not the £££'s you get for the old car.

I can recomment the Leon 1.4 TSi Mk 3 without hesitation. Brilliant performance, best I have ever owned for the real world and a genuine 45 mpg over the 4 years and 27,000 miles I ran it.

Edited by skidpan on 20/06/2017 at 11:31

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

Many thanks.

I seem to remember reading that the Focus 1.6 Ti Climate has some sort of sports suspension, and that was always my get-out for excusing what I still reckon is a hard ride. Its something I can cope with, but the main point of all this waffle is that my wife can't, so we have to look to change.

I can get a grand for my car; that I know. Whether its against a 7k car or an 8k one is irrelevant, I guess, as long as I know how much I want to pay, in cash, to make that change. I don't want to buy tyre or paintwork insurance or any of that rubbish. If it chips, it chips and I pay to get it fixed, IF its necessary. Tyres can be repaired, or replaced.

The point the other day was that I was being asked to accept somewhere in the region of half the private sale value of my car last time I looked, and on a car that we would love to have liked, but in the end didn't. So we took all the good advice and walked away.

As a comparison, and OK fair comparisons are difficult in the motor trading world, I did some email negotiation with a trader last year on an 11 plate Focus, new shape, which was up for £6500. We agreed 5k to change, meaning a £1500 trade in on mine, but at no point did I ever think that every other dealer would offer me that same figure. For reasons not necessary to explain here, the deal didn't happen.

I'm really grateful for all the advice on this thread and the way ahead looks much clearer, thanks.

By the way, I love the look of the Leon but know nothing about the car, performance, features or reliabiliity wise. However, given your recommendation, skidpan, I'll check out used examples on Autowhatsit.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - SLO76
Let's say a trader gives you £700 for it. First they've got to get it through an Mot, it's bound to need something so let's say £200-£300 including test fee. Then he's got to service it if it's needing done (I certainly would) another £50-£100 then pay to advertise it, pay someone to sell it (commission) and pay VAT on any profit plus they have to factor in their legal obligations regarding it going wrong. It would cost me as a home trader £200-£300 on top of what I gave you to prep it for sale then what's a ten yr old Focus worth £1400-£1500 tops. I'd be advertising it at £1695 aiming to get £500 profit and I am liable for anything major failing in the next few months of ownership.

A dealer with premises has higher overheads than the likes of myself. A quick trawl of Autotrader and Gumtree will show loads of them around £1k privately with a long Mot and that's before negotiation knocks that down. £700-£800 is what it's worth but flog it privately for that and you'll get £200-£500 discount without a trade in depending on the dealer and how much money is in the other motor. If you fixate on your trade in price you'll overpay at the other end or will end up with a sub standard car.

When I was a salesman for a large dealer we always kept a certain amount of stock with inflated screen prices for the customer who was fixated with trade in values and discount. Essentially we marked up to take it off again. The punter didn't win. I'm not saying don't negotiate, of course you should, they'll always offer something extra, in fact I'll bet the dealer you went to will be on the phone to chuck in another £100 today but again don't overvalue your old car. It's worth what it is.
Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

The dealer asked about service history and I told him it had just been serviced. Which it has, and by a reputable mechanic (though he would of course give that reputation little credit, not knowing the guy personally). In any case, in my limited experience main dealers service their own cars and they don't do a particularly good job a lot of the time.

FIne, it will need an MOT pretty soon, and that's reflected in the price. He said they wouldn't offer any trade in on a car with less than 3 weeks MOT, so yes, I can appreciate that mine was hovering around that figure. However, 700 quid? Sorry, but I really don't think that's a fair number, although I do understand the arguments made in its favour. Anyhow as above, by Friday it should have a full MOT, if previous tests are anything to go by. I might even go back to the dealer and just for a larf, if the Hyundai is still on the forecourt, ask him how much the car is worth with a 12 month ticket.

I don't think wanting 300 quid more than I was offered is a "fixation", with all due respect. I know how much cash I want to spend, and the trade in value needs to be at a certain level to allow me to make that deal. Seems more like prudence than whimsy, to me. All the guides about buying cars advise setting a budget and sticking to it, which is exactly what I was doing.

Finally, I do appreciate things like overheads, but I do also wonder whether those overheads need to be factored into every single trade in. But we're going round the houses now, and as above, I'll continue to look for a grand, IF I keep looking till next year. If we still have our Focus come January then that 700 nicker might look like an opportunity missed, but hey ho.

Edited by argybargy on 20/06/2017 at 11:57

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

On reflection and despite myself, I guess I can appreciate the dealer's approach to valuing a car with hardly any MOT. I know from previous experience of the car and from having it serviced recently by someone I trust that it has no major issues, but even if I communicated that to the dealer he couldn't possibly accept my assertion on face value. So he has to factor in the possibility of spending several hundred quid before being able to sell it on. Fair enough.

Once its had the test I'll keep looking and offer it up again for trade in when we find a car that we like; then, lest anyone be interested, report the nature of those offers on this thread. Just for info, like.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - SLO76
With a years Mot you'll almost certainly be able to get to £1,000 or very close to. It eliminates the risk for the buyer so if you're confident it'll pass easily then fire it through. I find social media a good source for selling cheap cars for free. Not the buy sell and swap pages which are populated by idiots wanting a £1500 car for £300 but a well written post on your own Facebook page or a family members of you don't have such a thing will often sell a good budget motor. A fair percentage of my sales are done via word of mouth via Facebook. They know if I sell it and it goes haywire I'll fix it or refund it without a fight unlike most small traders. Though to be honest I've cut way back on it now. It's just too hard to buy decent well maintained stock at sensible money and the two dealers I used to trade with have been bought over and the other closed down. The big chains won't deal direct with traders sadly. ;-)

Edited by SLO76 on 20/06/2017 at 13:19

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy
With a years Mot you'll almost certainly be able to get to £1,000 or very close to. It eliminates the risk for the buyer so if you're confident it'll pass easily then fire it through. I find social media a good source for selling cheap cars for free. Not the buy sell and swap pages which are populated by idiots wanting a £1500 car for £300 but a well written post on your own Facebook page or a family members of you don't have such a thing will often sell a good budget motor. A fair percentage of my sales are done via word of mouth via Facebook. They know if I sell it and it goes haywire I'll fix it or refund it without a fight unlike most small traders. Though to be honest I've cut way back on it now. It's just too hard to buy decent well maintained stock at sensible money and the two dealers I used to trade with have been bought over and the other closed down. The big chains won't deal direct with traders sadly. ;-)


Social media: good idea, and I might go down that road. I pride myself on the art of being fairly succinct in print, if not in the spoken word, so maybe I can concoct something not too long winded but still alluring to those wanting a car with concrete suspension. Thanks again for all your advice, which I did in the end take. ;0)

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - veloceman
Don't you just love it when folk ask for advice then...........
Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - John F

.......this is for mrs argybargy.....why not try a cushion?

Did Ford firm up the suspension on Mark 2s? Our Focus is 7yrs older than this one and the ride and handling are both fine. The advanced (for its time) rear suspension is also a boon for the estate version with no intrusions into the load space.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - pd

I've always found the 1.6 Focus a bit of a sod to sell. They're not very economical (often don't get much above 30mpg), not that fast and aren't particularly cheap to tax which puts buyers off.

They're not bad cars by any means but have to be priced well to sell.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - SLO76

I've always found the 1.6 Focus a bit of a sod to sell. They're not very economical (often don't get much above 30mpg), not that fast and aren't particularly cheap to tax which puts buyers off.

They're not bad cars by any means but have to be priced well to sell.

Must have a lead foot then. It's not the most efficient in the class but I've always found 35-40mpg in normal use with a 1.6 Mk II and while certainly no ball of fire it's no slower than an equivalent Astra or Golf 1600. As for resale, well the issue is oversupply rather than any negative against the car but yes they don't fetch fortunes and a Civic of similar vintage can often fetch three times as much.

Edited by SLO76 on 20/06/2017 at 17:47

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

.......this is for mrs argybargy.....why not try a cushion?

Did Ford firm up the suspension on Mark 2s? Our Focus is 7yrs older than this one and the ride and handling are both fine. The advanced (for its time) rear suspension is also a boon for the estate version with no intrusions into the load space.

Maybe indeed there is something of the "sports suspension" in the model that I have. My son briefly owned a Mark 1 Focus which I drove several times, and from memory the ride was a good deal softer than the feller I have now.

Mrs A did buy a cushion, but I think that must be made of concrete also because it ain't made much difference.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - Manatee

SLO76 will probably remember the selling 'systems' that played on the typical fixation of customers on what their car was worth and their monthly payment budget. In a past life I was involved for a while with a couple of dealer groups that built their businesses - for a while - around them

None of the cars on display had prices on, even the new ones. The front line sales staff were not permitted to hand out official price lists, or to do a deal All the new cars on display had 'added value' rubbish such as pop up sun roofs, wheel arch garnishes (!), mud flaps, stick on coachlines etc.

All the sales staff needed to know was which car the customer was interested in, how much they wanted for their car, and what monthly payment the customer was happy with. Armed with this, the 'salesman' would trot off to the office and the sales manager and business manager would play around with the selling price (which could be tweaked up to £1,000 or more over list with the 'extras' ), the repayment period of the HP, and the APR (determining the monthly payment and the dealer finance commission).

Of course second hand car prices are very hard to compare anyway, so were the easiest to inflate.

Argybargy would have been offered £2,000 for his car, no question! Most customers would have signed the order before they ever saw the full invoice price which rarely bore any resemblance to the list price (which they hadn't seen either), or the amount they had borrowed.

Trying to have the conversation around "I just want to know your best price and the real value of my car to you" was literally impossible.

Apologies for the anecdote. Carry on.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - bazza

We have a 2010 Mk 2.5 Focus 1.6, it's been great over 5 years, needing nothing other than routine servicing. I've never found the suspension overly firm, it's on 16 inch wheels, in fact it has a better ride than our 58 reg Octavia and handles in a different league. But it is a bit noisy on harsh road surfaces, thouh not really any noisier than the Octavia. It's averaged 40 mpg in our hands, it's not fast neither does it get left behind, it's just what I would call a perfectly competent car and is very pleasant to drive. I would have another, except the latest 1.0 engines seem pretty weak on the reliability front.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - John F

We have a 2010 Mk 2.5 Focus 1.6,....... It's averaged 40 mpg in our hands....

Our 2000 Focus estate has Ford/Mazda 4F27E autobox and 123,000m. I did a long term 'brim-to-brim' calculation a few weeks ago, over 900miles of mainly country roads, occasional m/way, carefully driven, 37.6 mpg. Much the same as when we bought it in 2004 at 29,000m.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - skidpan

By the way, I love the look of the Leon but know nothing about the car, performance, features or reliabiliity wise. However, given your recommendation, skidpan, I'll check out used examples on Autowhatsit.

The performance of the 1.4 TSi is outstanding by any standard. It simply flies in any gear with no effort. The 1.2 TSi is still very good, better than any conventional 1.6 litre. Ours averaged a genuine 45 mpg for the time we owned it.

Kit is good but not outstanding. We had the SE that had all the essentials and sensible 16" wheels. Models with the technology pack option got sat nav, DAB and LED headlights, nice but not essential really.

Reliability, almost 4 years and no issues at all.

The only reason we swapped was simple, we needed more space. The Leon estate with the same engine was at the top of the list but whilst it had a huge boot the rear space was the same as the hatch and fully loaded whilst adequate a bit more was desirable. main problem was the specs, to get the 150 PS engine mean't buying the FR which had lowered sports suspension and 225 45 17 tyres, 2 features we did not want. So we bought a Skoda Superb with the same engine and even more space for less money.

Almost 4 months later our Leon still appears to be for sale. The dealer we bought the Superb from only sells used Skoda's off the forcourt normally but tried the Leon for 2 weeks because of its excellent condition, low mileage and remaining Seat warranty. It did not sell at a very sensible £8700. Some very lucky punter will get themselves a very nice car.

2 things to look out for. Ensure it has a main delaer service history and has been on the fixed not flexible service schedule. There are service books with the cars, if the seller claims it all on computer walk away, they are hiding something.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

By the way, I love the look of the Leon but know nothing about the car, performance, features or reliabiliity wise. However, given your recommendation, skidpan, I'll check out used examples on Autowhatsit.

The performance of the 1.4 TSi is outstanding by any standard. It simply flies in any gear with no effort. The 1.2 TSi is still very good, better than any conventional 1.6 litre. Ours averaged a genuine 45 mpg for the time we owned it.

Kit is good but not outstanding. We had the SE that had all the essentials and sensible 16" wheels. Models with the technology pack option got sat nav, DAB and LED headlights, nice but not essential really.

Reliability, almost 4 years and no issues at all.

The only reason we swapped was simple, we needed more space. The Leon estate with the same engine was at the top of the list but whilst it had a huge boot the rear space was the same as the hatch and fully loaded whilst adequate a bit more was desirable. main problem was the specs, to get the 150 PS engine mean't buying the FR which had lowered sports suspension and 225 45 17 tyres, 2 features we did not want. So we bought a Skoda Superb with the same engine and even more space for less money.

Almost 4 months later our Leon still appears to be for sale. The dealer we bought the Superb from only sells used Skoda's off the forcourt normally but tried the Leon for 2 weeks because of its excellent condition, low mileage and remaining Seat warranty. It did not sell at a very sensible £8700. Some very lucky punter will get themselves a very nice car.

2 things to look out for. Ensure it has a main delaer service history and has been on the fixed not flexible service schedule. There are service books with the cars, if the seller claims it all on computer walk away, they are hiding something.

And thanks again. I did have a look on Autowhoosit for Seat Leons, but I found only about 4 petrols in my price, age and mileage range. Still, your excellent recommendation gives me hope that its worth continuing to look. I'm not bothered about kit: this Focus, with its front leccy windows, aircon, alloys, leccy mirrors, all bog standard stuff these days, provides for us as much as I ever wanted in terms of fiddly bits. Its just that wretched suspension, which I admit would probably not be a problem if the Moan Zone wasn't sat beside me. Maybe I should have a towbar fitted and get her a trailer lined with velvet cushions (hope she doesn't know my log in for this site).

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

SLO76 will probably remember the selling 'systems' that played on the typical fixation of customers on what their car was worth and their monthly payment budget. In a past life I was involved for a while with a couple of dealer groups that built their businesses - for a while - around them

None of the cars on display had prices on, even the new ones. The front line sales staff were not permitted to hand out official price lists, or to do a deal All the new cars on display had 'added value' rubbish such as pop up sun roofs, wheel arch garnishes (!), mud flaps, stick on coachlines etc.

All the sales staff needed to know was which car the customer was interested in, how much they wanted for their car, and what monthly payment the customer was happy with. Armed with this, the 'salesman' would trot off to the office and the sales manager and business manager would play around with the selling price (which could be tweaked up to £1,000 or more over list with the 'extras' ), the repayment period of the HP, and the APR (determining the monthly payment and the dealer finance commission).

Of course second hand car prices are very hard to compare anyway, so were the easiest to inflate.

Argybargy would have been offered £2,000 for his car, no question! Most customers would have signed the order before they ever saw the full invoice price which rarely bore any resemblance to the list price (which they hadn't seen either), or the amount they had borrowed.

Trying to have the conversation around "I just want to know your best price and the real value of my car to you" was literally impossible.

Apologies for the anecdote. Carry on.

Cheers for that, very interesting indeed.

There was a time, I admit, when the perceived beauty of my potential next purchase was likely to blind me to the sort of fiscal realities that tend to land on you like a ton of bricks the morning after what seems like the deal of the century, but which is in fact a ripoff.

Argybargy of yesteryear might have snapped off the hand that offered him 2k for a 1.25k car. Today's version would be more likely to smell a rat.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - SLO76

SLO76 will probably remember the selling 'systems' that played on the typical fixation of customers on what their car was worth and their monthly payment budget. In a past life I was involved for a while with a couple of dealer groups that built their businesses - for a while - around them

None of the cars on display had prices on, even the new ones. The front line sales staff were not permitted to hand out official price lists, or to do a deal All the new cars on display had 'added value' rubbish such as pop up sun roofs, wheel arch garnishes (!), mud flaps, stick on coachlines etc.

All the sales staff needed to know was which car the customer was interested in, how much they wanted for their car, and what monthly payment the customer was happy with. Armed with this, the 'salesman' would trot off to the office and the sales manager and business manager would play around with the selling price (which could be tweaked up to £1,000 or more over list with the 'extras' ), the repayment period of the HP, and the APR (determining the monthly payment and the dealer finance commission).

Of course second hand car prices are very hard to compare anyway, so were the easiest to inflate.

Argybargy would have been offered £2,000 for his car, no question! Most customers would have signed the order before they ever saw the full invoice price which rarely bore any resemblance to the list price (which they hadn't seen either), or the amount they had borrowed.

Trying to have the conversation around "I just want to know your best price and the real value of my car to you" was literally impossible.

Apologies for the anecdote. Carry on.

Pretty close to the truth in the 90's. We certainly were prepared for punters who had unrealistic expectations on trade in valuations or discount. We always had marked up stock and some with no price up in preparation for them. Usually they'd be told they were fresh in from prep. In fact I often had the trainee run out and pull the screen price off a motor so I could work figures to suit. At the end of the day a dealer is there to make money and won't deal unless it's profitable to do so. Again not to say there's not room to negotiate but eyes have got to be on the all important cost to change which is the only figure of importance, along with any finance APR. Trade in value and discount mean nowt if the car is overpriced.
Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

SLO76, just to add to my earlier acknowledgement an apology for not recognising that when you told me my car was next to worthless, you were referring to its short MOT status and not to the model in general. I quite clearly missed that.

And with that, I'll let this most interesting and helpful thread die a natural death.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - SLO76

SLO76, just to add to my earlier acknowledgement an apology for not recognising that when you told me my car was next to worthless, you were referring to its short MOT status and not to the model in general. I quite clearly missed that.

And with that, I'll let this most interesting and helpful thread die a natural death.

Wasn't meaning to offend. It's a 10yr old car with nearly no Mot, to a dealer it's a risk that has to be priced in. I'm a fan of this vintage Ford Focus and would happily drive it anywhere, to me it's a better car than the current model.

Edited by SLO76 on 22/06/2017 at 00:01

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

SLO76, just to add to my earlier acknowledgement an apology for not recognising that when you told me my car was next to worthless, you were referring to its short MOT status and not to the model in general. I quite clearly missed that.

And with that, I'll let this most interesting and helpful thread die a natural death.

Wasn't meaning to offend. It's a 10yr old car with nearly no Mot, to a dealer it's a risk that has to be priced in. I'm a fan of this vintage Ford Focus and would happily drive it anywhere, to me it's a better car than the current model.

No offence taken. I fully appreciate that your comments were made with the best of intentions, and hopefully by this time tomorrow my vintage jalopy will have the 12 month ticket it so richly deserves. ;0)

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

12 month ticket in the onion bag today, with no advisories. ;0)

Might even hang onto the old lass (car) for a bit longer, and give buy the missus a season ticket for the bus.

Or more likely, continue to grunt sympathetically when she complains about the ride.

Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - SLO76
It's a good old motor, I'd keep it. Wifey will just find something else to moan about anyway if she's anything like mine. Plus short of an old Citroen or a mega pricey luxury barge you're not really gonna improve that ride much. If anything, the more modern it is the former it is.
Ford Focus 1.6 2007. - Replacement for Focus. - argybargy

Oh, she can moan for Engerland (even though we're in Wales), and even manages to moan about me moaning, which is EXCEEDINGLY unfair.

Incidentally, I've just realised that Fred Flinstone has the same initials as Ford Focus, and Fred Flintstone's car had stone wheels.

Might explain a lot.

 

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